Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 18 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Diamonds are a girl's best friend srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:45pm
Story AMD not out of the Race yet srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:53pm
Story techiemoe rants: srlinuxx 10/08/2009 - 7:01pm
Story More BS from the Evil One. srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:27pm
Story Doom3 for those with little or no PC! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 12:49am
Story Linux leaders at open-source summit srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:35pm
Story This months Cosmo srlinuxx 06/02/2005 - 4:03am
Story Mandrake's Clustering Again srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:58pm
Story No Case - No Problem srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 5:35am
Story ATI has released 64-Bit drivers srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:38pm

today''s leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver Continues Speeding Ahead For Open-Source Mali Graphics

    Panfrost only made its initial debut as part of the recent Mesa 19.1 release for providing open-source Arm Mali Bifrost/Midgard graphics driver support on Linux independent of Arm and their official binary driver. While the resources are limited, so far Panfrost is making stellar progress. 

    Panfrost continues making terrific progress for providing open-source Arm Mali graphics support. In part, this is made by possible by lead developer Alyssa Rosenzweig currently interning for the summer at Collabora where she appears to be primarily working on this currently OpenGL ES 2.0 class driver and continuing to strive for competitive performance with Arm's official Linux GLES driver.

  • The big Civilization VI "June 2019 Update" for Gathering Storm is now live

    Firaxis Games, Aspyr Media and 2K today put out a rather large update to Civilization VI, the June 2019 for Gathering Storm adds in some new features and comes with plenty of balance changes and bug fixes.

  • Free and open source software is being sold commercially in the Microsoft Store

    Ever since Microsoft, one of the original and squarely proprietary tech giants, pivoted from software to services some years back, its relationship with free and open source software seems to have improved.

    For one thing, Microsoft replies on such things as open source flagship Linux for its cloud infrastructure. And the company also made a series of moves indicating it was now a better, gentler version of its old self, seeking not only to use open source software but also contribute back to it.

  • The Best Free Photoshop Alternatives

    GIMP, or GNU Image Manipulation Program, is more than just a photo editor. It also has sophisticated image manipulation tools, which will appeal to pros as well as regular uers.  

    GIMP has the expected assortment of basic features, including cropping and straightening to adjusting brightness, contrast, and color balance to name a few. Plus it has more advanced tools, like layers, content rescaling, and animation, plus the ability to add blur, noise, and distortion, among other effects.

    In fact GIMP offers most of the features that Photoshop has, even if it is missing things like other color modes besides RGB and the capability for non-destructive editing. Even better, GIMP’s interface is very customizable, and its features are expandable. Since it is open source, GIMP community members can create plugins, and they often do, sharing them to the rest of the community for free.

  • Nvidia and ARM join forces to eighty-six x86 supercomputers

    Team Green, which has a thing for making lunchbox-sized supercomputers, will be making its CUDA-X AI and high-performance computing (HPC) software work nicely with the ARM ecosystem, which means a load of processors based on CPUs and architectures coming out of the Cambridge chip designer.

  • When the Atari ST Was the Future of Computing

    The Atari 520ST was Atari's first 16-bit salvo in the personal computer wars of the 1980s. A

  • New vulnerabilities may let hackers remotely SACK Linux and FreeBSD systems
  • Linux Kernel Bug Knocks PCs, IoT Gadgets and More Offline
  • Oregon prisons ban dozens of technology and programming books over security concerns

    “There’s absolutely nothing in there that would pose a security risk. The books are written for consumers - people at home,” he said. “There’s very little about there in networking and there’s certainly nothing about breaking into networks.”

    Prison officials said the bans aren’t arbitrary or a blanket prohibition on technology-focused books. Instead, they’re a reflection of the resources available to inmates.

    “We allow our folks in custody to have a lot of access to computers,” said Kelly Raths, the department’s central mailroom administrator.

    Inmates in Oregon facilities can have USB drives, allowing them to store college papers or legal pleadings and transport them between computers, Raths said. Classrooms inside prisons have networked computers.

  • Slimbook Launches New "Apollo" Linux PC, First Beta for Service Pack 5 of SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Is Out, NVIDIA Binary Drivers for Ubuntu Growing Stale, DragonFly BSD v 5.6 Released and Qt v. 5.12.4 Now Available

    Slimbook, the Spanish Linux computer company, just unveiled a brand-new all-in-one Linux PC called the "Apollo". It has a 23.6 inch IPS LED display with a 1920x1080 resolution, and a choice between an Intel i5-8500 and i7-8700 processors. It comes with up to 32GB of RAM and integrated Intel UHD 630 4K graphics. Pricing starts at $799.

