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First Look: Free SeaMonkey Internet Tool Suite Is Solid

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Moz/FF

My hat is off to anyone who goes against the trend. Just when browsers and other Internet tools focus on getting small and specialized, along comes the SeaMonkey Internet Suite that harkens back to the Net's early days by building atop the vestiges of the old Netscape suite of Web tools.

The Mozilla Foundation's announcement in 2003 that it would focus on the Firefox browser and Thunderbird e-mail client seemed to signal the end of the Mozilla Application Suite. After all, the trend has long been toward modular Internet tools and away from a browser integrated with e-mail, chat, and other Web tools.

Defying convention, a group of volunteer developers has revived the former Mozilla suite to create SeaMonkey, a free program that combines the Mozilla Navigator browser with an enhanced version of the Netscape Messenger e-mail client, the ChatZilla IRC (Internet Relay Chat) program, and an HTML editor and other tools for Web developers.

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