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HP teamed up with System76 for the HP Dev One laptop with Pop!_OS Linux

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Hardware
Gaming

Pop!_OS Linux from System76 is expanding with more vendors, as HP now have a teaser up for the HP Dev One laptop. Built for developers they say, although with the kind of specs on offer it seems like it might make quite a good gaming machine too.

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Could System76 be an acquisition target?

  • HP chooses Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS Linux for its upcoming Dev One laptop -- could System76 be an acquisition target?

    Rumors have been swirling lately that HP was planning to release a laptop running the Pop!_OS operating system. Today, System76's CEO Carl Richell shared on Twitter that this is absolutely happening -- a 14-inch developer-focused notebook called "Dev One." While this is good news for the Linux community overall, it is quite curious. After all, System76 doesn't just maintain the Pop!_OS operating system, it sells computers running the distribution too. In other words, HP and System76 are competitors in the hardware business.

    So, what does this tell me? Well, it is purely speculation, but as the old adage says, "where there is smoke, there is fire." And so, it is safe to assume that HP acquiring System76 could be a possibility in the future -- if this new relationship pans out at least. HP could be testing the waters with the upcoming Dev One. Keep in mind, System76 does not even build its own laptops, so we could see the company leave the notebook business and focus on desktops only -- let HP handle the Pop!_OS laptops.

    "We've got you covered. Experience exceptional multi-core performance from the AMD Ryzen 7 PRO processor and multitask with ease. Compile code, run a build, and keep all your apps running with more speed from the 16GB memory. Plus, load and save files in a flash, thanks to 1TB fast PCIe NVMe M.2 storage. We've even added a Linux Super key so shortcuts are a click away. Simply put, HP Dev One is built to help you code better," explains HP.

Sign of the Times: The New HP Dev One Laptop Comes With Pop!_OS

  • Sign of the Times: The New HP Dev One Laptop Comes With Pop!_OS

    Just we were pointing out a few weeks back that Ubuntu is clearly losing ground as a gaming distro, we can now see it’s not just the gaming world that is affected: laptops made for developers may now be switching to something else too. HP has just revealed that its new HP Dev One laptop will ship with Pop!_OS, which is developed by System76.

HP Dev One laptop with Pop!_OS Linux coming soon for $1099

  • HP Dev One laptop with Pop!_OS Linux coming soon for $1099 - Liliputing

    Most HP computers ship with Windows, but from time to time the company has dabbled in Linux by offering models with Ubuntu or Red Hat Enterprise Linux. HP’s next Linux laptop is a little different.

    The upcoming HP Dev One is a 14 inch laptop with an AMD Ryzen processor that will ship with Pop!_OS pre-installed.

HP Team Up With System76 for New Linux Laptop

  • HP Team Up With System76 for New Linux Laptop

    HP is launching a Linux laptop pre-loaded with Pop!_OS, the Ubuntu-based distro created by System76.

    The collaboration, which was quietly revealed by System76 CEO Carl Richell on Twitter, is a pretty major one. It is the first time System76 has partnered with another computer company to ship their OS. It’s also the first time (to my knowledge) that a HP Linux laptop will ship with something other than vanilla Ubuntu.

    Specs for the 14-inch HP Dev One seem pretty sweet, too.

HP designing AMD-based Dev One laptop loaded with Linux

System76 Collaborates with HP for a Powerful Linux Laptop

  • System76 Collaborates with HP for a Powerful Linux Laptop for Developers

    System76 already makes Linux laptops. So, what is this all about?

    Well, this time, it will be a Linux laptop by HP, powered by Pop!_OS, i.e., the Ubuntu-based Linux distribution by System76.

    Carl Richell (System76’s Founder) made the announcement through his Twitter handle, with a link to the website that provides additional information on this.

HP’s Partnership with System76 Prepares New Linux-Based Laptop

  • HP’s Partnership with System76 Prepares New Linux-Based Laptop

    Almost all HP laptops are sold with Windows preinstalled; however, there are notable exceptions. We’re pleased to see a major computer manufacturer, HP, offer a Linux laptop.

    The yet-to-be-launched laptop will be a collaboration between HP and System76, a Denver-based American computer manufacturer.

    And, quite logically, the laptop will run Pop!_OS, an Ubuntu-based Linux desktop distro developed by System76. Pop!_OS uses GNOME as the desktop environment, and System76’s in-house made Pop!_OS COSMIC desktop.

System76 Teams up with HP to Create the Dev One Laptop

  • System76 Teams up with HP to Create the Dev One Laptop

    HP and System76 have come together to develop a new laptop, powered by Pop!_OS and aimed toward developers.

    The HP Dev One is a new laptop that is developer-focused and was created with the help of System76. This new laptop (which is yet to even go on pre-order), will start at $1099.00 and has a spec sheet that includes the likes of 16GB of DDR4 (@ 3200 MHz) RAM (upgradeable to 64GB), AMD Radeon graphics, a 1TB NVMe M.2 SSD, an AMD Ryzen 7 PRO CPU, and a 14" FHD anti-glare display. This is all powered by System76’s own Pop!_OS Linux distribution.

SJVN

  • HP and System76 partner to release high-end Linux laptop | ZDNet

    HP has long made Linux available on its laptops, but it was never a high priority for the Silicon Valley giant. For example, if you want a top-of-the-line HP ZBook Studio G8 Mobile Workstation with Ubuntu Linux 20.04 for not quite $4,000, you can get it… in mid-October. System76, a small Linux specialty OEM, can get you a high-quality Lemur Pro 14 without as many bells and whistles for $1,359 with Ubuntu 22.04 or System76's own take on Ubuntu, Pop!_OS 22.04, by early June.

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