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Games: Linux Gaming Guide, Splitgate, Intellectual Pinball

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Gaming
  • Linux Gaming Guide: How To Easily Install And Update Proton GE

    If you’re a PC gamer, or you’ve been tracking the news around Valve’s Steam Deck, you’ve probably heard about Proton, a "compatibility layer" built into Steam that makes Windows-only games playable on Linux. Valve and Codeweavers (the company behind WINE) are responsible for this wizardry that makes Linux gaming surprisingly awesome.

    Perhaps you've also heard rumblings about Proton-GE, or you've seen YouTube videos with references to "Glorious Eggroll." Glorious Eggroll is also known as Thomas Crider, a senior engineer at Red Hat. And he creates a custom version of Proton that is immensely useful.

  • Many players report that Splitgate is crashing for them on Linux

    Splitgate is one of the latest titles that gained massive popularity after its recent release on the Xbox and PlayStation. Built using Unreal Engine 4, it is a combination of Portal and Halo.

    The developers, 1047 Games, soon grew from a team of just 4 people and managed to raise $10 million in a recent funding round. While the developers welcomed the sudden influx of money, it also resulted in the game being pushed to an August release date.

  • Intellectual Pinball

    Hey there, Ernie here with a piece from Michael Bentley, who knows a ton about the intersection between trivia and technology. The two avenues crossed paths in a big way in the mid ’80s.

  • Bringing a Ruined Game Boy Cart Back To Life with Tons of Soldering

    The cartridge was badly corroded, with many of the traces eaten through, rendering the game inoperable. First, all the components were removed, and the board was cleaned. This allowed easy access to the traces across the whole board. Then, the job was to delicately remove some solder mask from the parts of the traces still remaining, and bridge the gaps with fine copper wire. Even worse, several vias were damaged, which [Taylor] tackled by feeding jumper wires through the board and executing a repair on each side.

    It’s a simple enough repair for the experienced hand, but virtually magic to a retro gaming fan that doesn’t know how to solder. [Taylor] has given us a great example of how to deal with corroded carts properly, with enough detail to be quite educational to the beginner.

More in Tux Machines

Developing A Game Engine with Perl

  • Developing A Game Engine with Perl : Part 2 - Mouse Input | Shawn [blogs.perl.org]

    Let me start by saying.... I DO NOT KNOW WHAT I AM DOING. Literally, developing a game engine is not on my resume... yet! So any code or ways of doing anything you read here, is just what I've figured out and works for me, which by no means should suggest to you that it is the proper way to do what ever it may be. Please consult your local guru first. OK, now that we have that established... Please consider the following as entertainment and should you learn along the way with me, that's wonderful! Now, by the time of writing this article, I am several months into this undertaking. I'll describe in future posts what the engine is capable of, but for today, let me tell you about what happened over the last 2 weeks. I will likely break them up into separate posts for easier consumption.

  • Developing A Game Engine with Perl: Part 3 - Hardware Failure & Server Upgrade | Shawn [blogs.perl.org]

    It's been a while since I've had to look at system logs in Linux OpenSuSE. I used to remember just doing a tail -f /var/log/messages or what ever log file you wanted to watch. I guess at some point since then they switched to using systemd journal service and you can now view everything using journalctl

  • Developing A Game Engine with Perl : Part 4 - UEFI vs OpenSuSE Installer | Shawn [blogs.perl.org]

    This is where things get interesting. After finally getting the computer together, I downloaded the OpenSuSE ISO for 64bit. I went with Tumbleweed again. It worked well with the last server, so I'll just go with what I know. Tumbleweed is a rolling release linux, which means I shouldn't have to reinstall when a new version is released and I should still stay up to date. I created a bootable USB from ISO in Ubuntu 20.04 (My Desktop). Booted the new computer, installed OpenSuSE, and was happy... until I tried to reboot. When I rebooted, I pulled out the USB stick and the BIOS said no boot drives. I knew of UEFI, and started reading. I found that in /boot/efi/ there was no EFI directory. If you don't know anything about UEFI (No worries, neither do I) ..apparently there is supposed to be a Fat32 partition marked as type EFI. The BIOS checks for this location and attempts to load the OS this way as apposed to using the MBR for booting like in the old days.

  • Developing A Game Engine with Perl: Part 5 - 32bit -> 64bit & Perl's Storable | Shawn [blogs.perl.org]

    After doing some quick reading, I came to understand that Perl uses architecture specific ways to save content to files when using Storable. Specifically if you use lock_store and store. These are part of Perl's core system and what I use throughout the engine for working with the file structure. I had to carefully re-read the perldoc's to discover that you can avoid architecture incompatibility by simply using nstore and lock_nstore The method you use for retrieving the stored files doesn't matter, only when storing the data into files does it matter. I tried to find ways of being able to convert the stored files from 32bit architecture to 64bit, but ultimately the only real option was to use the old server to re-store the files with lock_nstore.

Games: Steam Next Fest, Heroic Games Launcher, and More

  • Steam Next Fest gave developers a '500%' increase in converting wishlists to sales | GamingOnLinux

    Valve has written up a short blog post going over how their Steam Next Fest has improved things for developers, and it seems by a huge amount in some cases. For users who haven't seen one before, Steam Next Fest is a regular event Steam now runs a few times a year, that gives developers some extra time in the spotlight. Developers can offer up limited-time demos, do livestreams and talks - all in the name of pulling in my wishlists and sales.

