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Why my public library chooses Linux and open source

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
OSS

The Crawford County Federated Library System has been using Linux and open source software in its IT operations since 1999. They realized early on the potential of open source and integrated it into their enterprise. They were a part of my own Linux journey as I built a content filtering system for our school district. Twenty years ago, there were few models for the use of open source in libraries and education. Meadville Public Library and the Crawford County Federated Library System were the leaders then and now. Recently I had some questions about how to help libraries in our own library system, and I called Meadville. They referred me to Cindy Murdock Ames, their IT Director. I asked her what they were using for patron desktop computers. Cindy sent a brief email that piqued my interest, and I asked her if she would agree to an email interview. She graciously accepted.

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Linux 5.15-rc6

So here we are, slightly later on a Sunday than usual due to travel,
but rc6 is out.

I'd love to say that it's all looking average, but rc6 is actually
bigger han rc5 was, and larger than normal for this time in the
release cycle.

It's not _enormously_ larger than normal, and it's not the largest rc6
we've had, but it's still slightly worrisome. By rc6 I really do
expect things to have started calming down.

I'm hoping it's just one of those random timing effects, with a couple
of slightly bigger pulls having come in the last week, and we'll see
the next week being extra quiet because rc6 got some of the stuff that
would normally have hit rc7. It happens. But let's see how this goes.

The 5.15 cycle over-all remains one of the smaller cycles (at least
counting commits), so I wouldn't have expected this to be one that
requires an extra rc, but that may be what ends up happening unless
the upcoming week is really nice and calm.

That said, nothing in here looks _particularly_ worrisome. It really
smells like just random timing effects to me, with networking, GPU
drivers, and ntfs3 all having had a somewhat active week.  Other than
that it all really looks fairly normal.

Full details in the shortlog below.

Please give it a whirl. And let's hope for a nice calm next week and a
smaller rc7.

              Linus
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Best Free and Open Source Alternatives to Adobe Photoshop

Adobe is a large multinational computer software company with over 22,000 employees. Its flagship products include Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Premiere Pro, XD, Acrobat DC, as well as the ubiquitous the Portable Document Format (PDF). Their products are wrapped up and marketed as the Creative Cloud, a subscription-only way of accessing more than 20 desktop and mobile apps and services for photography, design, video, web, UX, and more. We are long-standing admirers of Adobe’s products. They develop many high quality proprietary programs. It’s true there are security and privacy concerns in relation to some of their products. And there’s considerable criticism attached to their pricing practices. But the fundamental issue regarding Adobe Creative Cloud is that Linux isn’t a supported platform. And there’s no prospect of support forthcoming. Read more

6 Best Command Line Music Players for Linux in 2021

Linux terminal is used for performing administrative tasks without having any issues. However, many people don't know that we can play music through the command line. Linux provides different CLI music players by which users can play the audio files from the terminal. CLI music players are simple to use and consume lesser memory. This article briefs about the 6 best command line Music players for Linux in 2021. Read more