Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Quakecon 2005 id Software Keynote Coverage: Carmack Talks

Filed under
Gaming

It is another hot August in Texas, and that means Quakecon. The highlight is always the id presentation topped off with programmer and rocketeer extraordinaire John Carmack's chat with the audience. We will find out more about Quake 4 including viewing the E3 trailer. We will find out about what Carmack thinks of the hype surrounding the next generation consoles. John will also reveal how he feels about current CPU and GPU technology. The benefits and challenges of multithreading will be covered as well his thoughts on dedicated physics cards. Also don't forget about the latest on Armadillo Aerospace, what car John is driving, and why he thinks cell phone gaming in the next year or so could be where we find our next new gaming genre from. Hold on as we dig in deep to another information packed id Quakecon presentation and the first live John Carmack game tech talk and Q and A session since 2002.

We begin our coverage on the subject of Quake 4 which finally at E3 saw the light of day, and at Quakecon is available for play on systems in the Activision booth. This highly anticipated title blends the multiplayer experience of Quake 3 with the single player campaign similar to that of Quake 2. Developer Raven has been put at the realm of the project that has been in the works for some time. The Quake 4 demo was run live as it was at E3 and the reaction was positive throughout. They were on hand with the id staffers to answer a few questions the audience submitted on cards before John took over.

Raven stressed that the multiplayer and single player experience were both getting significant resources put behind them. Quake 4 will not be lopsided in that respect. A large focus will be put on mod tools that will ship with game out of the box. They want to make modding the game be very easy which of course had been a trend for some time. The only significant mod of late has been the Quake 2 mod of Doom 3, and no multiplayer OSP style competition mod came to fruition.

Touching on the system specifications they revealed that if you system can play Doom 3 you will be fine with Quake 4 as was expected. The system playing it was a 3.4GHz P4 Falcon Northwest box with a 6800 running at 1280X1024. The Doom 3 engine was enhanced by Raven with improved physics and of course included support for vehicles which is something we also saw at E3 with Prey. Raven's ultimate goal with game was to keep it fun with unique experiences and no dull moments.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

"You Don't Own What You Buy" and Openwashed Microsoft Entrapment

  • You Don't Own What You Buy: The Tetris Edition

    In the convoluted realm that has become copyright, licensing agreements, and SaaS-style everything, we've had something of a running series of posts that focus on the bewildering concept that we no longer own what we buy. Between movies simply being disappeared, features on gaming consoles being obliterated via firmware update, and entire eBook platforms simply ceasing to work, the benefits of handing over very real dollars have never been more fleeting.

  • The Surface Duo SDK is now available for macOS and Linux
  • Microsoft releases open source source code analyzer

    Looking to aid developers who rely on external software components, Microsoft has introduced a source code analyzer, Microsoft Application Inspector, to help surface features and other characteristics of source code.  Downloadable from GitHub, the cross-platform command-line tool is designed for scanning components prior to use to assist in determining what the software is or what it does. The data it provides can be useful in reducing the time needed to determine what software components do by examining the source code directly rather than relying on documentation. 

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 RC is out

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 is just around the corner. The team is publishing today the last milestone for current release cycle. OMLx 4.1 RC release is mostly bug fixing and update packages. Read more

Proprietary Software and Security Leftovers

  • FilelistCreator is a directory printer for Windows, macOS and Linux

    Many people organize their data into folders to quickly find what they want. The Windows operating system comes with default folders for images, videos, and downloads for example that many users of Windows use. Windows does not really provide good easily accessible options to compare the contents of two folders; this is especially the case if root folders contain hundreds of even thousands of files and folders.

  • Ragnarok Ransomware Targets Citrix ADC, Disables Windows Defender

    A new ransomware called Ragnarok has been detected being used in targeted attacks against unpatched Citrix ADC servers vulnerable to the CVE-2019-19781 exploit. Last week, FireEye released a report about new attacks exploiting the now patched Citrix ADC vulnerability to install the new Ragnarok Ransomware on vulnerable networks. When attackers can compromise a Citrix ADC device, various scripts would be downloaded and executed that scan for Windows computers vulnerable to the EternalBlue vulnerability. If detected, the scripts would attempt to exploit the Windows devices, and if successful, inject a DLL that downloads and installs the Ragnarok ransomware onto the exploited device.

  • The Risks and Potential Impacts Associated with Open Source [Ed: DevOps site gives a platform to Black Duck -- a Microsoft-connected FUD arm against FOSS]
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (iperf3, openjpeg2, and tomcat7), Mageia (ansible, c3p0, fontforge, glpi, gthumb, libbsd, libmediainfo, libmp4v2, libqb, libsass, mbedtls, opencontainers-runc, php, python-pip, python-reportlab, python3, samba, sysstat, tomcat, virtualbox, and webkit2), openSUSE (java-11-openjdk, libredwg, and sarg), Oracle (sqlite), Red Hat (libarchive, nss, and openjpeg2), Scientific Linux (sqlite), SUSE (nodejs6), and Ubuntu (cyrus-sasl2, linux, linux-aws, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-aws, linux-oem, mysql-5.7, mysql-8.0, tcpdump, and tomcat8).

  • Hacker Releases 500,000 IoT Credentials

    One of the biggest issues that IoT has is keeping everything secure. Putting devices online is a double-edged sword: it allows benevolent useful services to connect to it, but it can also allow malicious agents to harvest data from it. This was proven a few days ago when a list of 500,000 IoT credentials made their way onto the Internet. The list was posted on a hacker forum for anyone to see and use.

  • Apple is attending a meeting in Washington on Monday as a Board Member of the CARIN Alliance on Health Record Sharing

    The CARIN Alliance is meeting with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on Monday, January 27, 2020 at 3:00 pm ET in Washington, D.C., and representatives from Apple and Microsoft will be attending via phone. Apple is an official CARIN Alliance Board Member and what transpires on Monday could affect Apple's work positively regarding their Health Record-Sharing Platform beyond their current work with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  • Big tech CEOs are learning the art of the filibuster

    But it’s clear that as prevailing sentiment about big tech companies has darkened, tech CEOs see increasingly little value in having meaningful public conversations. Instead, they grit their teeth through every question, treating every encounter as something in between a legal deposition and a hostage negotiation.

    We saw this in 2018, when the New Yorker profiled Mark Zuckerberg. We saw it again last year, when Jack Dorsey went on a podcast tour. At some point this year Tim Cook will probably give a zero-calorie interview to someone, and if it’s a slow-enough news day I’ll write this column for a fourth time.

Red Hat vs. SUSE vs. Canonical Contributions To The Mainline Linux Kernel Over The 2010s

After last week looking at the AMD/Intel/NVIDIA contributions to the mainline Linux kernel over the past number of years, there were reader requests for seeing how some of the top distributions compare namely Red Hat, SUSE, and Canonical. These graphs today are looking at the contributions by SUSE, Red Hat, and Canonical to the mainline Linux kernel. Keep in mind this is the Git commits made from using the respective corporate domains for each organization. Read more