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Linux Foundation: PaSh, LFMS, and 'Studies'

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Linux
  • Linux Foundation to Host the PaSh Project, Accelerating Shell Scripting with Automated Parallelization for Industrial Use Cases - Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host the PaSh project. PaSh is a system for automatically parallelizing POSIX shell scripts that optimizes programs and speeds up execution times, leading to faster results for data scientists, engineers, biologists, economists, administrators, and programmers.

    The project is supported by MIT, Rice University, Stevens Institute of Technology, and the University of Pennsylvania and governed by a Technical Steering Committee that includes Nikos Vasilakis, research scientist at MIT; Michael Greenberg, assistant professor at Stevens Institute of Technology; and Konstantinos Kallas, Ph.D. student at University of Pennsylvania.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Agenda and Speaker Lineup for the 2021 Linux Foundation Member Summit - Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the agenda and speaker lineup for the 2021 Linux Foundation Member Summit (LFMS), taking place November 2-4 at the Silverado Resort in Napa Valley, California. The keynote speakers can be viewed here and the full schedule can be viewed here.

    LFMS, (formerly Open Source Leadership Summit), is a by-invitation event for Linux Foundation member organizations, where technical and business leaders convene to drive digital transformation and learn how to collaboratively manage the largest shared technology investment of our time. LFMS is a must-attend event for those looking to advance open source strategy, implementation and investment.

  • The 2021 Open Source Jobs Report: 9th Annual Report on Critical Skills, Hiring Trends and Education

    Much of the world is rebounding from the economically crippling lockdowns of COVID-19, and hiring people with the right skills is proving to be a challenge. Nowhere is this more true than in the technology sector. The talent gap that existed before the pandemic has worsened due to an acceleration of cloud-native adoption as remote work has gone mainstream. With talent shortages around the globe, training existing staff has become even more important to meet the needs of migrations to the cloud and leverage open source technologies tied to those migrations.

Open Source Talent Shortage Persists

  • Open Source Talent Shortage Persists

    The need for open source skills persists, with 50 percent of employers surveyed expecting to increase hires this year, according to the 2021 Open Source Jobs Report from the Linux Foundation and edX.

    However, 92 percent of managers report difficulty finding skilled talent, while also struggling to retain existing talent in the face of fierce competition.

Open Source Talent Is In High Demand Than Ever

  • Open Source Talent Is In High Demand Than Ever: Linux Foundation Report

    Overwhelming numbers of hiring managers (92%) report difficulty finding sufficient talent with open source skills as they also struggle to hold onto existing talent in the face of fierce competition. Half of companies are accelerating open source hiring, further exacerbating the talent gap, according to the 2021 Open Source Jobs Report released by the Linux Foundation and edX.

Linux Foundation To Host PaSh...

  • Linux Foundation To Host PaSh For Automatic Parallelizing Of Shell Scripts - Phoronix

    The Linux Foundation announced today they will be hosting the PaSh project that is focused on automatically parallelizing POSIX shell scripts.

    PaSh is focused on optimizing shell scripts for faster performance in areas around data science, engineering, economists, and more. The apparent Linux Foundation focus is on industrial use-cases.

Open Source Jobs Report: Cloud skills in demand

  • Open Source Jobs Report: Cloud skills in demand • The Register

    The Linux Foundation and edX's latest annual Open Source Jobs Report highlights an explosion of interest in cloud technologies that has bumped Linux off the skillset top spot for the first time.

    "Much of the world is rebounding from the economically crippling lockdowns of COVID-19, and hiring people with the right skills is proving to be a challenge," Clyde Seepersad, senior veep and general manager for training and certification at the Linux Foundation, claimed in the report's introduction.

  • More Open Source Jobs Remain Vacant With Scarcity of Skilled Linux Talent

    If you have the Linux skills to bolster a solid IT foundation, you will be in high demand for a job working in the open source software industry.

