Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Wine 7.0 Released with Support for New GPUs, Multiple Displays, and WoW64

Filed under
Linux
News
Gaming

After a year of development, Wine 7.0 is here to introduce lots of goodies to satisfy your Windows application and gaming needs. First of all, it brings support for the WoW64 (64-bit Windows-on-Windows) architecture to allow you to run 32-bit Windows programs inside a 64-bit Unix host process.

On top of that, Wine 7.0 adds support for multiple displays (multi-head) to its Direct3D implementation to allow you to choose which monitor a Direct3D program will use for full-screen mode, along with display gamma adjustment using the DXGI API, and support for new GPUs.

Read more

Original, LWN, and Larabel

  • WINE 7.0 released [LWN.net]

    Version 7.0 of the WINE Windows API library has been released.

  • WineHQ - News - Wine 7.0 Released

    The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 7.0 is now available.

    This release represents a year of development effort and over 9,100 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements that are listed in the release notes below.

  • Wine 7.0 Released With Improved Theming, New WoW64 & Much More - Phoronix

    Wine 7.0 is now officially available for enjoying Windows games and applications on Linux, macOS, and other platforms.

    Wine 7.0 serves as the annual stable release for "Wine Is Not an Emulator" for running Windows applications/games on other platforms. Wine 7.0 is the culmination of all the bi-weekly Wine 6.x(x) point releases over the past year.

Run Windows apps on Linux with Wine 7.0

  • Run Windows apps on Linux with Wine 7.0

    It used to be, people would scoff at the idea of switching to a Linux-based operating system due to a lack of software. While that is still true for some folks -- especially business users -- it is less of a concern these days. Why? Well, so many things are done through the web browser nowadays, lessening dependence on Windows software. For many consumers, just having the Google Chrome browser on, say, Ubuntu, is more than enough to accomplish their wants and needs. Not to mention, there are many quality Linux apps like GIMP and DaVinci Resolve.

    But OK, lets say you really want to use a Linux-based operating system, but there's some Windows-only software that you absolutely cannot live without. Thankfully, you may still be able to ditch Windows and upgrade to something like Fedora or Linux Mint. How? Thanks to the excellent Wine! This compatibility layer (don't you dare call it an emulator), can sometimes enable you to run Windows software on Linux. Today, version 7.0 is released.

Wine 7.0 Released with Tons of Improvements

  • Wine 7.0 Released with Tons of Improvements, Including a New Theme

    The new Wine 7.0 release features a year’s worth of development distilled from over 9,000 changes. The goal? To serve you a bold bouquet that’s rich in improvements, new features, and advanced capabilities.

    Now, the official release announcement is a little terse, but both the Wine mailing list announcement and the official release notes relay a lot more detail — like ‘best read with a glass of real wine and some nibbles’ detail.

Wine 7.0 is officially out now bringing better compatibility

  • Wine 7.0 is officially out now bringing better compatibility

    Just over a year since the last major version bump, Alexandre Julliard has announced the final release of Wine 7.0. This is the compatibility layer that allows you to run Windows applications and games on Linux, macOS and other systems.

    For those who have been running the biweekly development releases, the feature list of what has changed won't be new. As the main releases are just all the work in the development releases, plus a little extra time spent on bug fixing during the Release Candidate stage.

Wine 7.0 is a Massive Upgrade with Improved Windows App Support

  • Wine 7.0 is a Massive Upgrade with Improved Windows App Support, New Theme, and More Improvements

    Wine is the ultimate tool for Linux users relying on Windows-specific applications and games.

    With every release, we find better support for games and applications. And, anything that uses Wine as its backbone (like Lutris and others) benefits as well.

    And, it gets more exciting with Wine’s first release for 2022!

    Wine 7.0 stable release is here with massive upgrades! Here, I shall mention the key highlights and how to install it.