  • Heroic Games Launcher for Epic Games appears popular with over 100K downloads | GamingOnLinux

    Despite the Epic Games Store not offering Linux support at all, it still seems to be somewhat popular with Linux users as the unofficial Heroic Games Launcher hit a big downloads milestone. Taking into account that the project does now also support Windows and macOS, it was originally Linux-only up until July 2021 where it gained initial support for the others. In early November developer Flávio F Lima noted Heroic had hit 100,000 downloads, and less than a month later it's hit another 10,000+ according to the GitHub project page.

  • Steam sees more growth with Linux gamers, and Windows 11 popularity surges

    Admittedly in November, there was only a very slight uptick of 0.03%, but that’s still an increase, taking Linux to 1.16% as mentioned.

Open 3D Engine (O3DE) Update

  • Open 3D Foundation announces first major release of Open 3D Engine

    The news in brief: Simulation developers can now create 3D content with the new Open 3D Engine (O3DE) Linux editor and engine runtime, and a new Debian package and Windows installer provide a faster route to getting started with the engine. [...] In July, we formed the Open 3D Foundation and released the Developer Preview of Open 3D Engine—a modular and extensible engine free from commercial license requirements that includes a multi-threaded photorealistic renderer, a 3D content editor, a server authoritative networking stack with native cloud integrations, and a programmable asset processing pipeline. The Developer Preview gave the community early access to a source-only version of the engine in order to evaluate the core set of capabilities, provide feedback on the project, and begin contributing to O3DE’s development and governance. With today’s release, developers can build 3D games and simulations, or a customized game engine on a stable foundation with support from the O3DE community and O3DF. Developers using Linux can now install a native version of the engine with the Debian-based Linux package distribution. Teams using Windows can get started even faster with a verified Windows installer. This release also adds new developer features such as performance profiling and benchmarking tools, an experimental terrain system, a Script Canvas integration for the multiplayer networking system, and an SDK to facilitate engine customization with platform support for Windows, Linux, MacOS, iOS, and Android. In addition to core engine capabilities, Open 3D Foundation members have contributed new capabilities to O3DE through the extensible Gem system. Kythera released an update to their artificial intelligence Gem to add support for pre-built O3DE SDK, enabling creators to include AI behaviors in their games and simulations. Cesium released a geospatial 3D tile extension. PopcornFX released a Gem for particle visual effects. The Gem system has also been extended to enable external Gem repositories, making it even easier to add capabilities from third party contributors.

  • O3DE 21.11 Released As First Major Open 3D Engine Release - Phoronix

    This summer there was the surprise announcement of Amazon's Lumberyard game engine being open-sourced and it being developed as the Open 3D Engine by the then newly-created Open 3D Foundation as part of the Linux Foundation. Amazon's Lumberyard served as the basis for the Open 3D Engine as an Apache 2.0 licensed game engine available without any commercial terms or other obstacles. In the months since this code has continued to be refined, initial Linux support added after embarrassingly not having this at time of announcement for this Linux Foundation hosted effort, and growing industry/developer interest in this open-source game engine option.

  • Open 3D Engine (O3DE) sees a first major release, Linux support in preview | GamingOnLinux

    Open 3D Engine (O3DE) from the Open 3D Foundation is what was once Amazon Lumberyard, now open source it's just had a first major stable release.

  • In 2021, the Linux Foundation Drove Innovation Across the Technology Spectrum and in Key Industry Verticals - Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation welcomed the Open 3D Foundation into its community of families in July of 2021. The first project in the foundation was the Open 3D Engine known as O3DE. Amazon Web Services donated it under an Apache 2.0 and MIT licensing model. The mission of the Open 3D Engine is to make an open source, fully-featured, high-fidelity, real-time 3D engine for building games and simulations available to every industry. Since its inception, it has raised $2.7 million in commitments from 26 partners in over two years. It has received signed commitments from a range of companies such as Adobe, Intel, AWS, Niantic, Huawei, SideFX, HERE, and others. The foundation is focused on industries that utilize 3D technologies. This includes video games, automotive, simulation, robotics, energy, real estate, training, film, special effects, machine learning, aerospace, and many other verticals. Since its inception, it has grown to over 3600 stars, 1100 forks of the repository, 1,500 Discord users, and 500+ active members are online. It has increased to over 130 authors of code, 7000 file changes, 2,000,000 changes to lines of code, and a vibrant & active self-sustaining support community averaging 500 messages & minutes per day.

RK3399K based module and SBC can operate at -20 to 80℃

Forlinx announced a “FET3399K-C SOM” that runs Android 7.1 or Linux on a Rockchip RK3399K with up to 4GB LPDDR3 and 32GB eMMC plus -20 to 80℃ support. An “OK3399K-C” SBC based on it offers GbE, 4x USB, HDMI, MIPI DSI/CSI, M.2, and mini-PCIe. Forlinx announced an update to its FET3399-C SOM and OK3399-C SBC that advances from the the Rockchip RK3399 to the RK3399K, enabling a wider -20 to 80℃ operating range instead of 0 to 80℃ . The FET3399K-C SOM and OK3399K-C SBC appear to be otherwise identical to the year-old originals. Since we missed that announcement, we cover the boards in detail below. Read more