Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Web Browsers Monopolisation

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
Moz/FF
Web
  • Brave and Firefox to intercept links that force-open in Microsoft Edge

    Microsoft has inadvertently re-heated the web browser wars with the company’s anti-competitive changes to Windows 11. It made it more difficult to change the default web browser and has expanded the use of links that force-opens Edge instead of the default browser.

    The latter issue is something I addressed in 2017 with the release of EdgeDeflector. Instead of using regular https: links, Microsoft began switching out links in the Windows shell and its apps with microsoft-edge: links. Only its Edge browser recognized these links, so it would open regardless of your default browser setting. I created EdgeDeflector to also recognizes them and rewrites them to regular https: links that would then open in your default web browser.

  • What if Chrome broke features of the web and Google forgot to tell anyone? Oh wait, that's exactly what happened

    "Browser monoculture" is often bemoaned as a threat to the web. According to Statscounter, which tracks browser use, over 70 per cent of the market is made up of people using Google Chrome or another browser based on the underlying Chromium project.

    What web advocates worry about when they say this is bad is that Google can effectively determine the future of the web by determining which features to support and which not to. That's a lot of power for a single company that also has an effective monopoly on search and advertising.

    What would happen if Chrome decided to break fundamental features of the web and didn't even feel the need to tell anyone?

    Well, we can answer that question because that's what Chrome did.

    Earlier this year Chrome developers decided that the browser should no longer support JavaScript dialogs and alert windows when they're called by third-party iframes.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Budgie Sets its Sights on Gamers

Ubuntu Budgie is already a well-designed Linux desktop distribution. With a pleasant UI that makes interacting with Linux incredibly simple. But with the upcoming release of 22.04, the developers are adding a new layer of goodness to the platform. First and foremost, the new release will include tools to vastly improve the gaming experience. Gamers will find things like MangoHUD (a Vulkan and OpenGL overlay for monitoring FPS, temperatures, CPU/GPU load, and more), CoreCtrl (allows you to control computer hardware with application profiles), Polychromatic and OpenRGB (RGP lighting management). Read more

SimpleX Is a Chat Network That Preserves Metadata Privacy

SimpleX is an open-source decentralized client-server network that uses disposable nodes to asynchronously pass the messages, providing receiver and sender anonymity. Messaging apps make it easy to communicate and connect with people around the world. However, with new ways to communicate and connect via technology, there are also new ways for your privacy and security to be breached. SimpleX is one of the most private and secure chat and applications platform that you can find out there. The main difference of SimpleX Chat is that it does not use any form of identity at all for message routing, requiring to establish initial connection either out of band or via some touch points that do not participate in the message routing, so the only way to build connections of SimpleX network is by observing IP packet times. Read more

Windows box won't boot? SystemRescue 9 may help

The latest version of an old friend of the jobbing support bod has delivered a new kernel to help with fixing Microsoft's finest. It used to be called the System Rescue CD, but who uses CDs any more? Enter SystemRescue, an ISO image that you can burn, or just drop onto your Ventoy USB key, and which may help you to fix a borked Windows box. Or a borked Linux box, come to that. SystemRescue 9 includes Linux kernel 5.15 and a minimal Xfce 4.16 desktop (which isn't loaded by default). There is a modest selection of GUI tools: Firefox, VNC and RDP clients and servers, and various connectivity tools – SSH, FTP, IRC. There's also some security-related stuff such as Yubikey setup, KeePass, token management, and so on. The main course is a bunch of the usual Linux tools for partitioning, formatting, copying, and imaging disks. You can check SMART status, mount LVM volumes, rsync files, and other handy stuff. Usefully, there's also a full local copy of the website and all documentation, including a console-mode web browser to read it with. Read more

GNOME Shell ’Extensions Manager’ App Gets a Big Ol’ Update

Remember that new app for installing GNOME extensions I wrote about earlier this month? Well, it just got its first major update. And it adds a ton of much-requested features. For those unfamiliar with it, Extension Manager is a desktop app that lets you search, browse, manage, and install GNOME extensions without having to use a web browser. The app is built in GTK4 and libadwaita and is available to install from Flathub. Read more