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Review: Win4Lin Pro

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The number of useful desktop applications for Linux is growing every day, but there are many would-be users who still have one or more "must have" Windows applications. For those users, running Windows under Linux is a suitable alternative to having to maintain two systems, or a dual-boot system with Linux and Windows. One of the options for running Windows under Linux is Win4Lin, Inc.'s Win4Lin Pro, which was released earlier this year. Win4Lin Pro gets the job done, but its performance and usability are a bit disappointing.

I took Win4Lin Pro 2.0 for a test drive, to see whether it was a suitable choice for users who want to run Windows applications under Linux. Note that Win4Lin Pro is only for Windows 2000 and Windows XP; if you want to run Windows 98 or older versions of Windows, you can use the company's Win4Lin 9x, which has been available for several years. If you want to run other x86 operating systems, VMware, Xen, or Qemu might be what you're looking for.

Full Article.

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