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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Fills a Gap with OpenShift Data Science [Ed: "Red Hat is a sponsor of The New Stack," it says at the bottom and this site does puff pieces about it sponsor. This is corruption of journalism by IBM, just like Microsoft.]

    Following its initial launch earlier this year, Red Hat has released Red Hat OpenShift Data Science as a “field trial”. The managed cloud service provides enterprises with an environment tailored for artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) on Red Hat OpenShift.

  • Technically Speaking (S1E10): Building practical self-healing IT - Invidious

    When IT operations fail, it would be great if our infrastructure could use automation and machine learning to simply fix itself. Self-healing infrastructure is a lofty goal, but how practical is it? In this episode, Red Hat CTO Chris Wright is joined by Mike Dobozy to talk about building an event driven automation solution that lays the foundation for more complex self-healing infrastructure. With artificial intelligence and machine learning, DevOps has evolved, and adding self-healing capabilities to the organization's existing infrastructure can have immediate benefits. But once we start to look at more complicated problems that require more data and more timing-based or complex event processing, how do we cut through the noise and make it simpler to solve problems? Join us for another Technically Speaking with Chris Wright to learn more about how event-driven automation is being used to build self-healing solutions and is helping us realize a future with truly closed-loop automation and autonomic systems.

  • Red Hat and Celonis Make Hybrid Multicloud a Reality for Intelligent Business Execution

    Red Hat, IBM and Celonis today announced the general availability of Celonis Execution Management System (EMS) on Red Hat OpenShift Service on Amazon Web Services (AWS) (ROSA) as a managed cloud service. This enables organizations to take full advantage of the collaboration and unique expertise of each company in a multicloud environment.

  • Open source software is the heart of the technology behind cloud computing, Red Hat CEO says

    Paul Cormier, president and CEO of Red Hat, joins 'The Exchange' to discuss the future of cloud computing.

  • IT leadership: 9 powerful ways to coach your rising stars

    Today's IT leaders and managers be fluent in an ever-growing list of technology fundamentals, plus think and operate as part of the business, creating connections and building trust with key stakeholders. “IT leaders need to become even more facile with the language of business, and they have to go deeper than that to strengthen their empathy muscle — recognizing how [technology] impacts a stakeholder, recognizing the pain around it, and communicating that they recognize it,” says Elizabeth Freedman, head of consulting at executive coaching and assessment firm Bates.

    Unfortunately, the next generation of tech leaders may lack some of the related skills — and it’s not necessarily their own fault. They’ve been busy during the past two years, to say the least. “That next level of leader is just not ready to lead in [these] ways,” Freedman says. “Their heads are down.”

    One-on-one coaching is critical to grooming more fully-formed IT leaders.
    Rising IT professionals need clear direction, correction, and encouragement to mature into the multi-faceted business leaders that their organizations require. While training and classes may help, one-on-one coaching is critical to grooming more fully-formed IT leaders.

  • Top one-line Linux commands, customize VM images, and more tips for sysadmins | Enable Sysadmin

    November 2021 was another excellent month for Enable Sysadmin. During the month, we published 23 new articles and received nearly 720,000 reads from more than 488,000 readers across the site.

    Today, we are looking back at our top 10 articles of November to give you a chance to catch up on any of the great content you might have missed. In this list, you will see various topics covered, and we are confident that some, if not all, will be of interest to you.

  • Introducing CentOS Stream 9

    CentOS Stream is a continuous-delivery distribution providing each point-release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Before a package is formally introduced to CentOS Stream, it undergoes a battery of tests and checks—both automated and manual—to ensure it meets the stringent standards for inclusion in RHEL. Updates posted to Stream are identical to those posted to the unreleased minor version of RHEL. The aim? For CentOS Stream to be as fundamentally stable as RHEL itself.

    To achieve this stability, each major release of Stream starts from a stable release of Fedora Linux—In CentOS Stream 9, this begins with Fedora 34, which is the same code base from which RHEL 9 is built. As updated packages pass testing and meet standards for stability, they are pushed into CentOS Stream as well as the nightly build of RHEL. What CentOS Stream looks like now is what RHEL will look like in the near future.

  • CentOS Stream 9 Now Available To Live On The Bleeding-Edge Of RHEL9 - Phoronix

    While there has been CentOS Stream 8, following last month's RHEL 9 Beta there is now official availability of CentOS Stream 9.

    [...]

    Or there is this visualization from the CentOS Project showing the trajectory of CentOS Stream 9 from its branching off Fedora 34 through the future in being the leading edge of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9 development.

  • Fedora 36 May Support FS-VERITY Integrity/Authenticity Verification For RPMs - Phoronix

    Fedora 36 may support using the Linux kernel's fs-verity code for allowing some interesting integrity and authenticity use-cases around RPM packages.

