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Games: Proton Experimental, Lutris 0.5.9, Midnight Protocol, and More

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Gaming
  • Proton Experimental fixes up Satisfactory networking making it easier to join others | GamingOnLinux

    Satisfactory is a first-person open-world factory building sim from Coffee Stain Studios and while it works well on Linux with Steam Play Proton the online networking had a big issue.

    For people with multiple network connections, trying to join others online would be problematic and most of the time just not work at all with an error message. There were workarounds like disabling other connections but it obviously wasn't ideal and just another barrier. Thankfully the Proton Experimental release from October 13 notes a single change as "Fix connection issues in Satisfactory on systems with multiple network interfaces".

  • Lutris 0.5.9 Released for Easier Access to Linux Games - itsfoss.net

    After almost a year of development , the gaming platform has Lutris 0.5.9 been released , providing tools to simplify the installation, configuration and management of games on Linux. The project code is written in Python and is distributed under the GPLv3 license.

    The project maintains a directory for quickly finding and installing game applications, which allows you to launch games in Linux with one click through a single interface, without worrying about installing dependencies and settings. Runtime components for running games are supplied by the project and are not tied to the distribution kit used. Runtime is a distribution-independent set of libraries that includes components from SteamOS and Ubuntu, as well as various additional libraries.

    Provides the ability to install games distributed through the services GOG, Steam, Epic Games Store, Battle.net, Origin and Uplay. At the same time, Lutris itself acts only as an intermediary and does not sell games, therefore, for commercial games, the user must independently purchase the game in the appropriate service (free games can be launched with one click from the Lutris graphical interface).

  • Hacking tactical narrative-driven RPG Midnight Protocol is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Developed by LuGus Studios who are known for Liftoff: FPV Drone Racing, Midnight Protocol is all about becoming a hacker who recently got doxxed and has been targeted for blackmail by a shadowy branch of government.

    Played entirely with your keyboard, Midnight Protocol is pretty much a game about revenge. You were arrested after your details got leaked, let go due to a lack of solid evidence and now you're jumping right back into the hacking game which is against your parole but that's not going to stop you. It's a game that blends together a turn-based hacking feature, style-wise that part looks like something out of the modern two Deus Ex titles with a bunch of narrative drip-fed to you through emails and other sources.

  • Interplay updating many classic titles on Steam to add support for Linux

    Interplay Entertainment announced today they're updating many of their classic titles to support Linux. A lot of it of course is thanks to the excellent free and open source DOSBox, which allows thousands of classic to play on modern systems without much hassle.

More in Tux Machines

Kernel: IO_uring, AMD, Intel, and Analog Devices

  • IO_uring Network Zero-Copy Send Is Boasting Mighty Speed-Ups - Phoronix

    Early patches providing for IO_uring zero-copy send support for the Linux kernel's networking subsystem is looking extremely promising for greater throughput. Developer Pavel Begunkov posted the set of twelve patches today working on this zero-copy send support for IO_uring with the networking subsystem. These initial patches are marked as a "request for comments" as some items are still being sorted out with the code.

  • AMD-Pstate Driver Updated A 5th Time For Improving Ryzen Power Efficiency On Linux - Phoronix

    Sent out today was the fifth revision to AMD's new "amd-pstate" kernel driver focused on providing enhanced CPU frequency controls for Linux systems. AMD's P-State driver remains under active development for improving the Linux power efficiency for Ryzen (and EPYC) processors. AMD P-State makes use of ACPI CPPC for more informed and finer-grained frequency controls on modern (Zen 2 and newer) processors compared to what is afforded by the existing ACPI CPUFreq frequency scaling driver currently used by AMD Linux systems.

  • Intel Posts Linux Patches Bringing Up Alder Lake N Graphics - Phoronix

    With the graphics driver support for Alder Lake S-series in good shape with Linux 5.16 and the Alder Lake P-series support also coming together for upcoming ADL-based laptops, next up is the Alder Lake N enablement happening for Linux. Alder Lake N for low-end, low-power hardware is now coming together. Though over the existing ADL-S and ADL-P Linux support, it's basically adding in new PCI IDs for ADL-N.

  •  Analog Devices Expands Linux Distribution with Over 1000 Device Drivers to Support the Development of High-Performance Solutions | Business Wire

    As the Linux open-source operating system marks its 30th anniversary, Analog Devices, Inc. (ADI) announces the expansion of its Linux distribution by recognizing over 1000 ADI peripherals supported by in kernel Linux device drivers. Designed to enable the rapid development of embedded solutions, these open-source device drivers streamline the software development process for ADI’s customers, providing access to tested, high-quality software to create innovative solutions across a range of industries, including telecom, industrial, military, aerospace, medical, automotive, security, Internet of Things (IoT), consumer, and more. This portfolio includes products from Maxim Integrated Products, Inc., now part of Analog Devices.

More about those zero-dot users

Yesterday’s article about KDE’s target users generated some interesting discussions about the zero-dot users. One of the most insightful comments I read was that nobody can really target zero-dot users because they operate based on memorization and habit, learning a series of cause-effect relationships: “I click/touch this picture/button, then something useful happens”–even with their smartphones! So even if GNOME and ElementaryOS might be simpler, that doesn’t really matter because it’s not much harder to memorize a random-seeming sequence of clicks or taps in a poor user interface than it is in a good one. I think there’s a lot of truth to this perspective. We have all known zero-dot users who became quite proficient at specific tasks; maybe they learned how to to everything they needed in MS Office, Outlook, or even Photoshop. The key detail is that these folks rely on the visual appearance and structure of the software remaining the same. When the software’s user interface changes–even for the better–they lose critical visual cues and reference points and they can’t find anything anymore. Read more

Distros Without Systemd (New List) and Trolling Against GNU/Linux

Videos/Shows: Deepin, Free Software, GTK, KDE, and More