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10 Things Songbird Does That iTunes Can’t

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Software

Songbird turned 1.0 this week, and aims to do to iTunes what Firefox did to Internet Explorer. That is, it aims to take the basic design of something closed and proprietary, and turn it into something open and extensible and fun. Songbird aims to give the power back to the people.

Appearing in February 2006, Songbird is five years younger than Apple’s iTunes, and does not yet match it feature for feature. iPod support, album artwork, podcast support and stability are considered beta features and need improving. CD ripping, watching folders for changes and video support are all still coming.

However, Songbird’s unique features make it a great media player in the Web 2.0 world. It is a flexible tool that belongs in the toolkit of any musician who explores new music online. In particular, the way it works with music-related websites and blogs greatly interests me. Songbird has completely changed the way I think about discovering and playing music online.

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Programming Leftovers

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The 20 Best Mate Themes for Linux System in 2020

Linux is the most popular open-source UNIX like an operating system. It is well known because of its lightweight. Unlike other OS, it can be used in a wide range of hardware devices that include PCs, laptops, netbooks, mobile, tablet, video game consoles, servers, and even in supercomputers. Mate is a desktop environment that comes with extensive features, while all the primary metaphors of Linux distribution remain the same. It comes with a lot of Linux compatible applications and can be considered as the continuation of the GENOME 2 project. It has already replaced the traditional GNOME shell. There are several powerful mate themes available out there that can help you to make your Mate desktop more clean, modern, and eye-catching as well. Read more

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