Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Google, Skype in Startup to Link Hotspots

Filed under
Google

Google Inc. and eBay Inc.'s Skype are investing in a startup that plans to help hotspot owners charge for Wi-Fi access, a plan that could face significant opposition from Internet service providers.

The Internet heavyweights were joined by venture capital firms Index Ventures and Sequoia Capital in making a $22 million investment in FON, the Spanish startup. In its announcement Sunday, FON did not say how much each investor was contributing.

FON's idea, floated just three months ago in a Web posting by founder Martin Varsavsky, is to sign up people who have Wi-Fi hotspots in one of two ways.

"Linus" members, named after Linus Torvalds, who created the freely distributed Linux software, will share their hotspot with other Linus members for free.

"Bill" members, named after Microsoft Corp. founder Bill Gates, will charge for access to their hotspot. FON will get some of that revenue, and share it with Internet service providers, or ISPs.

The network has gained 3,000 Linus members since going live in November. There is no software yet for Bill members, but Varsavsky expects it to be ready within four months. Linus software is so far only available for Wi-Fi routers from Linksys, a division of Cisco Systems Inc.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Native Linux & Raspberry Pi support for checkra1n jailbreak hinted by developer

Despite hitting the market first, iPhone comes behind Android in terms of popularity. We admit the price plays a significant role here. But, a Samsung or Huawei flagship user who can afford an iPhone will tell you the level of customisation or convenience is what brought them to Android. Let’s set the convenience part aside because it is not really an issue after we get accustomed to the whole ecosystem of a device. However when it comes to the customisation, we can’t deny Android from bagging the pole position. Read more

today's howtos

Linux Kernel Security in a Nutshell: How to Secure Your Linux System

The Linux kernel is the core component of the Linux operating system, maintaining complete control over everything in the system. It is the interface between applications and data processing at the hardware level, connecting the system hardware to the application software. The kernel manages input/output requests from software, memory, processes, peripherals and security, among other hefty responsibilities. Needless to say, the Linux kernel is pretty important. However, with power comes great responsibility, and the Linux kernel is no exception to this rule. Kernel security is critical: it determines the security of the Linux operating system as a whole, as well as the security of every individual system that runs on Linux. Vulnerabilities in the kernel can have serious implications for Linux users, and it is extremely important that users stay up-to-date on news and advisories pertaining to kernel security. Read more