Linux Distributions for IoT: A Guide to Making the Right Choice

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Linux distributions may be popular for IoT initiatives, but making the wrong choice can have dire consequences.

Read more

Also: Kontron unveils Whiskey Lake-UE module and updates Coffee Lake COM to 9th Gen chips

Programming/Development: C++, Go, Mozilla/Firefox and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Deliverable 1 : [✓]

    Seems okay, far better than the initial results. Although I should say, I deviated from what I thought I would need to write. First I assumed that I don’t have to write another boost::graph wrapper for KisPaintDevice, but I had to. That was one heck of an experience. In one of the last few posts, I ranted on Dmitry’s interpretation of the Graph, turns out we were on the same page but I understood his explanation the wrong way. I should put more attention to details from now on I guess.

    All the pixels are connected to each other, but they only have an edge between them if they are adjacent. If in center, the out degree would be 8, if in corners, 3 and if in edges, 5. There are some other cases too, but I will leave them for the moment.

    While writing the wrapper, I also got to know some of the cool features and techniques of C++, which I will be writing posts on as soon as I get some time, concepts, traits, avoiding virtual functions and what not. It is commendable that how boost approaches boost::astar_search, there is not a single virtual function, you don’t have to inherit anything (you can though for safety), just templates and traits, you are done.

  • Go Creeping In

    I’ve seen the inside of the Google and Amazon tech stacks. There are common threads that run through them and also, I bet, through most BigTechCos. Here and there down the stack is a lot of C++ and vestigial remnants from earlier days, Perl or PHP or whatever. Out in front of humans, of course, JS. But in between, there are oceans and oceans of Java; to a remarkable degree, it runs the Internet. Except for, here and there, you find a small but steadily increasing proportion of Go.

  • Stand by for FPR14 SPR1 chemspill

    Mozilla has shipped a fix for MFSA2019-18 in Firefox 67.0.3 and 60.7.1. This exploit has been detected in the wild, and while my analysis indicates it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be exploitable in official TenFourFox builds (the Intel versions may be directly exploited, however), it could probably cause drive-by crashes and we should therefore ship an urgent fix as well. The chemspill is currently undergoing confidence tests and I'm shooting to release builds before the weekend. For builders, the only change in FPR14 SPR1 is the patch for bug 1544386, which I will be pushing to the repo just as soon as I have confirmed the fix causes no regressions.

  • PyPI Now Supports Two-Factor Login via WebAuthn
  • Understanding Python assignment
  • How to Publish Your Own Python Package to PyPI
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #373 (June 18, 2019)
  • EuroPython 2019: Community Discounts
  • EuroPython 2019: Inviting European Python Conference Organizers

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux.

Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight.

When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores.

And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course.
.
133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed.

Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE
  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads

    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.”

    To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root.

    Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases.

    That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.

  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019

    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.

  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes

    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications.
    Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.

  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want

    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.

  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight

    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.

NSA Back Doors in Windows Causing Chaos While Media is Obsessing Over DoS Linux Bug

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • U.S. Government Announces Critical Warning For Microsoft Windows Users

    The United States Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has gone public with a warning to Microsoft Windows users regarding a critical security vulnerability. By issuing the "update now" warning, CISA has joined the likes of Microsoft itself and the National Security Agency (NSA) in warning Windows users of the danger from the BlueKeep vulnerability.

    This latest warning, and many would argue the one with most gravitas, comes hot on the heels of Yaniv Balmas, the global head of cyber research at security vendor Check Point, telling me in an interview for SC Magazine UK that "it's now a race against the clock by cyber criminals which makes this vulnerability a ticking cyber bomb." Balmas also predicted that it will only be "a matter of weeks" before attackers started exploiting BlueKeep.

    The CISA alert appears to confirm this, stating that it has, "coordinated with external stakeholders and determined that Windows 2000 is vulnerable to BlueKeep." That it can confirm a remote code execution on Windows 2000 might not sound too frightening, this is an old operating system after all, it would be unwise to classify this as an exercise in fear, uncertainty and doubt. Until now, the exploits that have been developed, at least those seen in operation, did nothing more than crash the computer. Achieving remote code execution brings the specter of the BlueKeep worm into view as it brings control of infected machines to the attacker.

