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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • How To Install AMD Radeon Driver on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install AMD Radeon Driver on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Installing AMD Radeon drivers on the Ubuntu system is an easy task that can be done in less than a minute. Radeon driver is needed by your AMD Radeon Graphics GPU to function with better performance. Some Linux distributions offer the proprietary driver pre-packaged as part of its standard package repository making the entire AMD Radeon Linux Driver procedure extremely easy to follow.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the FreeOffice on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • What you need to know about disks and disk partitions in Linux – LinuxBSDos.com

    This is an update to A beginner’s guide to disks and disk partitions in Linux, which itself was an update to Guide to disks and disk partitions in Linux. It is intended to be an absolute beginner’s guide to understanding how disks and disk partitions are handled in Linux. This update adds info on NVMe SSDs.

    If you are migrating from Windows to Linux and are attempting to install any Linux distribution alongside Windows 10/11 on your computer, this article should come in handy. You’ll read about hard drive naming convention in Linux, how they are partitioned, partition tables, file systems and mount points.

    By the time you are through reading this, you should have a pretty good idea of what you are doing when installing your next Linux distribution on your laptop or desktop computer. An understanding of all the aspects concerning how a disk is referenced and partitioned will put you in a better position to troubleshoot installation and disk-related problems. Most of the highly technical terms associated with this subject have been omitted, so this should be an easy read.

  • How To Install PrestaShop on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install PrestaShop on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, PrestaShop is a freemium, open-source e-commerce software. It lets you start your own online store with secure payments, multiple shipping methods, custom themes, and more. PrestaShop written in PHP is highly customizable, supports all the major payment services, is translated in many languages and localized for many countries, has a fully responsive design (both front and back-office), etc.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of PrestaShop e-commerce software on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • How to Install Asterisk VoIP Server on Debian 11 | 10 - Linux Shout

    In this tutorial, we will discuss some of the steps and commands to install the Asterisk VoIP server on Debian 11 Bullseye or 10 Buster using the terminal to call over Android or iPhone using a local network.

  • How to install Docker-ce on Ubuntu 21.10 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial am going to show you how you can install Docker-ce on Ubuntu 21.10.

    Docker is a set of platform as a service product that uses OS-level virtualization to deliver software in packages called containers. Containers are usually isolated from one another and bundled their own software libraries and configuration files, they can communicate with each other through well-defined channels.

    Docker makes it possible to get more apps running on the same old servers and also makes it easy to package and ship programs.

  • How to Uninstall Software On Ubuntu

    Regardless of the operating system you are using; there are multiple reasons why you might want to uninstall software. Maybe the software has become corrupted, and it doesn’t function the same as before, or your application is now virus-ridden, so uninstalling it is safe. There are times when you don’t use the software anymore, so you uninstall it to make space.

    We all know that Ubuntu and other Linux distros are different from the commonly used Windows. Users migrating from Windows to Ubuntu can find it hard navigating even the basic stuff. Uninstalling software can be tricky, so this article will help you understand the different ways you can bin software in Ubuntu.

  • How to Mount USB Drive on Linux

    We live in the modern age of technology where there are multiple important variables to keep track of. But arguably, the biggest variable today is “data”. With some maturing and emerging technologies, everything is being centered around the quantity and quality of data. Thus, gathering and protecting data has become paramount.

    These days, it’s quite common to see people carrying their data around at all times. Different devices and technologies are used for this purpose, including a certain device called USB (Universal Serial Bus).

    A USB is an electronic communication protocol (ECP) most commonly used for computer accessories and other small-end electronic devices, either for data transfer or power transfer. Although USBs are being phased out slowly due to technologies such as “Cloud Computing”, there is a sense of privacy and security with using USBs that you don’t get with other methods.

    Accessing USBs is straightforward. It is a plug-and-use device, so the stick only needs to be connected to your computer via a USB port. Usually, USBs mount themselves automatically to your system regardless of the operating system, but there are instances where there is a problem, and the USB refuses to connect.

    For such times, if you are using a Linux distro, it is best to use the Terminal and execute your way to mount the USB in your computer. This article will be guiding you on how exactly you can achieve this task.

    Although it is time-consuming, once you know how to mount a USB in Linux, you will feel lightened, and it will be easier for you to perform it the next time when needed. So follow these instructions to get a proper hang of it.

  • How do I change my homepage in WordPress?

    This brief tutorial explains how to change the homepage in WordPress.
    After reading this tutorial, you’ll learn the two common ways to define your website homepage by editing WordPress settings. This article also includes instructions to create a new page to set as a homepage or a posts page if you have not created a home page.

    All steps described in this tutorial include real screenshots and can be followed by any WordPress level user.

  • How do I Rename a Column in MySQL?

    MySQL is a popular database management system that provides the backbone for a huge portion of today’s internet. Developed and maintained by Oracle, MySQL is an open-source RDBMS (relational database management system) with a client-server model. It offers secure database storage, fast performance, and powerful features.

