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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 22 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Coldwar Goes Gold

Filed under
Gaming

The developers of Linux Game Publishing (LGP) recently finished with the final version of Coldwar.

Kubuntu 6.06 LTS - An excellent Linux distribution based on KDE

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

By the time I received the Kubuntu CD, I was very excited and raring to check out what Kubuntu had in store for the Linux users. I found that there is a great level of overlap between Kubuntu and Ubuntu in that the way it boots up is the same for both the distributions.

Digium Integrates rPath’s rBuilder Solution

Filed under
Linux

rPath, provider of the first platform for creating and maintaining Linux software appliances, today announced that Digium® Inc., original creator of Asterisk™ and pioneer of open source telephony is an rBuilder and rPath Linux partner.

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Secure Debian System Using FireHOL Firewall

Filed under
Linux

FireHOL is a stateful iptables packet filtering firewall configurator. It is abstracted, extensible, easy and powerful. It can handle any kind of firewall, but most importantly, it gives you the means to configure it, the same way you think of it.

Read Full article here

Released GoblinX Mini 1.4.0

Filed under
Linux

The GoblinX Mini 1.4.0 is released with several important improvments.

Ubuntu Linux 6.06 Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Linux 6.06 was delayed for several weeks to ensure that it was as good as it could be, then finally released on June 1. This version of Ubuntu was supposed to be "enterprise-ready" as a server and as a desktop, but unless businesses like dealing with multiple hardware issues, a substandard Java environment, and a lack of proprietary Web browser plugins, I can't see how Ubuntu Linux 6.06 is ready for anything except perhaps a patch release.

Emacs tips: Checking spelling and syntax

Filed under
HowTos

Even the Emacs-enlightened are still but humble human beings who may err. We make spelling mistakes in our writing, and syntactical mistakes in our structured documents. So let's take a tour through Emacs' built-in tools for preventing, catching, and correcting mistakes.

Make Dapper Drake Perform on Old Hardware

Filed under
Ubuntu

As a longtime fan of SuSE Linux, I somehow managed to miss the Ubuntu bandwagon. Now I know what I was missing. I recently replaced SuSE 10.1 with Ubuntu 6.06, also known as Dapper Drake, on my main PC in a matter of minutes, and am now enjoying a clean, feature-rich computing environment that is easy to configure and just works.

Illarion is available for Linux now

Filed under
Gaming

Illarion is a free, completely self developed graphical fantasy game that focuses on true roleplaying. We are offering our own server, a Java client (which can be used at Linux or Windows) and the guarantee that you will never ever pay anything for this game.

Will Linux Rule The Digital Home?

Filed under
Sci/Tech

For consumer electronics industry, digital home is the next big pot of gold, a pot so big that it has everyone from Apple (AAPL) to Microsoft (MSFT) to Intel (INTC) licking their chops. But it is Linux could emerge as one of the biggest winners in this bonanza.

System Administration: Another Step toward the BIND - IV

Filed under
HowTos

In this session we're going to look at a zone file listed in our named.conf file.

Why I ditched my Mac for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Based on the title of this treatise of mine you are, likely, safe in your assumption that I am about to tell you all, using the bestest words my mind can muster, why I stopped using MacOS X and switched over to Linux. The distro I settled on at this point is Ubuntu.

ClarkConnect - Enterprise Linux for Your Home

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Ever wonder how you could get a solid Security Enhanced Enterprise Grade Linux Router/Server with ftp, apache, traffic shaping, pop-up blocker, content filter, intrusion detection/prevention, and other nice handy tools that every robust server should have...and here's the kicker...installed and running in about 30 minutes in your home?

The Five Coding Styles and Linux

Filed under
Software

A long time ago, there was a simple debate on what kind of indenting should you be using and where should you place curly braces: it was the dispute "ANSI vs. K&R". Recently though, I noticed that 4 years ago, Greg Kroah-Hartman forced the use of the Linux (Linus) coding standards in the kernel! Let's see however what are the five existing coding styles.

growing ext3 partition on RAID1 without rebooting

Filed under
HowTos

Although rather straightforward, I couldn't find an easy step-by-step guide, so here I'll describe how I ended up growing my ext3 partion on a RAID-1 array.

Review: Kate OS 3.0 Beta

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Though I am unsure when the project began, Kate OS has been around for a little while. 2.0 was released early last year and was well received. Fast forward more than a year later, and we see 3.0 final on the horizon. Kate OS is a Polish lightweight distribution for Linux users who want control over their system and want access to some great functionality. The lightweight part is evidenced by Xfce4 being the default desktop environment.

Red Hat and SUSE solidify market positions

Filed under
Linux

Although dozens of Linux distributions are available, only two have garnered significant acceptance among corporate users. Those two -- Red Hat Inc.'s Enterprise Linux and Novell Inc.'s SUSE -- are poised to leverage their strengths for greater market share while also warding off new entrants into the enterprise Linux market.