    Hiring is rebounding in the wake of the pandemic, as organizations look to continue their digital transformation activities. This is evidenced by 50 percent of employers The Linux Foundation surveyed who stated they are increasing hires this year.

More from ZDNet

  • Technology skills in demand, 2021: cloud, with a twist of open source

    This question was addressed in a recent survey report, covering 750 open source professionals and 200 hiring managers, published by The Linux Foundation and edX, which shows hiring is rebounding in the wake of the pandemic. Fifty percent of employers surveyed who stated they are increasing hires this year. There are significant challenges though, with 92% of managers reporting difficulty finding enough talent, as they also struggle to hold onto existing talent in the face of fierce competition. Furthermore, the rapid adoption of open source software is widening the skills gap in the market. This is especially true for cloud native application development and operations skills, topping the list of 46% of hiring managers.

    "For those looking for the best career paths, cloud-native computing, DevOps, Linux, and security hold the most promising opportunities, said Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation. Indeed.

Linux Foundation says companies are desperate for open source...

  • Linux Foundation says companies are desperate for open source talent

    The Linux Foundation released its 2021 Open Source Jobs Report this month, which aims to inform both sides of the IT hiring process about current trends. The report accurately foreshadows many of its conclusions in the first paragraph, saying "the talent gap that existed before the pandemic has worsened due to an acceleration of cloud-native adoption as remote work has gone mainstream." In other words: job-shopping Kubernetes and AWS experts are in luck.

    The Foundation surveyed roughly 200 hiring managers and 750 open source professionals to find out which skills—and HR-friendly resume bullet points—are in the greatest demand. According to the report, college-degree requirements are trending down, but IT-certification requirements and/or preferences are trending up—and for the first time, "cloud-native" skills (such as Kubernetes management) are in higher demand than traditional Linux skills.

    The hiring priority shift from traditional Linux to "cloud-native" skill sets implies that it's becoming more possible to live and breathe containers without necessarily understanding what's inside them—but you can't have Kubernetes, Docker, or similar computing stacks without a traditional operating system beneath them. In theory, any traditional operating system could become the foundation of a cloud-native stack—but in practice, Linux is overwhelmingly what clouds are made of.

Another one

Here’s All You Need to Know About Open Source Job Market in 2021

  • Here’s All You Need to Know About Open Source Job Market in 2021

    The open-source job industry is one of the biggest out there. However, the pandemic affected various sectors in a lot of ways.

    The Linux Foundation teamed up with edX to survey several professionals and hiring managers to gain insights on open-source job skill demands, the hottest skills, and the state of the industry.

    Here, let me mention some key highlights of the report.

PaSh Again

  • Speedy PaSh shell compiler finds new home at the Linux Foundation

    The Linux Foundation has adopted the PaSh Project, which offers a Linux-based compiler for automatically parallelizing POSIX shell scripts to optimize programs and speed execution, especially on multiprocessor systems.

    The PaSh compiler, which is designed for parallelizing and thereby speeding up POSIX shell scripts, has a new home with the Linux Foundation. PaSh appears to be a major advance for a shell script language that has been around for almost a quarter century and is used across the technology spectrum in utility programs such as Bash.

    PaSh is designed to “improve upon and accelerate the execution of shell scripts in the face of new web crawling, indexing and natural language processing changes,” stated Nikos Vasilakis, Technical Steering Committee chair and MIT researcher.

Another new press release from LF

  • The Linux Foundation’s Open Networking and Edge (ONE) Summit Expands Programming with Keynote and Mini Summit by the US Government, Enabling Secure, Open, and Programmable 5G Networks

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, along with co-hosts LF Edge, LF Networking, and Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), today announced additional programming for ONE Summit contributed by the United States government. New programming includes a keynote address by Dr. Dan Massey, Project Leader, Operate through DoD 5G to NextG Initiative, as well as a US GOV OPS Mini Summit.