    This guide will showcase how to rename a column in MySQL.

  • What Are Environment Variables in Linux? Everything You Need to Know

    If you've been using Linux for a while, you may be wondering how to set certain parameters from the command line that can keep your settings across programs. Environment variables are how you do this.

    By the end, you'll have a deep understanding of what environment variables are, and how you can create such variables from the command line.

  • SysMonTask – SparkyLinux

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: SysMonTask

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 21.04 (Hirsute Hippo) Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 Now

Dubbed by Canonical as the “Hirsute Hippo,” Ubuntu 21.04 was released nine months ago, on April 22nd, 2021. It was the first Ubuntu release to use the next-generation Wayland display server by default for its Ubuntu Desktop flavor, which uses a modified version of the GNOME desktop environment. Ubuntu 21.04 didn’t make the plunge into the GNOME 40 desktop environment series due to its redesigned Activities Overview, but it did ship with support for GNOME 40 apps while being built on top of the older GNOME 3.38 desktop environment series. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Supplino is a variable benchtop power supply that you can build yourself | Arduino Blog

    Working with electronics requires access to stable power in a variety of voltages. Some components require 3.3V and others require 5V. Still others need 9V or 12V — there are many possibilities. You could keep a variety of wall warts on hand, but a variable benchtop power supply is a more convenient option. Supplino is one choice and this guide from Giovanni Bernardo and Paolo Loberto will walk you through how to build one. Supplino can accept anything from 4 to 40 volts and can output anything from 1.25 to 36 volts, with a maximum of 5A. An XH-M401 module with an XL4016E1 DC-DC buck converter handles the voltage regulation. Technically, you could use that alone to power your components. But the addition of an Arduino Nano board (or Nano Every) makes the experience far friendlier. It monitors the power supply output and drives a 1.8″ 128×160 TFT LCD screen, which displays the present voltage, amperage, and wattage.

  • Relocating Fedora's RPM database [LWN.net]

    The deadlines for various kinds of Fedora 36 change proposals have mostly passed at this point, which led to something of a flurry of postings to the distribution's devel mailing list over the last month. One of those, for a seemingly fairly innocuous relocation of the RPM database from /var to /usr, came in right at the buzzer for system-wide changes on December 29. There were, of course, other things going on around that time, holidays, vacations, and so forth, so the discussion was relatively muted until recently. Proponents have a number of reasons why they would like to see the move, but there is resistance, as well, that is due, at least in part, to the longstanding "tradition" of the location for the database.

  • CPU Isolation – A practical example – by SUSE Labs (part 5)
  • How to install Mantis bug tracker on Debian 11?

    Hello friends. In this post, you will learn how to install Mantis Bug Tracker on Debian 11.

Server: MongoDB vs. DynamoDB, Mirantis, and More

  • MongoDB vs. DynamoDB: What you need to know

    NoSQL databases have become more popular because of the need for more flexible backend solutions. These databases run applications that require a more flexible data structure than traditional structured databases can provide. Robust feature-rich NoSQL database platforms famous for NoSQL databases include MongoDB and DynamoDB. This article guide will compare these two databases to help you choose the right one for your project.

  • Mirantis brings secure registries to Kubernetes distros | ZDNet

    Mirantis Secure Registry, formerly Docker Trusted Registry, provides an enterprise-grade container registry solution. You can use this as a foundation to build a secure software supply chain. It does this by providing you with access to a container image registry that has enhanced levels of security beyond that of public registries. This, in turn, gives you more control over this critical part of their software supply chain. The comprehensive, built-in security enables users to verify and trust the automated operations and integration with Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) pipelines to speed up application testing and delivery. You can use MSR alongside your other apps in any standard Kubernetes 1.20 and above distribution, via standard Helm techniques. While the new MSR is no longer integrated with Mirantis Kubernetes Engine (MKE) as it was earlier, it still runs as well as ever on MKE as it does with any other supported Kubernetes distribution.

  • How North Dakota Is More Like Windows than UNIX

    If your official name is YATES, you can't (and presumably needn't) file a petition to change it to Yates. "Petitioners have offered no authority or reasoned argument that there is any legal significance to the capitalization of their names."

  • The Success of ‘Open-hearted’ Partnerships in the Cloud | SUSE Communities

    The future is open — and it’s better together. At SUSE, we pride ourselves on our partnerships, and sometimes what we can achieve together surpasses even our greatest hopes. That’s what our award-winning, cloud-based, high-performance computing (HPC) partnership with UberCloud, Dassault Systèmes, and Google Cloud achieved, by enabling 3DT Holdings researchers to create an affordable, real-time heart surgery simulator for physicians to use when it matters most. This is an ongoing relationship with the Living Heart Project that we think is just the beginning of what this ground-breaking research can achieve — and the lives it can save.

Programming Leftovers

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?