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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • What happened to simple, basic web hosting?

    For a friend’s memorial I signed up to make a batch of images into a slideshow. All I wanted was the Simplest Possible Thing: a web page that would cycle through a batch of images. It’s been a while since I did something like this, so I looked around and didn’t find anything that seemed simple enough. The recipes I found felt like overkill. Here’s all I wanted to do:

    1. Put the images we’re gathering into a local folder

    2. Run one command to build slideshow.html

    3. Push the images plus slideshow.html to a web folder

  • Just Copy What Works

    No magic. No plan. No philosophy. Just copying what demonstrably works for someone I know directly.

  • Web URL paths don't quite map cleanly onto the abstract 'filesystem API'

    Generally, the path portion of web URLs maps more or less on to the idea of a hierarchical filesystem, partly because the early web was designed with that in mind. However, in thinking about this I've realized that there is one place where paths are actually a superset of the broad filesystem API; in fact this place actually causes some amount of heartburn and different design decisions in web servers when they serve static files.

    The area of divergence is that in the general filesystem API, directories don't have contents, just children. Only files have contents. In web paths, of course, directories very frequently have contents as well as children (if anything, a web path directory that refuses to have contents is rarer than one that does). This is quite convenient for people using the web, but requires web servers to invent a convention for how path directories get their contents (for example, the 'index.html' convention).

  • Wireshark’s little known Snort post-dissector

    Snort rules are considered the gold standard of network intrusion detection signatures, and because of that, new analysts need to learn how to read and understand their logic. There are many great blog posts already on understanding Snort rules, such as this one by Rapid7, so I won’t try to rehash them here.

    Instead, I wanted to show how you can use Wireshark to find which specific packet triggered a Snort rule in seconds from within the Wireshark GUI, giving you all the surrounding context that a PCAP can give you.

  • How to use Keycloak to configure SSO and MFA for command-line applications | Enable Sysadmin

    Set up identity and access management for command-line interface (CLI) applications with the Keycloak open source tool.

  • How To Install Visual Studio Code on AlmaLinux 9 [Ed: Very bad idea as it is proprietary, it is controlled by Microsoft, it spies on the users, and these instructions give Microsoft complete (root) control over your GNU/Linux PC]

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • Top 12 Things to Do After Installing Linux Mint 21 (Vanessa)

    Linux Mint is one of the highly rated Linux distribution for desktops. Recently Linux Mint 21, code name Vanessa has been released. We have already covered an article which shows Linux mint 21 Installation steps. In this article, we will learn what are the Top 12 things to do after installing Linux Mint 21.

  • Creating a NixOS live USB for a full featured APU router

    At home, I'm running my own router to manage Internet, run DHCP, do filter and caching etc... I'm using an APU2 running OpenBSD, it works great so far, but I was curious to know if I could manage to run NixOS on it without having to deal with serial console and installation.

  • Internxt – Web3 Ready Privacy-centric Cloud Storage with Linux client

    Cloud storage has grown in importance in our daily digital lives. Almost all of us utilise some form of cloud storage service to ensure that our crucial information are kept forever. While cloud storage allows us to keep our data and retrieve them whenever and wherever we want, not all of them are as private and safe as Internxt.

  • How To Enable Dark Mode on Chromebook
  • Link: The MGR Window System

    The MGR Window System (via) is a brief introduction to MGR, an interesting and under-mentioned Unix windowing system, including a screenshot. I once used MGR myself and have reasonably fond memories of it, so it's nice to see more writing about it on the Internet.

Programming Leftovers

  • BaCon dependency removed from OE

    Many years ago, I was keen on BaCon. It converts traditional BASIC language to C and then calls gcc to create an executable. The problem I have is that it is cross-compiler-unfriendly. Host x86_64 and target x86_64, compiled in OE, it would generated executables, but some simply didn't work. Host x86_64, target i686, compiling in OE is broken. I have previously rewritten some in C, however, there still remained picscale', 'popup', 'pup_event_ipc', 'find_cat' and 'debdb2pupdb'.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RApiSerialize 0.1.1 on CRAN: Updates

    A new release 0.1.1 of RApiSerialize is now on CRAN. While this is the first release in seven years (!!), it brings mostly minor internal updates along with the option of using serialization format 3. The package is used by both my RcppRedis as well as by Travers excellent qs package. Neither one of us has a need to switch to format 3 yet so format 2 remains the default. But along with other standard updates to package internals, it was straightforward to offer the newer format so that is what we did.

  • coarse or lazy? -- wingolog

    One of the things that had perplexed me about the Immix collector was how to effectively defragment the heap via evacuation while keeping just 2-3% of space as free blocks for an evacuation reserve. [...] To Immix, a "recyclable" block is partially full: it contains surviving data from a previous collection, but also some holes in which to allocate. But when would you have recyclable blocks at evacuation-time? Evacuation occurs as part of collection. Collection usually occurs when there's no more memory in which to allocate. At that point any recyclable block would have been allocated into already, and won't become recyclable again until the next trace of the heap identifies the block's surviving data. Of course after the next trace they could become "empty", if no object survives, or "full", if all lines have survivor objects.

  • Type-On Typewriter Animation in Nuke

    Users of AfterEffects are used to a plethora of presets for text animation. Unfortunately, text animation in Nuke is significantly limited in that the contents of the text field cannot be easily animated. I was working on producing a music video in which type-on text shows the lyrics in time with the music and ran into the limitation. I was not willing to mask letters individually using roto tools and instead decided to write a small python program that generates the animation in side of Nuke.

  • Multiple Inline SVGs (From QuickChart)

    I’m working on generating some stats and accompanying graphs for my blog (blog post to come on this…). For the charts, I’m using the quickchart.io API (a tool I’ve used before) and it’s beautifully simple: pass data as a URL, get back a chart. It’s working. My build hits the quickchart API, gets an SVG, and inlines it into my HTML. It looks great!

Games: Porting Doom, ScummVM, and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Debian Hiding Issues and Suppressing Volunteers' Dissent

  • Debian Suicide FYI: Lucas Nussbaum & Debian attempted exploit of OVH Hosting insider

    When Debian cabalists wanted to steal the domain debian-multimedia.org in 2014, they didn't go to a lawyer or the World Intellectual Property Organization. The Debian Project Leader (DPL), Lucas Nussbaum, who is a professor at Université de Lorraine, France, relied on another Debian Developer to tap the shoulder of an insider at OVH, which is also a French company, to see if the domain registration could be hijacked covertly. According to the email below, OVH managers didn't want to get involved in Debian dirty politics.

  • Ownership of debian.community domain [Ed: This statement was issued on a Sunday; they've solved none of the underlying issues, they're just gagging those who speak about Debian issues]

    The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), under its Uniform Domain-Name Dispute-Resolution Policy (UDRP), decided that ownership of the debian.community domain should be transferred to the Debian Project. The appointed panel found that the disputed domain name is identical to a trademark in which the Complainant has rights.