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SUSE/OpenSUSE: Digest of YaST Development Sprints, SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1, and Documentation by Meike Chabowski

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  • Digest of YaST Development Sprints 133 & 134

    Let us start by quoting our latest report: “regarding the management of users, we hope to report big improvements in the next blog post”. Time has indeed come and we can now announce we brought the revamped users management described in this monographic blog post to the last parts of YaST that were still not taking advantage of the new approach. The changes are receiving an extra round of testing with the help of the Quality Assurance team at SUSE before we submit them to openSUSE Tumbleweed. When that happens, both the interactive YaST module to manage users and groups and its corresponding command line interface (not to be confused with the ncurses-powered text mode) will start using useradd and friends to manage users, groups and the related configurations.

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1 is Generally Available

    Today, we are proud to announce the release of SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1 – a lightweight and secure operating system built for containerized and virtualized workloads.

    [...]

    SLE Micro can be used as a single-node container host, Kubernetes cluster node, single-node KVM virtualization host or in public cloud. Since its built to scale, customers can incorporate SLE Micro into their digital transformation plans – whether at the edge or supporting edge deployments with mainframes – in a way that allows them to transition workload designs from monolithic to microservices, at their own pace. They can start with container workloads or virtualize their current legacy workloads, then move to containerized workloads when they are ready, with no change in the underlying system platform.

  • SUSE Expands Computing Possibilities Beyond the Edge with SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1
  • SUSE Expands Computing Possibilities Beyond the Edge with SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1
  • Document formats – There is choice [Ed: Meike Chabowski on formats of documentation files in SUSE]

    For publishing large documentation projects, DocBook is the ideal framework. It consists of a language (DocBook XML) and a set of stylesheets to translate this language into different output formats such as HTML, PDF, and EPUB.
    The stylesheets define the layout you want to apply when transforming the XML sources into output formats. For SUSE documentation, we wrote our own XSLT stylesheets to ensure the corporate design is properly reflected.

    The language DocBook XML is based on the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and defines the content in a semantic way through elements like in HTML. DocBook itself is written as a schema that defines the element names and the content and where they can appear. The DocBook schema is used to fulfill two tasks: guided editing and validation.

    Guided editing is done via an XML editor (such as oXygen, Vim or Emacs). The editor reads in the DocBook schema and suggests which elements are allowed in the current context. Validation gives hints about structural errors in an XML document; this could, for example, be a missing element.

From spamnil's site

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1 Comes With Edge-Focused Security Features

    SUSE has announced the availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) Micro 5.1, a lightweight and secure operating system built for containerized and virtualized workloads. SLE Micro 5.1 adds edge-focused security features such as secure device onboarding and live patching, and it enables the modernizing of workloads with support for IBM Z and LinuxONE.

SUSE heads for the Edge Computing

    • SUSE heads for the Edge Computing with SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1

      Once upon a time, we got Linux distributions because they were the Swiss-Army Knives of operating systems. They came with every program you might ever need. You can still get those, of course. But, lately, businesses have been wanting lightweight, secure Linux distros for cloud and edge computing containers and virtual machines (VM)s. To meet that demand, the latest business-class Linux is SUSE's new SUSE Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1 (SLE Micro).

SUSE announces Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1

  • SUSE announces Linux Enterprise Micro 5.1

    SUSE a provider of enterprise-grade open source solutions, has announced the availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) Micro 5.1, a lightweight and secure operating system built for containerised and virtualised workloads. SLE Micro 5.1 adds edge-focused security features such as secure device onboarding and live patching, and it enables the modernising of workloads with support for IBM Z and LinuxONE.

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