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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • Linux IP Command with Usage Examples

    The IP command is part of iproute package that is by default installed in Modern Linux distributions. In Linux, the IP command is used to manage and display Network Interfaces, IP Addresses, IP Routing Table, and IP Neighbor Entries. It is commonly used to assign an IP address to a network interface and configure network interface settings.

    In this tutorial, we will learn Linux IP command with usage examples.

  • Jenkins: An introduction to jobs and projects - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will explain what a Jenkins job (or project) is and discuss the different types you may encounter. There are many types available, and it depends on the plugins that you have installed. First, however, this guide will discuss the main types that you will encounter.

  • How to create an RDS cluster on AWS

    AWS RDS (Relational Database Service) is a managed database service provided by AWS to launch highly available, fault-tolerant, automatic failover, and scalable database servers as AWS RDS is a managed service, so it does not provide the shell access to the server. You only get the connection endpoint to connect to the database. AWS RDS provides the following benefits over a self-managed database server.

  • How to Deal with Spaces in File Path Linux

    Using Linux operating system and facing problems while dealing with the spaces in file path? Many Linux users encounter this issue. In the Linux operating system, we can run commands by passing multiple arguments. A space separates each argument. So, if we give the path that has a space, it will be considered two different arguments instead of one a single path.

    In this article, we will dive deeper into how to deal with spaces in file path Linux? But, before that, we need to know the ls command, the uses of the ls command, the syntax for writing the command on the terminal.

  • How can I see all services in Ubuntu?

    System services are the processes or system programs known as ‘daemons’ that continuously run in the background. These services wait for client requests and are responsible for how the system works and how it communicates with other programs. When working in a Linux environment, including Ubuntu, you can easily manage all system services (start, stop, restart, enable at system boot, etc.) through a service manager. Most of the modern Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu, now use a process manager known as ‘systemd’. The systemd is a service manager in the Ubuntu system and used to replace the ‘init’ process. The systemd services manager is controlled by the primary command-line tool ‘systemctl’ command.

    We will show you the various techniques in this tutorial related to listing or viewing all services in the Ubuntu 20.04 system.

  • How do I Copy Multiple Files Using CP in Linux

    CP allows you to copy directories and command files using the command line. With this command, you can transfer multiple files or folders, preserve attribute information and create their backups. CP copies file independently from their originals. So, we can say that the CP command is useful for Linux. People still don’t know how to use this command and search for answers regarding copying multiple files using CP in Linux. That’s why we have written this article to briefly describe how to copy multiple files using CP in Linux.

  • Find Processes Using Most CPU Linux

    Many times such situations come in Linux where we have to deal with application unresponsiveness or sluggish applications due to CPU usage. This happens when our Linux system CPU is very busy. Most of the time, it has to wait until the CPU is free and queue up to process its pending requests.

    Whenever the CPU is completely occupied by the processes of the Linux system, it becomes difficult for the CPU to process other requests. All remaining requests have to be stopped until the CPU is freed. This becomes a huge obstacle.

    We have to use the appropriate command to know the processes which are affecting the CPU. In this article, we will tell how we can solve CPU-related problems with the help of the following commands, as well as see how to find those processes which are using most CPU Linux.

  • Detect SQL Injection (SQLi) and XSS - blackMORE Ops

    LibInjection is a C library to Detect SQL Injection (SQLi) and Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) through lexical analysis of real-world Attacks.

    SQLi and other injection attacks remain the top OWASP and CERT vulnerability. Current detection attempts frequently involve a myriad of regular expressions which are not only brittle and error-prone but also proven by Hanson and Patterson at Black Hat 2005 to never be a complete solution. LibInjection is a new open-source C library that detects SQLi using lexical analysis. With little upfront knowledge of what SQLi is, the algorithm has been trained on tens of thousands of real SQLi attacks and hundreds of millions of user inputs taken from a Top 50 website for high precision and accuracy.

  • Diagnose connectivity issues with the Linux ping command | Opensource.com

    Networked computers are so common these days that most of us take it for granted that a computer on one side of a room can contact one on the other side of the room, much less the other side of the world. When it works as designed, networking is what makes the Internet, the cloud, file shares, media streaming, remote administration, printing, and much more possible. When something goes wrong, it can sometimes be challenging to diagnose. One of the most fundamental diagnostic tools for networked connectivity is the ping command.