  • Netflix uncovers SACK Panic vuln that can bork Linux-based systems

Graphics: AMDVLK Still Hasn't Yet Adopted FreeSync Support, a Look at Hair Renderer In Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDVLK Still Hasn't Yet Adopted FreeSync Support

    While the AMDGPU kernel driver has shipped with the long-awaited FreeSync support since the Linux 5.0 release earlier this year and was quickly wired up for the RadeonSI Gallium3D OpenGL driver in Mesa 19.0 while the recent Mesa 19.1 update brought FreeSync for the RADV Vulkan driver, AMDVLK as AMD's official open-source Vulkan driver isn't yet supporting this variable rate refresh technology.

    It's a bit ironic that the AMDVLK Vulkan driver still hasn't done its bit of hooking into the AMDGPU FreeSync support even though the code-base is partially shared with their Windows driver and the unofficial Mesa-based "RADV" Vulkan driver is already shipping with this feature in place. When looking through the latest AMDVLK code, the FreeSync functionality remains absent.

  • VKHR - An AMD-Backed Open-Source Hair Renderer In Vulkan

    VKHR is an open-source, real-time hybrid hair renderer written in Vulkan and developed under the support of AMD/RTG.

    AMD previously worked on some great hair rendering tech with TressFX but now it's being taken to a whole new level with VKHR. VKHR is being led by Erik Jansson of AMD as a real-time hybrid hair renderer "written 100% from scratch in Vulkan" and using C++17 code. VKHR has a built-in ray-tracer based on Intel's Embree technology. And there's even a built-in benchmark for comparing the project's hair rendering performance.

Ubuntu: NGINX on Ubuntu Server 18.04, Pick, Departure From i386 and Pop!_OS 19.04 Overview

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • How to install the latest version of NGINX on Ubuntu Server 18.04

    NGINX is one of the most popular web servers on the planet. It's reliable, scalable, and easy to use. But did you know, if you install NGINX from the default Ubuntu Server 18.04 repositories, the version you get is out of date? You don't want that. In fact, you probably want the most up-to-date stable release of the software.

  • Pick – A Color Picker for Ubuntu with History Support

    For Ubuntu 18.04 and higher, you can easily install the tool from Ubuntu Software as it has been made as snap package.

  • Ubuntu Confirms It’s Dropping All 32-bit Support Going Forward

    Ubuntu has confirmed plans to drop all support for 32-bit (i386) systems going forward, beginning with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release.

    The decision will mean that the distro no longer builds, packages or distributes any 32-bit software, libraries or tools on newer versions of Ubuntu.

    Users of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 32-bit are not affected by today’s announcement and will (should?) continue to work as normal, with access to the existing 32-bit archive.

    But the move will mean they are unable to upgrade to a newer Ubuntu release — nope, not even the next LTS!

    Will such a major sounding change have much of an impact?

    Eh, no, not really.

    Ubuntu says it’s stranding a mere 1% of its current user base on 32-bit version Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (which isn’t terrible place to stay, as it is supported until 2023).

  • i386 architecture will be dropped starting with eoan (Ubuntu 19.10)
    Last year, the Ubuntu developer community considered the question of whether
    to continue carrying forward the i386 architecture in the Ubuntu archive for
    future releases.[1]  The discussion at the time was inconclusive, but in
    light of the strong possibility that we might not include i386 as a release
    architecture in 20.04 LTS, we took the proactive step to disable upgrades
    from 18.04 to 18.10 for i386 systems[2], to avoid accidentally stranding
    users on an interim release with 9 months of support instead of letting them
    continue to run Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with its 5 years of standard support.
    
    
    
    
    In February of this year, I also posted to communicate the timeline in which
    we would take a final decision about i386 support in 20.04 LTS[3], namely,
    that we would decide in the middle of 2019.
    
    
    
    
    The middle of 2019 has now arrived.   The Ubuntu engineering team has
    reviewed the facts before us and concluded that we should not continue to
    carry i386 forward as an architecture.   Consequently, i386 will not be
    included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin
    the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu
    infrastructure.
    
    
    
    
    While this means we will not provide 32-bit builds of new upstream versions
    of libraries, there are a number of ways that 32-bit applications can
    continue to be made available to users of later Ubuntu releases, as detailed
    in [4].   We will be working to polish the 32-bit support story over the
    course of the 19.10 development cycle.  To follow the evolution of this
    support, you can participate in the discourse thread at [5].
  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Drop 32-bit x86 Packages

    Ubuntu and their downstream flavors all stopped shipping x86 32-bit images and now for the 19.10 cycle they have decided to stop their i386 support entirely. Beginning with Ubuntu 19.10, the archive/packages will not be built for x86 32-bit. 

    Longtime Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek announced their decision today that the i386 architecture will be dropped starting with Ubuntu 19.10, affecting all Ubuntu-based platforms / those relying upon the official Ubuntu Eoan archives. 

