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KDE's 25th Anniversary

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KDE

You'll find on the website − https://25years.kde.org/ − the full celebration of the event: videos, meeting, activities, old KDE distro ready to run on virtual machine, merch (Tee-Shirt/Stickers).

But if you still wonder what is KDE; I'll try to give you an overview: KDE is an international free software community that develops free and open-source software. KDE helps these projects to get common tools: bug trackers, software development forge, distributing the software, organizing in real life events like sprints,conferences, etc... Y

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Twenty-Five Years of KDE

  • Twenty-Five Years of KDE

    It's KDE's birthday today. Twenty-five years ago Matthias Ettrich called for programmers to create a GUI for end users of Linux. They came and did. I wrote about the first Twenty Years of KDE five years ago. What I wrote there is still true, but there is more.

KDE celebrates 25 years with a big new Plasma desktop release

  • KDE celebrates 25 years with a big new Plasma desktop release

    Has it really been 25 years? That's absolute madness. I still remember trying out the first released version of KDE. Plasma - 25th Anniversary Edition is available now.

    For this release a big user-facing change is the new Breeze — Blue Ocean theme that has an aim to make everything much more clear. Lots of little enhancements like active elements lighting up when a window gets focus, scrollbars are bigger and more accessible but redesigned to still look good. There's some more "glossiness and style to the desktop" with lots of subtle added details. You can also choose accent colours now in the system settings (for highlighted items), allowing you to adjust it without switching your theme.

Plasma - 25th Anniversary Edition

  • Plasma - 25th Anniversary Edition

    25 years ago today, Matthias Ettrich sent an email to the de.comp.os.linux.misc newsgroup explaining a project he was working on. The latest and direct result of that email (plus a quarter of a century of relentless experimentation, development and innovation) has just landed in KDE’s repositories.

    This time around, Plasma renews its looks and, not only do you get a new wallpaper, but also a gust of fresh air from an updated theme: Breeze - Blue Ocean. The new Breeze theme makes KDE apps and tools not only more attractive, but also easier to use both on the desktop and your phone and tablet.

    Of course, looks are not the only you can expect from Plasma 25AE: extra speed, increased reliability and new features have also found their way into the app launcher, the software manager, the Wayland implementation, and most other Plasma tools and utilities.

KDE Plasma 5.23 Released In Marking 25 Years Of KDE

  • KDE Plasma 5.23 Released In Marking 25 Years Of KDE

    KDE Plasma 5.23 is officially out this morning as the newest major open-source desktop release and is known now as the KDE 25th Anniversary Edition.

    The KDE community is celebrating the 25th birthday of what started as the "Kool Desktop Environment" and they now have this new Plasma release that is in very good shape to mark the occasion. KDE Plasma 5.23 / 25th Anniversary Edition is very exciting with countless improvements, much better Wayland support that is good enough for day-to-day use for most individuals, and a number of other noticeable refinements throughout.

Happy 25th KDE | Kdenlive

  • Happy 25th KDE | Kdenlive

    Happy 25th birthday KDE. We love being part of this wonderful community! Join the party at: https://25years.kde.org/

KDE Plasma 5.23 Release Marks its 25th Anniversary

LWN

Linux / Unix-Desktop KDE celebrates its 25th birthday

  • Linux / Unix-Desktop KDE celebrates its 25th birthday: Happy Birthday! - Market Research Telecast [Ed: Automated translation]

    Today, October 14th, the KDE project celebrates its birthday: 25 years ago the first version of the “Kool Desktop Environment” appeared, from which the popular Linux / Unix desktop environment KDE Plasma emerged. The KDE team is celebrating the special day with a new plasma version, but also with various events and extras for the community on their own birthday website.

    For the 25th KDE birthday, we take a look back at the previous history of the KDE project – and forward to the current birthday campaigns. We are dedicating a separate message to the new KDE Plasma 5.23, which we will link to at this point later.