More in Tux Machines

GNU/LInux on Desktop/Laptop Miscellany

  • What Is a Physical Kill Switch, and Does Your PC Need One?

    Purism is a company founded on the idea of having strict privacy and security features built into its computers. The Librem 14 is a prime example of this philosophy, and its hardware, firmware, and operating system have been designed with a significantly higher level of paranoia than typical computers. The Librem 14 Linux laptop features multiple physical kill switches, which the company claims absolutely disables the related hardware. There are switches for the webcam and microphone as well as WiFi and Bluetooth. When it comes to the Librem 14 in particular, there are so many additional privacy features that the kill switches really are the least of it, but there are examples of such kill switches in regular laptops that don’t go to such extremes. All the way back in 2018, HP was already shipping laptops with physical kill switches for the webcam. Their Specter laptops included these switches, so hopefully the chances of a hacked webcam recording you when you don’t want it to are virtually zero. Kill switches may not always take the form of a traditional sliding switch on the side of a laptop. It’s entirely possible to integrate the kill switch with a physical, built-in camera shutter.

  • Partaker Intel Core i3-8130U fanless mini PC Win 10 Linux supported $423

    Partaker have created a new fanless mini PC equipped with a wealth of connectivity and capable of supporting both the Microsoft Windows 10 and operating system most Linux distributions depending on your preference. Pricing starts from $423 for the Intel Core i3-8130U processor version although a more affordable Intel Celeron 3865u/3867u/3965u processor version is also available with prices starting from $246. Both are barebone systems meaning that you will need to provide your own memory, storage and operating system, enabling you to tailor the system to your exact requirements.

  • IGEL Releases Support for VMware Workspace ONE Intelligent Hub for Linux

Kernel and Graphics: Kuiper Linux, Rust, Apple, Mesa, and XWayland

  • Custom Linux allows Raspberry Pi to drive ADI peripherals

    Called Kuiper Linux, it incorporates Linux device drivers for ADI products, and supports other hardware including Digilent Zedboard, TerASIC DE10-Nano and Digilent Cora “The reasoning behind creating this distribution is to minimise the barriers to integrating ADI hardware devices into a Linux-based system,” according to the company. “When starting with a generic Linux distribution, the kernel typically would have to be rebuilt with the desired drivers enabled. While this is not difficult for an engineer that is familiar with the process, it can be a daunting task even when everything goes right. ADI Kuiper Linux solves this problem, and includes a host of additional applications, software libraries, and utilities.”

  • Rust takes a major step forward as Linux's second official language | ZDNet

    It wasn't that long ago that the very idea that another language besides C would be used in the Linux kernel would have been laughed at. Things have changed. Today, not only is Rust, the high-level system language moving closer to Linux, it's closer than ever with the next "patch series to add support for Rust as a second language to the Linux kernel."

  • Apple SoC PMGR driver for 5.17
    Hi SoC folks,
    
    Please merge the new PMGR driver for 5.17.
    
    This should not have any hard deps with the previous pulls. The 
    MAINTAINERS change already rode along the DT pull, for simplicity.
    
  • More Apple Silicon M1 Bring-Up On The Way For Linux 5.17 - Phoronix

    The enablement work for supporting Apple's M1 SoC under Linux continues and with the v5.17 kernel next year will be yet more additions. Among the new driver activity for Linux 5.17 is an Apple PMGR driver for controlling the power states. The Apple PMGR block on their SoC has high-level power state controls for SoC devices. At the moment not all features are supported but important step forward for power management with Apple Silicon on Linux.

  • Intel's SWR Removed From Mainline Mesa, More Classic Code Cleaning Continues - Phoronix

    Last Friday Mesa classic drivers were removed from the mainline code-base and punted off to an "Amber" code branch where they will receive whatever attention moving forward. With that classic Mesa code removed, more code cleaning is now happening on top of the tens of thousands of lines of code already removed. Intel's OpenSWR driver has also now been removed from mainline. Since the original classic Mesa drivers consisting of Radeon R100/R200, original Nouveau, and Intel i915 / i965 drivers were removed, more code cleaning can now happen on mainline for code that was just sticking around for these old, rather unmaintained drivers.