  • Pop!_OS 19.04 overview | Unleash your potential

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Pop!_OS 19.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

Software Leftovers

Filed under
Software
  • Linux Release Roundup: Fondo, Foliate & Shotcut Video Editor

    A raft of really useful software I’ve mentioned on the site before have scored updates over the past few weeks, so in this post I round ’em up and tell you what’s new!

    Notable for this release recap, all of the apps in this list are available to install from Flathub, the go-to Flatpak app store.

    Not a fan of Flatpak? Developers might not think there’s demand for a differing format, so if you long to sample their software as a Snap or would prefer a PPA, let them know!

    Onwards!

  • The Best Free Software of 2019

    Desktop operating systems like Windows and macOS don't get all the attention anymore. It's a mobile world, but we have not fully abandoned the desktop. The real work (and a lot of the play) of computing requires a full personal computer system. To get the most out of that, you need software.

  • The Collaboration Of Zcash Foundation And Parity Presents To You ‘Zebra’ The First Zcash Client

    On 17th June, Zebra was released by Parity. Zebra is an open source and is licensed under GPL v 3.0.

  • CSS Scroll Snap Updated in Firefox 68

    When Firefox 68 goes to general release next month, it will ship with an updated CSS Scroll Snap specification. This means that Firefox will support the same version of the specification as Chrome and Safari. Scroll snapping will work in the same way across all browsers that implement it.

    In this post, I’ll give you a quick rundown of what scroll snapping is. I will also explain why we had a situation where browsers had different versions of the specification for a time.

Linux Foundation and Open Invention Network Membership Rallies (Making Money From the Name)

Filed under
Linux
  • The Linux Foundation Announces Intent to Form New Foundation to Support osquery Community

    Facebook and the Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced plans to create a new foundation for the osquery project, which will be dedicated to growing and sustaining a neutral osquery ecosystem. Engineers and developers from Dactiv, Facebook, Google, Kolide, Trail of Bits, Uptycs, and other companies who are using osquery have committed to supporting the project under the new Foundation.

    osquery is an open source tool developed by Facebook in 2014 that makes it easier to collect low level system information and detect potential security issues. It works by exposing an operating system as a high-performance relational database. This design makes it possible to easily and efficiently write SQL-based queries to detect and investigate anomalies.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Intent to Form New Foundation to Support osquery Community
  • Open Invention Network Demonstrates its Leadership as History’s Largest Patent Non-Aggression Community by Exceeding 3,000 Licensees

    Open Invention Network (OIN), the largest patent non-aggression community in history, announced today that more than 3,000 organizations have joined its community and granted the OIN license to fellow members. To put this milestone into perspective, in only two years, OIN has increased the size of its community by 50 percent. This indicates the growing importance of open source software (OSS) and is an acknowledgment that patent non-aggression is a vital tenet of the open source community.

Programming/Development: Libhandy, anytime, JetBrains and More

Filed under
Development

Your first robotic arm with Ubuntu Core, coming from Niryo

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Niryo has built a fantastic 6-axis robotic arm called ‘Niryo One’. It is a 3D-printed, affordable robotic arm focused mainly on educational purposes. Additionally, it is fully open source and based on ROS. On the hardware side, it is powered by a Raspberry Pi 3 and NiryoStepper motors, based on Arduino microcontrollers. When we found out all this, guess what we thought? This is a perfect target for Ubuntu Core and snaps!

When the robotic arm came to my hands, the first thing I did was play with Niryo Studio; a tool from Niryo that lets you move the robotic arm, teach sequences to it and store them, and many more things. You can programme the robotic arm with Python or with a graphical editor based on Google’s Blocky. Niryo Studio is a great tool that makes starting on robotics easy and pleasant.

Read more

Games: Seeds of Resilience, Missed Messages, GIGABUSTER, Eagle Island

Filed under
Gaming
  • Turn-based survival villager builder 'Seeds of Resilience' released

    Seeds of Resilience has an interesting idea about survival, with you trying not to die on a deserted island and the full release is now available. The full release comes with 12 missions to unlock characters and learn the game as well as a plain survival mode to go at your own pace and do as you wish.

  • Short free Visual Novel "Missed Messages" has beautiful artwork and a mature subject

    I rarely try Visual Novels, mostly because too many of them are overly lewd in some way. However, Missed Messages is of a different sort and it's quite beautiful.

