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MINISFORUM DeskMini UM350 mini PC now available with Manjaro Linux for $299 and up

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GNU
Linux

The developers of Manjaro Linux began partnering with PC makers earlier this year to offer mini PCs that come with the open source operating system pre-installed. So far we’ve seen Manjaro versions of the MINISFORUM UM700 and Beelink SER 4 4800U.

Now Manjaro and MINISFORUM have unveiled the most affordable option to date: the MINISFORUM DeskMini UM350 with Manjaro Linux is available for $299 and up.

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DeskMini UM350 with Manjaro Linux...

  • DeskMini UM350 with Manjaro Linux is MINISFORUM's most affordable mini PC yet at US$299

    As of late, MINISFORUM has been focusing on a few powerful mini PC builds that are not exactly affordable, but the budget models are still an important profitable part of the portfolio, so much so that the company is now releasing its most affordable mini PC yet in the form of the DeskMini UM350. This is MINISFORUM’s second Manjaro Linux system that is powered by AMD’s Ryzen 5 3550H processor with Vega 8 iGPU. Sure, the APU might be relatively old, but for a price tag as low as US$299, you can hardly find something faster these days.

    Now, the lowest price only gets you a system without RAM and just 256 GB of SSD storage preloaded with Manjaro Plasma Edition. However, you can add 8 GB of DDR4 RAM for only US$40 more, while the 16 GB RAM + 512 GB SSD version costs US$399. Users can also add their own 2.5-inch HDD. The case measures 5 x 5 x 2 inches and features ports like 1x USB-C 3.1 Gen 2, 3x USB-A 3.1 Gen 2. 1x USB-A 3.0, HDMI + DisplayPort video outputs, 2.5 GbE jack and an audio jack. Connectivity is ensured through a Wi-Fi 6 + BT 5.1 card.

DeskMini UM350 Manjaro Edition is a Linux mini PC powered

  • DeskMini UM350 Manjaro Edition is a Linux mini PC powered by an AMD Ryzen 5 3550H SoC

    Most mini PCs are offered with Windows 10 or 11 operating systems, but MinisForum DeskMini UM350 Manjaro Edition mini PC ships with Manjaro Linux, making it one of the rare mini PCs pre-loaded with a Linux distribution.

    The mini PC hardware is pretty standard with a 35W AMD Ryzen 5 3550H quad-core processor, support for up 64GB RAM, 2.5-inch SATA and M.2 2280 SSD storage, and the only real highlights are Linux support, and relatively affordable pricing.

Minisforum HX90G Mini-PC powered by AMD Ryzen 9 5900HX CPU and..

  • Minisforum HX90G Mini-PC powered by AMD Ryzen 9 5900HX CPU and discrete AMD GPU

    Minisforum has unveiled their latest Mini PC which is based on the AMD Ryzen 9 5900HX. The HX90G is also equipped with the Radeon RX 6650M discrete GPU design and dual SO-DIMM DDR4 slots for a total storage capacity of 64GB.

    The base clock for the Ryzen 9 5900HX is 3.3GHz and features eight cores and sixteen threads. Additionally, Minisforum has also mentioned they will release two additional configurations of the HX90G that will implement the AMD Ryzen 9 6900HX processor (w/ Radeon RX 6650M) and the Intel Core i9- 12900H (w/ AMD Discrete GPU).

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