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GNU/Linux Monthly Screenshots


July 2017 Setup


June 2014 Kubuntu Screenshot


March-April 2014 Kubuntu Screenshot


February 2014 Kubuntu Screenshot


January - February 2014 Kubuntu Screenshot

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Susan has gathered far more diverse screenshots over the years, as shown below.


2011-2013 Linux Screenshots
2010 Linux Screenshots
2009 Linux Screenshots
2008 Gentoo Screenshots
2007 Gentoo Screenshots
2006 Gentoo Screenshots
2005 Gentoo Screenshots
2004 Gentoo Screenshots



Blast from the Past!


More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop/GTK: GNOME Shell 3.33.3, GStreamer Rust Bindings 0.14.0 and Sysprof

  • GNOME Shell 3.33.3

    GNOME Shell provides core user interface functions for the GNOME 3 desktop, like switching to windows and launching applications. GNOME Shell takes advantage of the capabilities of modern graphics hardware and introduces innovative user interface concepts to provide a visually attractive and easy to use experience.

  • GNOME Shell & Mutter See Their 3.33.3 Releases With Notable X11/Wayland Changes

    Arriving late, a few days after the GNOME 3.33.3 development snapshot, the Mutter and GNOME Shell updates are now available. The Mutter 3.33.3 window manager / compositor update is notable with preparations for running XWayland on-demand -- a.k.a. just when needed for X11 client usage and not constantly. The Mutter update also now honors the startup sequence workspace on Wayland, fixes around fractional scaling, adds the new Sysprof-based profiling support, adds mouse and locate-pointer accessibility, consolidates the frame throttling code, improves screencasting support on multi-monitor systems, fixes running X11 applications with sudo under Wayland, adds initial KMS transactional support, and there are many bug fixes.

  • GStreamer Rust bindings 0.14.0 release

    Apart from updating to GStreamer 1.16, this release is mostly focussed on adding more bindings for various APIs and general API cleanup and bugfixes. The most notable API additions in this release are bindings for gst::Memory and gst::Allocator as well as bindings for gst_base::BaseParse and gst_video::VideoDecoder and VideoEncoder. The latter also come with support for implementing subclasses and the gst-plugins-rs module contains an video decoder and parser (for CDG), and a video encoder (for AV1) based on this.

  • Sysprof design work

    Since my last post, I’ve been working on a redesign of Sysprof (among other things) to make it a bit more useful and friendly to newcomers. Many years ago, I worked on a small profiler project called “Perfkit” that never really went anywhere. I had already done most of my UI research for this years ago, so it was pretty much just a matter of applying that design to the Sysprof code-base.

Intel UMWAIT Support Queued For Linux 5.3 - New Feature For Tremont Cores

Adding to the growing list of features for the upcoming Linux 5.3 kernel is now Intel UMWAIT support for better power-savings. UMWAIT is a new feature for Intel Tremont CPUs cores. UMWAIT can help enhance power savings during idle periods with "user mode wait" functionality. UMWAIT allows for monitoring a range of addresses in a lightweight power/performance state or an enhanced mode that can still help with conserving power but less so in order to offer lower latencies. UMWAIT is intended to be used as an alternative to kernel spinloops when needing to wait/sleep for short periods of time when the system is idle. Read more

today's howtos

Five Linux Server Administration Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

In 2017, an employee at GitLab, the version control hosting platform, was asked to replicate a database of production data. Because of a configuration error, the replication did not work as expected, so the employee decided to remove the data that had been transferred and try again. He ran a command to delete the unwanted data, only to realize with mounting horror that he had entered the command into an SSH session connected to a production server, deleting hundreds of gigabytes of user data. Every seasoned system administrator can tell you a similar story. The Linux command line gives server admins control of their servers and the data stored on them, but it does little to stop them running destructive commands with consequences that can’t be undone. Accidental data deletion is just one type of mistake that new server administrators make. Read more