Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mandriva Desktop 2011 teaser

Filed under
Linux

Getting closer to the release of Mandriva Desktop 2011. The first release candidate was made available June 30, 2011. I do not like to review pre-stable releases, so this is not going to be a review, but a teaser, a taste of what is to come.

From what I have seen, I can tell you that Mandriva Desktop 2011 will be one of the best, if not the best, Linux distribution in this release cycle. The most exciting desktop yet. Read this article and get a preview of what Mandriva is cooking up.

Read the complete article at http://linuxbsdos.com/ask/2011/07/mandriva-desktop-2011/

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

It's gonna be huge!

Menu, Y U so big?

More in Tux Machines

Gamechuck sponsors Krita

Gamechuck, a new studio based in Zagreb, has just released the first trailer for their upcoming role-playing adventure game Trip the Ark Fantastic. Trip the Ark Fantastic is planned for release in 2022 on PC/Mac/Linux and consoles, and Gamechuck has created the game entirely with free software. What’s more, they have also decided to sponsor Krita’s development! Trip the Ark Fantastic is a story-driven roleplaying adventure set in the Animal Kingdom on the verge of both industrial and social revolution. The story follows Charles, a hedgehog scholar on a mission by the lion king to save the monarchy, but his decisions could end up helping reformists or even to bring about anarchy. Read more Also: Interview with teteotolis

Audiocasts/Shows: GNU World Order, Linux Action News and Librem 5 USA

  • GNU World Order 13x50

    Listener feedback.

  • Linux Action News 135

    Ubuntu Pro is a click away, and their kernel goes rolling on AWS. We process the range of announcements, while Mozilla cranks up the security and impresses us with DeepSpeech. Plus why Ubuntu is taking the Windows Subsystem for Linux so seriously.

  • The $2000 Dollar Linux Phone | Librem 5 USA

    Well isn't this interesting... a $2000 dollar Linux phone. Yeah, that is three zeros and I must say this phone... is different

Matroska (MKV) Creation Software Suite MKVToolNix Sees New 41.0.0 Release

MKVToolNix, a free and open source set of tools for creating, editing and inspecting Matroska (MKV, MK3D, MKA, and MKS) files, has seen a new release which brings support for reading Opus audio and VP9 video from MP4 files for mkvmerge, improvements for predefined track names, and more. MKVToolNix is made of 4 command line tools: mkvmerge (create Matroska files from other media files), mkvinfo (show Matroska file information), mkvextract (extracts tracks / data from Matroska files), and mkvpropedit (change the properties of existing Matroska files without a complete remux), as well as MKVToolNix GUI (a Qt GUI for mkvmerge, mkvinfo and mkvpropedit). The tools are available on Linux, *BSD, Windows and macOS. With the latest MKVToolNix 41.0.0, Vorbis, Opus and VP8 stream comments (Vorbis comments) are converted to Matroska attachments for cover art, and Matroska track tags for other comments. This has been implemented for both the Matroska and Ogg readers. Read more

The Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Pre-release Survey

In what is becoming an incredibly insightful tradition, we have built a 5 to 10-minute survey to collect direct feedback from as many operating system users as we can. Not just those on Ubuntu desktop but also those using Ubuntu server and Ubuntu in the cloud. Before our last LTS release, we sent out a call to action for developers to tell us how can we make Ubuntu better. Today, we would like to ask our broader community for similar feedback. With our next LTS release on the horizon, there is still time to influence the final picture and Ubuntu’s future roadmap. And not just for 20.04, but beyond. The results here will be used to inform decisions for several releases to come. But like all new things, its success ultimately depends on the user. You. Throughout the development process, our teams are in the various forums and threads, listening to your feedback to help inform our decision making. Our engineers themselves are incredibly passionate about Linux, and the Ubuntu community in general, and our decision-making process will always revolve around this fact. But in the run-up to something big like an LTS release, is it possible we find ourselves lost in an Ubuntu bubble? Are there developments in open source or trends on a level that we’re just not seeing? And if so, what are they? Read more