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AlmaLinux 9 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9

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Red Hat

Powered by Linux 5.14 LTS kernel series and based on and fully compatible with the recently-released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9 operating system, AlmaLinux 9 is here as the first release of AlmaLinux that stems from CentOS Stream through RHEL.

AlmaLinux 9 introduces new functionality that makes it easier to automate and deploy at scale, networking enhancements for cloud and edge through the addition of more performance metrics in Web Cockpit, access to information to identify bottlenecks, the ability to apply kernel live patching inside Web Cockpit, and much more.

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Originals and more

  • AlmaLinux 9.0 Release Notes

    These are the release notes for AlmaLinux OS 9.0 for x86_64, aarch64, ppc64le and s390x architectures, codename Emerald Puma.

  • AlmaLinux 9 Now Available! - AlmaLinux OS Blog

    AlmaLinux OS 9.0 is based on upstream kernel version 5.14 and contains enhancements around cloud and container development and improvements to the web console (cockpit). This release also delivers enhancements for security and compliance, including additional security profiles, greatly improved SELinux performance and user authentication logs. Other various updates include Python 3.9, GCC 11 and the latest versions of LLVM, Rust and Go compilers to make modernizing the applications faster and easier. You can read more about it by checking out the Release Notes.

  • AlmaLinux 9 Is Now Available for Download, This Is What's New

    One week after RHEL 9, based on Kernel 5.14, AlmaLinux 9 (Emerald Puma) is the first release of AlmaLinux that stems from CentOS Stream through RHEL.

    AlmaLinux has emerged as a popular replacement for Red Hat Enterprise Linux’s free version since CentOS’s entry into the “stream.” AlmaLinux 9 (Emerald Puma) is the OS’s fifth stable release, proving the AlmaLinux Foundation’s commitment to delivering on its promises.

    The distro has millions of downloads from a network of over 200 mirrors worldwide and powers projects by US government agencies, the defense sector, CERN particle accelerators, business applications across a wide range of enterprises, and software development at GitLab and the web hosting industry.

ZDNet

  • CentOS Linux lives on in the new AlmaLinux 9 | ZDNet

    If you knew your way around Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) not so long ago, but you didn't want to pay Red Hat's support fees, you'd run CentOS Linux, an RHEL clone. Then Red Hat decided in 2020 that they'd no longer release CentOS Linux as a standalone distribution. Instead, CentOS Stream would work as a beta for RHEL.

New press release

  • AlmaLinux 9, Popular CentOS Alternative, Available Now | Business Wire

    AlmaLinux OS Foundation, the nonprofit that stewards the community owned and governed open source CentOS replacement AlmaLinux, today announced AlmaLinux 9, is now available for immediate download. The newest version of the popular CentOS alternative features functionality to make it easier to automate and deploy at scale, networking enhancements for cloud and edge and is more secure and faster by design via higher grade encryption and SELinux speed improvements. Based on Kernel 5.14, AlmaLinux 9 is the first release of AlmaLinux that stems from CentOS Stream through RHEL. AlmaLinux are proud contributors to CentOS Stream.

Ankush Das

  • AlmaLinux Continues the Legacy of CentOS with the Release of Version 9 - It's FOSS News

    If you have been keeping up with our coverages, you may have come across AlmaLinux 9.0 beta release last month.

    AlmaLinux is one of the best RHEL alternatives, so a new stable release based on the latest version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL 9) is useful as a CentOS replacement.

    The latest AlmaLinux 9 release supports the major architectures that include Intel/AMD(x86_64), ARM64 (aarch64), IBM PowerPC(ppc64le), and IBM Z (s390x).

AlmaLinux 9 Now Available

  • AlmaLinux 9 Now Available

    AlmaLinux 9, based on RHEL 9, has been released. Four architectures are supported, so ISO files are available for x86_64, Arm64, PowerPC, and IBM Z.

Press release scattered

How CentOS Stream and RHEL 9 Led to AlmaLinux 9

AlmaLinux 9 Released – Download DVD ISO Images

  • AlmaLinux 9 Released – Download DVD ISO Images

    Ever since AlmaLinux made its footprints known to the Linux community as one of the viable replacements/alternatives to the now-discontinued CentOS, this Linux operating system distribution has earned its stripes as a reliable, stable, free, and open-source operating system.

AlmaLinux 9, a RedHat Linux with KDE and Xfce desktops

  • AlmaLinux 9, a RedHat Linux with KDE and Xfce desktops

    AlmaLinux 9 is another major release to cater to the users who are missing the Long term support in CentOS. This is the new major version derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) but with some bold steps to make it more popular among Desktop & Workstation users.

    AlmaLinux 9 arrives following the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 9, almost attached to it in time with all its new features at the system level.

    As per the release note, AlmaLinux 9 borrows all RHEL 9 updates, including performance optimizations and security improvements, applied, as well as new versions of components such as programming languages, frameworks, and other tools, focused on development. In this regard, AlmaLinux 9 adds new repositories for SAP and SAPHANA.

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