    The Linux kernel's fs-verity module provides authenticity protection for read-only files for transparently verifying their integrity and authenticity when those files are on supported file-systems. FS-VERITY allows bulding a Merkle tree for a given file and that to persist with the file and later on the file can then be verified against that Merkle tree. This can allow for detecting corrupted files whether accidental or intentional of malicious nature, auditing of files, and other similar security use-cases.

  • Introduction to the Node.js reference architecture, Part 6: Choosing web frameworks

    One of the key choices you make when building an enterprise Node.js application is the web framework that will serve as its foundation. As part of our Node.js reference architecture effort, we've pulled together many internal Red Hat and IBM teams to discuss the web frameworks they've had success with. From our meetings, we've learned that most of the developers we spoke to are still happy with Express.js. This web framework has long been considered the default for Node.js, and it holds that place in our reference architecture as well.

    However, Express.js is considered to be in maintenance mode. Thus, as part of the process of developing the reference architecture, we analyzed some data on web framework usage to try to get an idea of what might come next. In this article, you'll learn why Express.js is still a good fit for many Node.js developers and what the future could hold.

  • Patches welcome! How to contribute upstream to glibc

    By the time Red Hat customers run one of our products, it already has had a long history of development, testing, review, and other assorted refinements, both internally and across its many related upstream projects.

    Most of our customers are happy to stay at their end of this long road, but for the curious, here's a high-level end-to-end overview. While this process will vary from upstream project to upstream project, the following is specific to glibc, including glibc's new CI/CD automated patch review system!

  • PHP version 7.4.27RC1, 8.0.14RC1 and 8.1.1RC1 - Remi's RPM repository - Blog

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests, and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 8.1.1RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-php81-test repository for Fedora 33-34 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 8.0.14RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 35 or in the remi-php80-test repository for Fedora 33-34 and Enterprise Linux.

  • Outreachy Interns introduction – December 2021 to March 2022

    Last week, Outreachy announced the interns selected for duration December 2021 to March 2022, and we have three interns with us. This blog introduces them to the community. If you see them around, please welcome them and share some virtual cookies.

    Outreachy is a paid, remote internship program that helps traditionally underrepresented people in tech make their first contributions to Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) communities. Fedora Project is participating in this round of Outreachy as a mentoring organization. We asked our Outreachy interns to tell us some things about themselves!

  • Fedora Community Blog: CPE Weekly Update – Week of November 29th – December 3rd

    This is a weekly report from the CPE (Community Platform Engineering) Team.

  • Anonymize data in real time with KEDA and Rook | Red Hat Developer

    Data privacy and data protection have become increasingly important globally. More and more jurisdictions have passed data privacy protection laws to regulate operators that process, transfer, and store data. Data pseudonymization and anonymization are two common practices that the IT industry turns to in order to comply with such laws.

    In this article, you'll learn about an open source cloud-native solution architecture we developed that allows managed data service providers to anonymize data automatically and in real time.

  • What is Ansible Automation Hub and why should you use it?

    Many Ansible users know about Ansible Galaxy—the Ansible project’s community repository for sharing Ansible content. While Ansible Galaxy is great for testing the latest and greatest developer content, it’s difficult to know which content is supported, and which content is people just uploading stuff. In a lot of ways, it’s like an app store with no rules.

    This is where Ansible Automation Hub comes in.

  • OpenShift Security Hardening for the healthcare industry

    In all industries, data lies at the heart of an organization, and data needs stringent, consistent and restricted access controls for risk reduction and protection against cybersecurity threats.

    It’s important to secure all sensitive data, of course, but extra care must be taken to ensure that personally identifiable information (PII) and personal health information (PHI) are properly protected. At the same time, that information also has to be available for use by authorized people and applications.

    There are a number of different strategies healthcare organizations can use to avoid data leaks. Here we present a prioritized list of measures for hardening Red Hat OpenShift using information from the OpenShift Security Guidelines and other sources.

SJVN: Red Hat's CentOS Stream 9 Linux arrives

  • Red Hat's CentOS Stream 9 Linux arrives

    Almost a year ago to the day, Red Hat changed CentOS from being a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) clone to being a developmental rolling Linux distribution, CentOS Stream. Many users weren't happy. As a result, several replacement CentOS/RHEL clones, such as AlmaLinux and Rocky Linux, got their start. But, Red Hat continued with its plans to use CentOS to foreshadow the next edition of RHEL. Now, the new CentOS project is showing off it's latest and greatest in its first totally new release: CentOS 9.

CentOS Stream 9 is Now Generally Available

  • CentOS Stream 9 is Now Generally Available

    The release of CentOS Stream 9 has been carried out before CentOS Linux 8 expires at the end of this year.