    “We are honored to have such a broad and distinguished swath of experts participating in ONE Summit,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge and IoT, the Linux Foundation. “The latest additions to our program bring an even more diverse perspective on the future of 5G, and how initiatives like the 5G Super Blue Print can be consumed by both governments and enterprises.”

Another late puff piece

By Microsoft Nick

Some more LF/Spamnil fluff

  • Linux Foundation Announces 2 Millionth Course Enrollment On edX Learning Platform

    The Linux Foundation has announced that there have been two million enrollments to date across all of its online courses offered on the edX platform. These open source training courses have continually increasing rates of enrollment growth as the curriculum continues to expand, with offerings covering technologies like cloud infrastructure, blockchain, networking, and DevOps.

Linux Foundation Technical Advisory

  • Results from the 2021 Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board election [Ed: Microsoft inside the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board, still]

    This year's election for the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory
    Board had 1012 authorized voters; 237 of them cast ballots.
    The results were:

    1. Greg-KH
    2. Jonathan Corbet
    3. Steven Rostedt
    4. Theodore Ts'o
    5. Sasha Levin
    ---
    6. Dave Hansen
    7. Kent Overstreet
    8. Dave Taht

    The top five will serve two-year terms on the TAB.

    Thank you to all the candidates for their nominations and to everyone
    for voting.

    If you have any questions please reach out to
    tab-elections@lists.linuxfoundation.org

    Thanks,
    Laura

  • Results from the 2021 Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board election

    The 2021 election for the Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory board resulted in all five incumbent members (Greg Kroah-Hartman, Jonathan Corbet, Steven Rostedt, Ted Ts'o, and Sasha Levin) being re-elected. Of the 1,012 developers authorized to vote, 237 actually cast ballots.

Enterprise Open Source Job Applicant Shortage Persists in 2021..

  • Enterprise Open Source Job Applicant Shortage Persists in 2021, Linux Foundation Survey Finds

    Though IT hiring is showing signs of rebounding in the wake of the still-lingering COVID-19 pandemic, finding qualified candidates with high-demand open source skills continues to be a huge challenge for many enterprises around the world.

    That is one of the frustrations repeatedly being heard from hiring managers everywhere, according to the latest 2021 Open Source Jobs Report from The Linux Foundation and learning platform vendor edX.

PR for Microsoft

  • Microsoft teams up with Linux Foundation on energy [Ed: The 'Linux' Foundation is morally bankrupt]

    Software King of the World Microsoft has joined forces with LF Energy, a Linux Foundation nonprofit working to accelerate the energy transition of the world's grids and transportation systems through open source.

    Microsoft, which once famously dubbed Linux a cancer on software, has improved its open saucy street cred and is even a strategic member of the Linux foundation. Audrey Lee, senior director of energy strategy at Microsoft, was elected to serve on the LF Energy Foundation Governing Board.

Real-time Analytics News for Week Ending September 25

  • Real-time Analytics News for Week Ending September 25

    The Linux Foundation announced there have been two million enrollments to date across all of its online courses offered on the edX platform. These open-source training courses have continually increasing rates of enrollment growth as the curriculum continues to expand, with offerings covering technologies like cloud infrastructure, blockchain, networking, and DevOps. In total, Linux Foundation Training & Certification offers more than two dozen courses on edX, all of which can be audited at no cost, increasing accessibility for all learners.

Amber Ankerholz pushing this PR for LF

  • Training and Certification Are Key to Open Source Jobs

    As mentioned previously, open source skills are in high demand, with 92 percent of hiring managers reporting difficulty finding skilled talent, according to the recent 2021 Open Source Jobs Report from the Linux Foundation and edX. In this article, we’ll look at specific in-demand skills and other insights from the survey.

    "Open source talent is in high demand, encouraging the most experienced pros to look for new opportunities while hiring managers battle it out for the most desirable candidates," said Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin. "For those looking for the best career paths, it is evident that cloud native computing, DevOps, Linux, and security hold the most promising opportunities."

