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Security and Microsoft FUD

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Microsoft
Security
  • Security updates for Monday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (chromium, firefox-esr, ghostscript, libreswan, prosody, sphinxsearch, thunderbird, and uriparser), Fedora (cryptsetup, flatpak, kernel, mingw-uriparser, python-celery, python-kombu, and uriparser), Mageia (htmldoc, mbedtls, openexr, perl-CPAN, systemd, thunderbird, and vim), openSUSE (chromium and prosody), Red Hat (httpd, kernel, and samba), Scientific Linux (kernel), Slackware (expat), SUSE (ghostscript), and Ubuntu (pillow).

  • Domestic CCTV and audio recording | Pen Test Partners

    Last week, we had BBC Morning Live in to film a piece on the legalities and challenges of domestic CCTV systems. You can watch it on iPlayer here, starting at 10:30.

    It was sparked by a conversation we had with Radio 4 before Xmas, where a journalist had taken an interest in CCTV systems exposed on insecam.org.

    We had helped the journalist identify the homeowner with an exposed CCTV stream & they went to speak to them about it. Unsurprisingly, the homeowner had installed the system & left it exposed with default credentials. Whilst they could review their CCTV footage remotely on a mobile app, so could anyone else…

    It ended well though, as the homeowner took the system offline and secured it. One less exposed CCTV camera! The radio piece is here.

    As a reminder, if you don’t set a good, strong password for your CCTV system that you don’t use elsewhere, you run the risk of it being exposed and/or accessed remotely by nefarious parties.

  • Data & Society — Bounty Everything: Hackers and the Making of the Global Bug Marketplace

    In Bounty Everything: Hackers and the Making of the Global Bug Marketplace, researchers Ryan Ellis and Yuan Stevens provide a window into the working lives of hackers who participate in “bug bounty” programs—programs that hire hackers to discover and report bugs or other vulnerabilities in their systems. This report illuminates the risks and insecurities for hackers as gig workers, and how bounty programs rely on vulnerable workers to fix their vulnerable systems.
    Ellis and Stevens’s research offers a historical overview of bounty programs and an analysis of contemporary bug bounty platforms​​—the new intermediaries that now structure the vast majority of bounty work. The report draws directly from interviews with hackers, who recount that bounty programs seem willing to integrate a diverse workforce in their practices, but only on terms that deny them the job security and access enjoyed by core security workforces. These inequities go far beyond the difference experienced by temporary and permanent employees at companies such as Google and Apple, contend the authors. The global bug bounty workforce is doing piecework—they are paid for each bug, and the conditions under which a bug is paid vary greatly from one company to the next.
    Bounty Everything offers to reimagine how bounty programs can better serve the interests of both computer security and the workers that protect our digital world. Ellis & Stevens argue that if bounty programs are not designed and implemented properly, “this model can ironically perpetuate a world full of bugs that uses a global pool of insecure workers to prop up a business model centered on rapid iteration and perpetual beta.”

  • An Examination of the Bug Bounty Marketplace
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2021

    Every month we review the work funded by Freexian’s Debian LTS offering. Please find the report for December below.

  • Malware targeting Linux systems hit a new high in 2021 [Ed: Microsoft-connected Crowdstrike spreading lots of anti-Linux FUD at the moment to sell its proprietary products and to help Microsoft]
  • New year brings bad news for Linux as 2021 saw up to 10 times more malware samples
  • Linux malware is on the rise. Here are three top threats right now [Ed: Microsoft operatives inside the media use Microsoft-connected Crowdstrike to smear Linux right now; nobody bothers to check their Microsoft connections (words taken at face value)]

Once again, Microsoft-connected firm smears "Linux"

  • Why Linux Saw A Massive Rise In Malware Attacks Last Year

    Crowdstrike actually expects...

  • Linux malware rises

    The number of malware infections targeting Linux devices rose by 35 per cent in 2021, and it looks lie the writers want to recruit IoT devices for DDoS (distributed denial of service) attacks.

    According to a Crowdstrike report in 2021 XorDDoS, Mirai, and Mozi were the most prevalent families, accounting for 22 per cent of Linux-targeting malware attacks observed in 2021.

    Mozi saw an explosive growth in its activity, with ten times more samples circulating in the wild the year that passed compared to the previous one. XorDDoS use increased by123 per cent.

Slashdot is giving a megaphone to Microsofters against Linux

  • Linux Malware Sees 35% Growth During 2021

    The number of malware infections targeting Linux devices rose by 35% in 2021, most commonly to recruit IoT devices for DDoS (distributed denial of service) attacks

Microsofters

More FUD

Bruce Schneier has become megaphone of Microsoft proxy, FUD

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