    CentOS Stream saw the light of day in 2019 and fundamentally changed the work on the distribution. At the end of 2020, the announcement that Red Hat will shift its focus from CentOS Linux to CentOS Stream caused heated discussions.

    As you can imagine, many users were not satisfied with this decision. As a result, some replacement CentOS clones such as AlmaLinux and Rocky Linux soon came into play, which are now also generally available.

    Now the new CentOS project is showing off the latest and greatest in the first all-new release of CentOS Stream 9.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 21.04 (Hirsute Hippo) Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 Now

Dubbed by Canonical as the “Hirsute Hippo,” Ubuntu 21.04 was released nine months ago, on April 22nd, 2021. It was the first Ubuntu release to use the next-generation Wayland display server by default for its Ubuntu Desktop flavor, which uses a modified version of the GNOME desktop environment. Ubuntu 21.04 didn’t make the plunge into the GNOME 40 desktop environment series due to its redesigned Activities Overview, but it did ship with support for GNOME 40 apps while being built on top of the older GNOME 3.38 desktop environment series. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Supplino is a variable benchtop power supply that you can build yourself | Arduino Blog

    Working with electronics requires access to stable power in a variety of voltages. Some components require 3.3V and others require 5V. Still others need 9V or 12V — there are many possibilities. You could keep a variety of wall warts on hand, but a variable benchtop power supply is a more convenient option. Supplino is one choice and this guide from Giovanni Bernardo and Paolo Loberto will walk you through how to build one. Supplino can accept anything from 4 to 40 volts and can output anything from 1.25 to 36 volts, with a maximum of 5A. An XH-M401 module with an XL4016E1 DC-DC buck converter handles the voltage regulation. Technically, you could use that alone to power your components. But the addition of an Arduino Nano board (or Nano Every) makes the experience far friendlier. It monitors the power supply output and drives a 1.8″ 128×160 TFT LCD screen, which displays the present voltage, amperage, and wattage.

  • Relocating Fedora's RPM database [LWN.net]

    The deadlines for various kinds of Fedora 36 change proposals have mostly passed at this point, which led to something of a flurry of postings to the distribution's devel mailing list over the last month. One of those, for a seemingly fairly innocuous relocation of the RPM database from /var to /usr, came in right at the buzzer for system-wide changes on December 29. There were, of course, other things going on around that time, holidays, vacations, and so forth, so the discussion was relatively muted until recently. Proponents have a number of reasons why they would like to see the move, but there is resistance, as well, that is due, at least in part, to the longstanding "tradition" of the location for the database.

  • CPU Isolation – A practical example – by SUSE Labs (part 5)
  • How to install Mantis bug tracker on Debian 11?

    Hello friends. In this post, you will learn how to install Mantis Bug Tracker on Debian 11.

Server: MongoDB vs. DynamoDB, Mirantis, and More

  • MongoDB vs. DynamoDB: What you need to know

    NoSQL databases have become more popular because of the need for more flexible backend solutions. These databases run applications that require a more flexible data structure than traditional structured databases can provide. Robust feature-rich NoSQL database platforms famous for NoSQL databases include MongoDB and DynamoDB. This article guide will compare these two databases to help you choose the right one for your project.

  • Mirantis brings secure registries to Kubernetes distros | ZDNet

    Mirantis Secure Registry, formerly Docker Trusted Registry, provides an enterprise-grade container registry solution. You can use this as a foundation to build a secure software supply chain. It does this by providing you with access to a container image registry that has enhanced levels of security beyond that of public registries. This, in turn, gives you more control over this critical part of their software supply chain. The comprehensive, built-in security enables users to verify and trust the automated operations and integration with Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) pipelines to speed up application testing and delivery. You can use MSR alongside your other apps in any standard Kubernetes 1.20 and above distribution, via standard Helm techniques. While the new MSR is no longer integrated with Mirantis Kubernetes Engine (MKE) as it was earlier, it still runs as well as ever on MKE as it does with any other supported Kubernetes distribution.

  • How North Dakota Is More Like Windows than UNIX

    If your official name is YATES, you can't (and presumably needn't) file a petition to change it to Yates. "Petitioners have offered no authority or reasoned argument that there is any legal significance to the capitalization of their names."

  • The Success of ‘Open-hearted’ Partnerships in the Cloud | SUSE Communities

    The future is open — and it’s better together. At SUSE, we pride ourselves on our partnerships, and sometimes what we can achieve together surpasses even our greatest hopes. That’s what our award-winning, cloud-based, high-performance computing (HPC) partnership with UberCloud, Dassault Systèmes, and Google Cloud achieved, by enabling 3DT Holdings researchers to create an affordable, real-time heart surgery simulator for physicians to use when it matters most. This is an ongoing relationship with the Living Heart Project that we think is just the beginning of what this ground-breaking research can achieve — and the lives it can save.

Programming Leftovers

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?