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today's leftovers

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    Just one week ago Linux block subsystem maintainer Jens Axboe was optimizing the kernel to get 8 million IOPS on a single CPU core. He progressed the week hitting around ~8.9M IOPS per-core and began to think he was hitting the hardware limits and running out of possible optimizations. However, this week he is kicking things off by managing to hit 10 million IOPS!

  • Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Quick overview #Shorts - Invidious

    A Quick overview of Ubuntu Kylin 21.10.

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    Losing your access to your user account on Linux can be really frustrating but luckily resetting that lost password is actually incredibly easy but the process slightly changes depending on the bootloader you're using at least for the easy approach

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 706

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 706 for the week of October 17 – 23, 2021.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.43 Thank You

    Oleksandr Kyriukhin has released the 2021.10 version of the Rakudo Compiler, which includes all of the work of the new MoarVM dispatch mechanism. This is the culmination of more than 1.5 year work by many people, but mostly by Jonathan Worthington. A historic step forward that lays the groundwork on more efficient executing of Raku programs, and actually delivers on a number of improvements.

  • Team Profile by KDE's Cornelius Schumacher

    What makes a great team? One important factor is that you have a balanced set of skills and personalities in the team. A team which only consists of leaders won't get much work done. A team which only consists of workers will not work into the right direction. So how can you identify the right balance and combination of people? One answer is the Team Member Profile Test. It's a set of questions which team members answer. They are evaluated to give a result indicating which type of team member the person is and where it lies in the spectrum of possible types.

  • Some users on Reddit report that Windows 11 loses Internet connectivity when trying to connect to NordVPN.
  • Pat Gelsinger's Open-Source Bias, Intel's Pledge To Openness [Ed: Intel is openwashing again, but leaks from Intel show that Intel is a foe, not a a friend. It's also rather ironic that Intel puts an "open" letter in a proprietary site of Microsoft, which is viciously attacking Free software. Intel is a Microsoft booster.]

    Ahead of Intel's inaugural Intel Innovation event taking place virtually later this week, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger published an open letter to an open ecosystem. In this open ecosystem letter, Gelsinger talks up opennness and choice, adding, "This is why I fundamentally believe in an open source bias, which powers the software-defined infrastructure that transformed the modern data center and ushered in the data-centric era."

Raspberry Pi and Arduino Leftovers

  • Fast Indoor Robot Watches Ceiling Lights, Instead of the Road

    To pull this off, [Andy] uses a camera with a fisheye lens aimed up towards the ceiling, and the video is processed on a Raspberry Pi 3.

  • Tackle The Monkey: Raspberry Pi Gets Round Screen | Hackaday

    You could argue that the project to add a round screen to a Raspberry Pi from [YamS1] isn’t strictly necessary. After all, you could use a square display with a mask around it, giving up some screen real estate for aesthetics. However, you’d still have a square shape around the screen and there’s something eye-catching about a small round screen for a watch, an indicator, or — as in this project — a talking head. The inspiration for the project was a quote from a Google quote about teaching a monkey to recite Shakespeare. A 3D printed monkey with a video head would be hard to do well with a rectangular screen, you have to admit. Possible with a little artistry, we are sure, but the round head effect is hard to beat. Honestly, it looks more like an ape to us, but we aren’t primate experts and we think most people would get the idea.

  • Move! makes burning calories a bit more fun | Arduino Blog

    Gamifying exercise allows people to become more motivated and participate more often in physical activities while also being distracted by doing something fun at the same time. This inspired a team of students from the Handong Global University in Pohang, South Korea to come up with a system, dubbed “Move!,” that uses a microcontroller to detect various gestures and perform certain actions in mobile games accordingly. They started by collecting many different gesture samples from a Nano 33 BLE Sense, which is worn by a person on their wrist. This data was then used to train a TensorFlow Lite model that classifies the gesture and sends it via Bluetooth to the host phone running the app. Currently, the team’s mobile app contains three games that a player can choose from.

Security Leftovers