Wine 7.0 Released With New Features

  • Wine 7.0 Released With New Features | Itsubuntu.com

    Wine 7.0 is now available for download. It is the major release from the Wine developer. If you don’t know what Wine is then Wine is a software for Linux that lets Linux users run Windows-based applications in Linux.

Version 7 of WINE is better than ever at running Windows apps...

  • Version 7 of WINE is better than ever at running Windows apps where they shouldn't

    Version 7 of the WINE compatibility tool for running Windows programs on various *nix operating systems is here, bringing notably improved 64-bit support.

    WINE has come a long way. It took 18 years to get to version 1.0 and another nine years to get to version 2, but since version 3 in 2018, it's averaged roughly one major release per year. The project is now mature, stable, and quite functional. A lot of Windows programs work fine that formerly didn't. It's not limited to Linux – it also supports macOS and FreeBSD, and Linux relatives ChromeOS and Android.

    This may in part be due to its corporate backing. The project has had several business sponsors over the decades, including Corel, which invested substantial effort to help port WordPerfect Office, and later Google, which did the same so that the now-cancelled Picasa would work better on Linux.

    These days, its primary sponsor is Codeweavers, which sells a commercial version called CrossOver Office for Linux, macOS and ChromeOS, as well as tools and services to help with porting Windows apps.

Wine Stable 7.0 Released! How to Install in Ubuntu 20.04 / Linux

  • Wine Stable 7.0 Released! How to Install in Ubuntu 20.04 / Linux Mint 20

    After a year of development, Wine, the software for running Windows apps on Linux finally released new stable 7.0 version with over 9,100 individual changes.

    In Wine 7.0, most modules have been converted to PE format (Portable Executable, the Windows binary format) instead of ELF. This helps various copy protection schemes that check that the on-disk and in-memory contents of system modules are identical.

How to Install Wine 7.0 in Ubuntu

Install Wine 7.0 in Ubuntu 20.04 / 21.10 & Linux Mint

  • Install Wine 7.0 in Ubuntu 20.04 / 21.10 & Linux Mint

    This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to install wine 7.0 in Ubuntu 21.10, Ubuntu 20.04, and Linux Mint 20.3

    Wine team released its new STABLE version 7.0 on 18th JAN,2022 , after a year of development.

    This release has over 9100 changes and large number of improvements.

Wine 7.0 released with support for more GPUs, gaming

  • Wine 7.0 released with support for more GPUs, gaming with multiple displays, and more

    Wine is a free and open source tool that makes it possible to run many Windows apps and games on Linux and other operating systems including Android, macOS, and FreeBSD. And the latest version brings a number of significant new features and improvements.

    Updates in Wine 7.0 include improved support for theming, improved graphics, support for using multiple displays while playing games or running apps that make use of Direct3D, and thousands of other changes.

Wine 7.0 adds support for the best GPUs from AMD

  • Wine 7.0 adds support for the best GPUs from AMD and includes over 9,100 changes

    Wine 7.0 recently rolled out, and the update includes over 9,100 changes. Wine is a compatibility layer that allows people to run a large library of Windows apps and games on Linux. It's a popular way for gamers to enjoy the best PC games on non-Windows systems.

    [...]

    The update to Wine 7.0 adds support for some of the best GPUs to the Direct3D graphics card database. Among the newly supported graphics cards is the AMD Radeon RX 6800. Here's the complete list of the GPUs that were recently added to the Direct3D graphics card database:

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • How to Connect Wi-Fi using Nmcli in Linux

    Why use the Network-command-line Manager’s interface? Sometimes Ubuntu Network Manager behaves strangely, and you may be unable to connect to any Wi-Fi Hotspot using the GUI (Graphical user interface). The Network Manager may fail to start, and even after manually restarting the service through the terminal, you may still have difficulties connecting to any Wi-Fi Hotspot, even a previously recognized and stored home network. I encountered same problem on dual boot configurations and standalone Linux installs, and it was quite inconvenient, particularly during the WFH (Work from home) phase that we’re all going through.