TUX Mag Converts to Paid-Circulation

SSC Publishing, the magazine publishing company dedicated to Linux and Open Source since early 1994, today announced that it is converting its magazine for new and desktop Linux users, TUX, from a controlled-circulation to a paid-circulation magazine, beginning this summer.

On-Disk.com Donations and Big Developer Payouts

Filed under
Linux

The On-Disk.com Developers Portal Celebrates First Anniversary with
Donations and Big Payouts. The Developers Portal generated over $3,000 for independent software and digital media developers in it's first 10 months of operations.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora, Red Hat and IBM Leftovers

  • Feora: How to setup an anonymous FTP download server

    Sometimes you may not need to set up a full FTP server with authenticated users with upload and download privileges. If you are simply looking for a quick way to allow users to grab a few files, an anonymous FTP server can fit the bill. This article shows you show to set it up.

  • Kubernetes networking, OpenStack Train, and more industry trends

    As part of my role as a senior product marketing manager at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends for product marketers, managers, and other influencers. Here are five of my and their favorite articles from that update.

  • How collaboration fueled a development breakthrough at Greenpeace

    We'd managed to launch a prototype of Planet 4, Greenpeace's new, open engagement platform for activists and communities. It's live in more than 38 countries (with many more sites). More than 1.75 million people are using it. We've topped more than 3.1 million pageviews. To get here, we spent more than 650 hours in meetings, drank 1,478 litres of coffee, and fixed more than 300 bugs. But it fell short of our vision; it still wasn't the minimum lovable product we wanted and we didn't know how to move it forward. We were stuck. Planet 4's complexity was daunting. We didn't always have the right people to address the numerous challenges the project raised. We didn't know if we'd ever realize our vision. Yet a commitment to openness had gotten us here, and I knew a commitment to openness would get us through this, too.

  • After Seven Quarters Of Growth, Power Systems Declines

    The tough compares have hit home on IBM’s Power Systems business, but the good news is that this has happened after seven consecutive quarters of growth for the Power-based server business that Big Blue owns lock, stock, and barrel. Even with this decline, which was quite steep because of the triple whammy of tough compares (more on that in a moment), there is still a healthy underlying Power Systems business that is much better off than the last time it was hit by similar declines. Let’s take a look at the numbers for IBM’s Power Systems division and then work our way up through its Systems group and to the company at large. According to the presentation put together by IBM’s chief financial officer, Jim Cavanaugh, to go over the numbers for the third quarter of 2019, the Power Systems division had a decline of 27 percent in constant currency (meaning growth in local currencies aggregated across those economies), with as-reported sales also being down 27 percent. In other words, currency had no effect on the overall Power Systems business even if it did impact IBM’s sales, as reported in U.S. dollars, by 1.3 percent in the period ended in September.

  • Red Hat Government Symposium: Transforming culture and creating open innovation powerhouses

    For state, local and federal government agencies, digital transformation means much more than just migrating away from legacy technology systems. It involves inspiring ideas, encouraging communication and collaboration, and empowering government employees to forge their organizations’ innovation pathways.  That’s why we are focusing on cultural transformation at our upcoming Red Hat Government Symposium. This year’s one-day event—Open transforms: A future built on open source—will be on Nov. 12, 2019, in Washington, D.C., and will feature a stellar lineup of keynotes and panels, as well as fantastic networking opportunities with industry peers.  

  • Journey to the Future of Money with Red Hat at Money 20/20

    Event season is in full swing for the Red Hat Financial services team, and this time, we are headed to the bright lights of Las Vegas to attend Money 20/20 USA, being held from October 27 - 30th. Red Hat will be attending to sponsor a number of activities and discuss the important role open source technologies play in the future of payments, money and banking activities. 

SUSE Leftovers

  • Digital Transformation – it’s dead, Jim?

    However, digital transformation is like life – it’s an ongoing process, not something you just do once and then it’s done and dusted. A large part of digital transformation is your cloud strategy, which I wrote about fairly recently. That is also something that isn’t a one-off task, but is instead an evolving, transformational process. It was interesting to see, after speaking to attendees at the Gartner event in Frankfurt, that a number of them still hadn’t defined their cloud strategy outside of “we need to move everything to the cloud for cost savings and agility”, while some hadn’t even begun writing a cloud strategy. Looking at a chart showing the trends in Google searches for digital transformation in the US (the global trend is the same) over the past 5 years, you can see that while it trends up and then down fairly regularly, it still continues to grow on the whole. So if it’s been around for a while, why does it continue to grow, and is it still relevant?

  • New Security Tools for Application Delivery

    What if you could shut down cybercriminals’ most frequently used method of attack? At SUSE we’ve recently made a move to help you get closer to that goal. As you may know, SUSE recently released new versions of our application delivery solutions, SUSE CaaS Platform 4 and SUSE Cloud Application Platform 1.5. The releases contain a number of important updates and features, but the one most exciting in terms of protecting your organization is the addition of Cilium to SUSE CaaS Platform.