    KDE: emergence and first hurdles
    On October 14, 1996, the computer science student Matthias Ettrich resigned in the Usenet group de.comp.os.linux.misc the “Kool Desktop Environment (KDE)”. It should not only simplify the operation on Linux and Unix systems, but also bring along all the applications necessary for the work and give them a uniform appearance at the same time. The commercial Common Desktop Environment (CDE) served as an obvious model. Other comrades-in-arms quickly found themselves around the world who actively pushed the project forward. The team bundled its campaigns early on in KDE eV, which has since assumed financial responsibility for the project, organizes conferences and provides organizational support for the community.

Congrats KDE

  • Congrats KDE

    If you you like open source you embrace it fully and embrace that it is about freedom, and part of that freedom is to make a desktop for people that don't mind options.. you like a different desktop with less options?, great we in open source also made that for you enjoy.. and a ton of other things in between, that is what is great about it.. freedom to experiment.. freedom to choose..

    The vast majority of the Designers in KDE do their work in their free time without any more compensation than an occasional thank you, back in my time we were no more than 2-3 people at any given time...

    Please stop comparing us to the likes of Apple and Microsoft, 2-3 designers can't do the work that you expect from multiple hundreds ? The simple fact that sometimes we nail things better is bloody amazing.. so... Yeah... c'mon we do it for the users not to get random abuse online...

KDE turns 25 and the celebration is already underway

  • KDE turns 25 and the celebration is already underway

    KDE turns 25 . On this day a quarter of a century ago, a young German software engineer named Matthias Ettrich culminated his final degree project with an ambitious proposal : the creation of a desktop environment for Linux and other Unix systems that was “consistent, pleasant and free »using the Qt library. Thus was born Kool Desktop Environment, more popular today for its acronym.

    Since then it has not rained not much, but a lot and KDE has become one of the most important Free Software projects and communities in the world , although it has remained on the less populous and profitable side of the end user and not so much on that of the company, even though the truth is that the software as such is agnostic and only attends to what its license allows.

    KDE thus became the first Linux desktop environment and after four major versions in which it has not stopped expanding and improving, in one of the best desktop environments for PC, standing up to and even surpassing alternatives developed by the big companies in the technology sector. But KDE is not just a desktop environment, it is much more than that.

Video about this

FOSSlife Team

  • KDE Announces Plasma 25th Anniversary Edition

    KDE Plasma 5.23 marks the 25th anniversary of the KDE desktop environment.

    This release brings a fresh new theme and custom color options along with enhancements to the app launcher, the software manager, and other Plasma tools and utilities.

ITWire

  • German developer Ettrich's dream, KDE, is now 25 years old

    German software developer Matthias Ettrich [seen below, right, in a photo courtesy of the KDE] kicked off the project, sending an email on 14 October 1996 to outline his aspirations.

    He had one main goal: to create a graphical user environment for the end-user, or as he put it: "Somebody who wants to browse the web with Linux, write some letters and play some nice games."

    The name KDE was intended to be some kind of play on CDE, the Common Desktop Environment that had been developed by HP, IBM and Sun.

Happy 25th Birthday, KDE!

  • Happy 25th Birthday, KDE!

    The brainchild of Matthias Ettrich, KDE stands for Kool Desktop Environment, at least according to the "KDE Timeline" on the KDE website. The interview in the April 2003 edition of Linux Journal gives a slightly different accounting of where the KDE name came from, however. Whatever the history of the name is, KDE has found a niche in the Linux world, and given Linux users everywhere access to a modern, customizable, rich, and full featured desktop environment.

    Today, KDE is a stable and popular Linux desktop environment. To say it's full featured would be an understatement. In fact, for some users, there's "too much" eye candy (a.k.a. flash, sparkle and glitz), and it distracts from performing necessary computing tasks. But many others find great solace in using KDE and all of its features. It is one of the most popular desktop environments out there for Linux. In fact, it is the "flagship" desktop environment for PCLinuxOS.

Plasma 25th Anniversary Edition released

  • [Older] Plasma 25th Anniversary Edition released

    I’ve used every release of KDE extensively, and its developers have every right to be damn proud of the amazing collection of frameworks and applications they’ve built. As with everything, KDE is not for everyone, but there’s no denying it’s a versatile, attractive, extensible, and fun to use environment.

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