  • XWayland Lands DRM Leasing Support To Handle VR Headsets - Phoronix

    Along with XWayland touchpad gestures, another shiny feature was merged this week into X.Org Server Git for XWayland: DRM leasing support! XWayland now has mainline support for the DRM leasing (drm-lease-v1) protocol for allowing X11 clients running through XWayland to lease non-desktop connectors/outputs from the underlying Wayland compositor. This is particularly useful and designed around the needs of virtual reality (VR) head-mounted displays.

Open Hardware/Modding: Raspberry Pi, RISC-V, HiFiBerry, and More

  • Retro Reproduction Captures The Style Of The Sol-20 | Hackaday

    In the early years of the computer revolution, a machine like the Sol-20 really stood out. Where most hobbyist machines had front panels that bristled with toggle switches and LEDs, the Sol-20 was a sleek, all-in-one that looked like an electric typewriter in a walnut-trimmed box. Unfortunately, it was also quite expensive, so not that many were sold. This makes them hard enough to find 40 years later that building his own reproduction Sol-20 is about the only way for [Michael Gardi] to have one of his own.

  • Imagination Catapults into RISC-V

    Imagination unveiled four RISC-V-based “Catapult” CPU cores: two 32-bit MCU cores and two 64-bit designs that run Linux, including an automotive functional safety core. The big news on the first day of the RISC-V Summit in San Francisco was the announcement from Imagination Technologies that it was launching four RISC-V core designs under a Catapult brand. This summer, Imagination revealed it was building RISC-V CPU cores, and it has now announced four Catapult CPU designs. The in-order cores include two 32-bit MCU-like cores and two 64-bit models that run Linux. The UK-based company refers to the four core categories as “dynamic microcontrollers; real-time embedded CPUs; high-performance application CPUs; and functionally safe automotive CPUs.”

  • Adding Optical Audio to the Raspberry Pi with One Chip

    In the home theater space most people would tell you the age of optical audio, known officially as TOSLINK, is over. While at one time they were the standard for surround sound systems, the fiber cables with their glowing red tips have now been largely supplanted by the all-in-one capabilities of HDMI on new TVs and audio receivers. But of course, that doesn’t mean all that TOSLINK-compatible hardware that’s in the field simply disappears. If you’re looking to connect a Raspberry Pi to the optical port of your AV system, [Nick Sayer] has you covered. His “TOSLINK Transceiver Hat” utilizes a WM8804 chip from Cirrus Logic to go from the Pi’s I2S audio output to S/PDIF. From there the signal goes directly into the TOSLINK input and output modules, which have the appropriate fiber optic hardware and drivers built-in. All you have to do from a software standpoint is enable a boot overlay intended for a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) from HiFiBerry.

  • Guitar Pickguard Adds MIDI Capabilities

    For a standard that has been in use since the 1980s, MIDI is still one of the most dominant forces on the musical scene even today. It’s fast, flexible, and offers a standard recognized industry-wide over many different types of electronic instruments. Even things which aren’t instruments can be turned into musical devices like the infamous banana keyboard via the magic of MIDI, and it also allows augmentation of standard instruments with other capabilities like this guitar with a MIDI interface built into the pick guard. [Ezra] is the creator of this unique musical instrument which adds quite a few capabilities to his guitar. The setup is fairly straightforward: twelve wires run to the pick guard which are set up as capacitive sensors and correspond with a note on the chromatic scale. Instead of using touchpads, using wires allows him to bend away the “notes” that he doesn’t need for any particular piece of music. The wires are tied back to an Adafruit Feather 32u4 microcontroller behind the neck of the guitar which also has a few selectors for changing the way that the device creates tones. He can set the interface to emit single notes or continuously play notes, change the style, can change their octave, and plenty of other features as well.

Firefox 96 Enters Public Beta Testing with More Performance and Security Improvements

Firefox 96 isn’t a major update, but it’s the first release of the open-source web browser in 2022 and it introduces several performance and security improvements to make your browsing experience more enjoyable, more reliable, and much safer. For example, the upcoming Firefox release significantly reduces the main thread load, significantly improves noise-suppression and auto-gain-control, slightly improves echo-cancellation, and enforces the Cookie Policy: Same-Site=lax option by default to protect users against Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) attacks. Read more