    Developed by Angela He, it's completely free and surprisingly well done. The theme is quite a mature one too, with it touching on suicide and self-harm. It also touches on romance, there's a few memes (who doesn't love a good meme) and so on. What's striking initially is the artwork, it's seriously good. Great chilled-out soundtrack to go along with it too, the quality here really is impressive.

  • GIGABUSTER, an action platformer inspired by Mega Man Zero and Mega Man X will support Linux

    Available to help fund on Kickstarter, GIGABUSTER is an action platformer taking inspiration from Mega Man Zero and Mega Man X.

    They're very clear on release platforms too which is nice to see, with a mention of a Steam release for "Windows, Mac, and Linux". Interestingly, it's being made with Construct 2, a very interesting HTML5 game creator that I've tinkered with myself and found it to be pretty impressive. Thanks to that, you can try out the early W.I.P demo right in your browser on Game Jolt.

  • After a very impressive demo, Eagle Island is launching on July 11th

    Eagle Island, a game where you run around and throw your loyal owl companion at your enemies (yes really, it's awesome) is set to release on July 11th.

Zorin OS 15, An Overview for First Time Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

This is my first review for Zorin GNU/Linux operating system ever and this is version 15 released at 5 June 2019. Zorin OS is an Ubuntu-based distro with modified GNOME 3 user interface available in 4 different editions: Ultimate, Core, Lite, and Education. This short overview focuses on the Core Edition: it features very friendly and fast desktop, familiar taskbar, complete desktop applications including LibreOffice and GIMP, and Flatpak and Snap supports built-in. It maintains own repositories and PPAs. Zorin OS is suitable to everybody begins trying GNU/Linux. I hope this short article helps everybody to begin Zorin OS.

Read more

Radxa updates Rock Pi 4 with NVMe and debuts PoE HAT and a tiny RK3308-based voice board

Filed under
Linux

Radxa unveiled a 38 x 38mm, $10 and up “Rock Pi S” SBC that runs Linux on a quad -A53 RK3308. There’s also a v1.4 update of the RK3399-based Rock Pi 4 that adds 4MB SPI for booting NVMe drives plus a Rock Pi PoE HAT and a USB 3.0 eMMC adapter.

Radxa, which returned from a long development hiatus last fall with an impressively low-cost, $39 and up Rock Pi 4 SBC equipped with a Rockchip RK3399, has now returned with an updated v1.4 model with NVMe support. The email announcement from Radxa project leader Tom Cubie also previewed a tiny Rock Pi S board for voice applications, a Rock Pi PoE HAT for adding Power-over-Ethernet to the Rock Pi 4, and a USB 3.0 based eMMC reader.

Read more

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 GNOME and display server changes

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 contains some important changes regarding the GNOME graphical interface and the default display server. If you are using a graphical desktop in RHEL 8, the most visible change will be that, by default, the GNOME Shell interface is used. This interface has a different appearance and operation compared to GNOME Classic, the default graphical interface in RHEL 7.

Here, we will cover an overview of the GNOME Shell interface in RHEL 8, and also how to switch to the GNOME Classic interface that is similar to the default interface on RHEL 7. We will also cover the new default display server, Wayland, and how to switch the display server to X.org X11 if needed. Another notable change in RHEL 8 is that the KDE Plasma interface has been removed.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.

NSA Back Doors in Windows Causing Chaos While Media is Obsessing Over DoS Linux Bug

  • U.S. Government Announces Critical Warning For Microsoft Windows Users
    The United States Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has gone public with a warning to Microsoft Windows users regarding a critical security vulnerability. By issuing the "update now" warning, CISA has joined the likes of Microsoft itself and the National Security Agency (NSA) in warning Windows users of the danger from the BlueKeep vulnerability. This latest warning, and many would argue the one with most gravitas, comes hot on the heels of Yaniv Balmas, the global head of cyber research at security vendor Check Point, telling me in an interview for SC Magazine UK that "it's now a race against the clock by cyber criminals which makes this vulnerability a ticking cyber bomb." Balmas also predicted that it will only be "a matter of weeks" before attackers started exploiting BlueKeep. The CISA alert appears to confirm this, stating that it has, "coordinated with external stakeholders and determined that Windows 2000 is vulnerable to BlueKeep." That it can confirm a remote code execution on Windows 2000 might not sound too frightening, this is an old operating system after all, it would be unwise to classify this as an exercise in fear, uncertainty and doubt. Until now, the exploits that have been developed, at least those seen in operation, did nothing more than crash the computer. Achieving remote code execution brings the specter of the BlueKeep worm into view as it brings control of infected machines to the attacker.
  • Netflix uncovers SACK Panic vuln that can bork Linux-based systems