  • How to Add Comments to UFW Rules

    In an earlier article we discussed how to add comments to iptables rules for clarity and documentation. In our opinion it is a good practice to comment anything someone else may have to work on in the future. Using comments in scripting is a common practice for good reason. We decided to write a quick tip on how to add a comment to UFW (Uncomplicated Firewall) rules. I am not a huge fan of UFW or Firewalld. In my opinion they make managing netfilter harder, not easier. That is because I started using iptables over 20 years ago. I am very comfortable with it and tend to know the necessary syntax off the top of my head. That being said, adding a comment to UFW rules is much more intuitive than any other iptables front end.

  • How to Install Drupal 9 on Ubuntu 22.04 - LinuxTuto

    Drupal is an open-source and popular content management tool that is the foundation of many websites across the internet. It has great standard features, like easy content authoring, reliable performance, and excellent security. Flexibility and modularity are some of the core principles that set it apart from the rest. In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Drupal 9 on your Ubuntu 22.04 OS.

  • How to migrate from Blogger to WordPress

    Blogger.com, as its name suggest is a blog service. Is very popular and it’s owned by google. You may want to take full control of your blog by setting up a WordPress on your server. But you still need your content: in this entry I’ll show you how to migrate from blogger to wordpress. I’m assuming you already have a brand new WordPress installation. If not, here on unixcop.com we have several articles about wordpress.

  • How to install Inkscape 1.2 on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Inkscape 1.2 on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • What is AWS CloudTrail and how to use it

The 10 Best Linux Apps for Musicians

If you're a musician of any kind, from beginner to professional, Linux provides an amazing assortment of free, yet powerful, platforms and applications that will boost your productivity and help you to show off your creativity. Don't let the fact that these apps are free wrongly influence your judgment. They are high-quality, professional-grade applications that rival even the most well-known, high-priced, commercial applications. These are 10 of the best Linux apps for musicians of all levels. Read more

GNOME and KDE: This Week in GNOME, Qt6 and KF6

  • #44 Five Across · This Week in GNOME

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from May 13 to May 20.

  • Okteta making a small step to Qt6 | Attracted by virtual constructs

    Old, but stable, even more in when it comes to the feature set, and still getting its polishing now and then: your simple editor for the raw data of files, named Okteta. What started in 2003 as a hex editing widget library for KDE3 (and Qt3), of course named KHexEdit (to be confused with the unrelated hex editor program that was part of KDE at that time), it turned into a first dedicated application by the title Okteta during the years 2006 to 2008 for KDE4 (and Qt4). From there on a small set of features was added once in a while, most impressively Alexander Richardson’s Structures tool in 2010,. Until then in 2013 the port to Qt5/KF5 was done (also to a good degree by Alexander). After that things had settled, the program working properly when needed, otherwise just left in the corner of the storage. Now, nearly 2 decades after the first lines were written, the next port is to be done, to Qt6 and KF6. And this time the actual port is just amazingly boring: changing a few “Qt5” to “Qt6” in the buildsystem (and later some “KF5” to “KF6” once KF6 is ready), adding Qt6::Core5Compat as helper library for 1-2 classes that had not yet been substituted, adding a “const” to the argument of an overridden virtual method, adapting some “QStringList” forward declarations… and done.

The 5 best Application Launchers for Ubuntu

Every operating system comes with an application launcher where you have to mouse over the entire menu to launch an application. But, unlike other operating systems, Linux allows us to install other launchers as an alternative. In this post, We came up with the five best application launchers for Ubuntu and their installation process. Ubuntu has a default application launcher, i.e., GNOME Shell application overview. If you are a beginner or a tech professional, browsing the entire menu to launch an application is quite bothersome. Linux community offers a wide variety of application launchers. From a rich UX-based to a bare minimum, Linux has everything to offer. These application launchers offer many themes and come with a lot of customization. Choosing the right application launcher as per your need might be difficult. That’s why we came up with the five best application launchers. Here are the top 5 application launchers for your Ubuntu. Read more