Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

LibreOffice: The Klingons and Interslavs are already here

Filed under
LibO

We happily report that Klingons have – at this point – not taken over control of the LibreOffice bug-tracker.

While Klingon language support still ranks somewhat low among issues thought not to be essential, the federation that is LibreOffice 7.3 will also bring Interslavic support to the mix when released come early February.

Since you were wondering, Interslavic is an artificial language meant to operate in the cross-section of Slavic interlingualism.

Targ-herders everywhere are reportedly mildly pleased. The synergy in KSL (Klingon as second language) regions is a potato harvest that we can all appreciate.

Undeterred by the confines of a monogalactic community of translators, LibreOffice numbers are growing. Hundreds of millions or earthlings alone now have powerful tools honed in their native languages.

Read more

'IwlIj jachjaj! Incoming LibreOffice 7.3 to support Klingon..

  • 'IwlIj jachjaj! Incoming LibreOffice 7.3 to support Klingon and Interslavic

    There's a good chance you've heard of LibreOffice – OK, yes, and Klingon. Interslavic, maybe not. Here's why some of you should care.

    LibreOffice is the continuation of the moribund OpenOffice project, which had to change its name because Oracle claimed the trademark on the old name.

    If you're still using OpenOffice, don't. It's basically dead. Download LibreOffice, uninstall OpenOffice, then install LibreOffice instead. It's completely compatible because it's the same program, just a more modern version – smaller, faster, less buggy, and more secure.

    It's even handy if you have a legit copy of Microsoft Office. In your correspondent's experience, it's a lot better at recovering corrupted or damaged MS Office files than MS Office itself. (It's also free, resistant to MS Office viruses, and legal even for commercial use.)

    And as for the languages? The website already lists 51, and more are coming. That's a tiny fraction of the world's 7,000-plus languages, and a language goes extinct every two weeks. For small communities trying to keep minority languages alive, being able to write in it is very important.

Open-source software LibreOffice to add Star Trek's Klingon lang

  • Open-source software LibreOffice to add Star Trek's Klingon language to 7.3 update

    Beginning in February, open source writing platform LibreOffice 7.3 promises to include support for two “made up” languages: Interslavic and Klingon.

    According to a report from neowin.com, the decision to include the Klingon and Interslavic languages is an effort to streamline user workload by allowing users to work with the languages without the need to use alternative translation. The Klingon language was developed for the Star Trek franchise by linguist Marc Orkrand. Interslavic, on the other hand, is meant to “bridge the language gap between Slavic languages such as Russian and Polish.”

LibreOffice 7.3 will ship with support for two made-up languages

  • LibreOffice 7.3 will ship with support for two made-up languages; Klingon and Interslavic

    The popular open-source office suite, LibreOffice, will support two constructed (made-up) languages from early February with the launch of LibreOffice 7.3. The two languages are Star Trek’s Klingon – the language of the Klingons, and Interslavic, a language that's supposed to bridge the language gap between Slavic languages such as Russian and Polish.

    With LibreOffice mainly being funded by donations, some of its benefactors will be no doubt wondering if their money isn’t being wasted on the implementation of these languages due to the fact that they have a tiny number of speakers. In response to this concern, The Document Foundation (which runs LibreOffice) said that it’s important to remember the community develops the suite so individual contributors can work on items that are important to them, therefore, an individual working on a Klingon translation doesn't stop the wider project from working on other important tasks.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to Connect Wi-Fi using Nmcli in Linux

    Why use the Network-command-line Manager’s interface? Sometimes Ubuntu Network Manager behaves strangely, and you may be unable to connect to any Wi-Fi Hotspot using the GUI (Graphical user interface). The Network Manager may fail to start, and even after manually restarting the service through the terminal, you may still have difficulties connecting to any Wi-Fi Hotspot, even a previously recognized and stored home network. I encountered same problem on dual boot configurations and standalone Linux installs, and it was quite inconvenient, particularly during the WFH (Work from home) phase that we’re all going through.

  • How to Add Comments to UFW Rules

    In an earlier article we discussed how to add comments to iptables rules for clarity and documentation. In our opinion it is a good practice to comment anything someone else may have to work on in the future. Using comments in scripting is a common practice for good reason. We decided to write a quick tip on how to add a comment to UFW (Uncomplicated Firewall) rules. I am not a huge fan of UFW or Firewalld. In my opinion they make managing netfilter harder, not easier. That is because I started using iptables over 20 years ago. I am very comfortable with it and tend to know the necessary syntax off the top of my head. That being said, adding a comment to UFW rules is much more intuitive than any other iptables front end.

  • How to Install Drupal 9 on Ubuntu 22.04 - LinuxTuto

    Drupal is an open-source and popular content management tool that is the foundation of many websites across the internet. It has great standard features, like easy content authoring, reliable performance, and excellent security. Flexibility and modularity are some of the core principles that set it apart from the rest. In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Drupal 9 on your Ubuntu 22.04 OS.

  • How to migrate from Blogger to WordPress

    Blogger.com, as its name suggest is a blog service. Is very popular and it’s owned by google. You may want to take full control of your blog by setting up a WordPress on your server. But you still need your content: in this entry I’ll show you how to migrate from blogger to wordpress. I’m assuming you already have a brand new WordPress installation. If not, here on unixcop.com we have several articles about wordpress.

  • How to install Inkscape 1.2 on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Inkscape 1.2 on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • What is AWS CloudTrail and how to use it

The 10 Best Linux Apps for Musicians

If you're a musician of any kind, from beginner to professional, Linux provides an amazing assortment of free, yet powerful, platforms and applications that will boost your productivity and help you to show off your creativity. Don't let the fact that these apps are free wrongly influence your judgment. They are high-quality, professional-grade applications that rival even the most well-known, high-priced, commercial applications. These are 10 of the best Linux apps for musicians of all levels. Read more

GNOME and KDE: This Week in GNOME, Qt6 and KF6

  • #44 Five Across · This Week in GNOME

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from May 13 to May 20.

  • Okteta making a small step to Qt6 | Attracted by virtual constructs

    Old, but stable, even more in when it comes to the feature set, and still getting its polishing now and then: your simple editor for the raw data of files, named Okteta. What started in 2003 as a hex editing widget library for KDE3 (and Qt3), of course named KHexEdit (to be confused with the unrelated hex editor program that was part of KDE at that time), it turned into a first dedicated application by the title Okteta during the years 2006 to 2008 for KDE4 (and Qt4). From there on a small set of features was added once in a while, most impressively Alexander Richardson’s Structures tool in 2010,. Until then in 2013 the port to Qt5/KF5 was done (also to a good degree by Alexander). After that things had settled, the program working properly when needed, otherwise just left in the corner of the storage. Now, nearly 2 decades after the first lines were written, the next port is to be done, to Qt6 and KF6. And this time the actual port is just amazingly boring: changing a few “Qt5” to “Qt6” in the buildsystem (and later some “KF5” to “KF6” once KF6 is ready), adding Qt6::Core5Compat as helper library for 1-2 classes that had not yet been substituted, adding a “const” to the argument of an overridden virtual method, adapting some “QStringList” forward declarations… and done.

The 5 best Application Launchers for Ubuntu

Every operating system comes with an application launcher where you have to mouse over the entire menu to launch an application. But, unlike other operating systems, Linux allows us to install other launchers as an alternative. In this post, We came up with the five best application launchers for Ubuntu and their installation process. Ubuntu has a default application launcher, i.e., GNOME Shell application overview. If you are a beginner or a tech professional, browsing the entire menu to launch an application is quite bothersome. Linux community offers a wide variety of application launchers. From a rich UX-based to a bare minimum, Linux has everything to offer. These application launchers offer many themes and come with a lot of customization. Choosing the right application launcher as per your need might be difficult. That’s why we came up with the five best application launchers. Here are the top 5 application launchers for your Ubuntu. Read more