Security: Patches, Nostromo, PureBoot and Microsoft's Latest DRM Lock-down (Locking GNU/Linux Out for 'Security')

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (aspell, graphite-web, imagemagick, mediawiki, milkytracker, nfs-utils, and openjdk-11), Fedora (kernel, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, mediawiki, and radare2), openSUSE (dhcp, libpcap, lighttpd, and tcpdump), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Slackware (python), SUSE (bluez, kernel, and python-xdg), and Ubuntu (aspell).

  • Nostromo web servers exposed by resurrected RCE vulnerability

    A security researcher has disclosed the existence of a remote code execution (RCE) vulnerability in the open source Nostromo web server software. On Monday, a threat analyst and bounty hunter with the online handle Sudoka published a technical analysis of the bug, tracked as CVE-2019-16278. The vulnerability impacts Nostromo, also known as nhttpd, a niche web server used by some in the Unix and open source community but altogether dwarfed in popularity by Apache. In a blog post, Sudoka said the vulnerability stems from shortcomings in how the path of URLs are verified. Inadequate URL checks mean that an unauthenticated attackers is able to force a server to point to a shell file, resulting in the potential execution of arbitrary code.

  • PureBoot Best Practices

    Recently we started offering the PureBoot Bundle–PureBoot installed and configured on your laptop at the factory and bundled with a pre-configured Librem Key so you can detect tampering from the moment you unbox your laptop. It’s been great to see so many customers select the PureBoot Bundle and now that PureBoot is on so many more customer laptops, we felt it was a good time to write up a post to describe some best practices when using PureBoot. If you are just getting started with PureBoot and want to know the basics, check out our Getting Started Guide for pointers on what to do when you start up your PureBoot Bundle for the first time. In this post I’ll assume you have already gone through the first boot and first reboot of your laptop and have settled into daily use.

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  • Secured-core PCs offer new defense against firmware attacks
                     
                       

    Microsoft, chipmakers, and several PC makers on Monday announced Secured-core PCs, which use hardware-based defense mechanisms to combat firmware-level security attacks.

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  • Microsoft's New Plan to Defend the Code Deep Within PCs
                     
                       

    The idea of secured-core PC is to take firmware out of that equation, eliminating it as a link in the chain that determines what's trustworthy on a system. Instead of relying on firmware, Microsoft has worked with AMD, Intel, and Qualcomm to make new central processing unit chips that can run integrity checks during boot in a controlled, cryptographically verified way. Only the chip manufacturers will hold the encryption keys to broker these checks, and they're burned onto the CPUs during manufacturing rather than interacting with the firmware's amorphous, often unreliable code layer.

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Games: Remote Play Together, OpenRA, The Coma 2, Humble Store and Shiver

  • Steam 'Remote Play Together' is now in Beta, allowing local multiplayer games over the net

    Today, Valve have released an exciting update to the Steam Beta Client which adds in Remote Play Together, allowing you to play local co-op, local multiplayer and shared/split screen games over the net with your friends. From what Valve said, it will allow up to four players "or even more in ideal conditions", meaning if you all have reasonable internet connections you might be able to play with quite a few people. Something that has of course been done elsewhere, although the advantage here is no extra payments or software needed as it runs right from the Steam client. It's very simply done too. Just like you would invite friends to join your online game, you invite them to Remote Play Together from the Steam Friends list and if they accept…away you go. Only the host needs to own the game too, making it easy to get going.

  • Another OpenRA preview build is up needing testing, Tiberian Sun support is coming along

    Work continues on the open source game engine OpenRA which allows you to play Command & Conquer, Red Alert and Dune 2000 on Linux and other modern platforms with support for Tiberian Sun progressing well. [...] One issue they've been dealing with is deployable units in Tiberian Sun, while OpenRA had basic support for the feature due to the Construction Yards in classic C&C it wasn't suitable for Tiberian Sun. Now though? They've overhauled it and expanded it. You can now queue up deploy commands between other orders, deployable units can be ordered to pack up and then move somewhere else as a single action too. Additionally, the code for aircraft and helicopter movement has also been given an overhaul to add in many of the extra features and dynamics needed for Banshees, Orcas, and Carryalls. The transport behaviour for the Carryall was also updated, with unit pick-up behaviour closer to the original game and allowing you to queue up multiple transport runs.

  • Devespresso Games join with Headup for Western release of The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters

    The Korean survival horror-adventure The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters from Devespresso Games is now getting a helping hand from publisher Headup for Western audiences. Also confirmed through the press emails is that The Coma 2 will be entering Steam Early Access on November 5th, with a full release expected in "Q1 2020".

  • Humble Store is doing a Female Protagonist Sale, plus the upcoming Steam sale dates leaked

    The week has only just begun and there's plenty of sales going on, with even more coming up. Let's have a little look. First up, Humble Store is doing a Female Protagonist Sale celebrating various heroines across multiple genres.

  • Kowai Sugoi Studios close up so they've made their point & click horror 'Shiver' free

    Times are tough for indies, with Kowai Sugoi Studios announcing they're closing up shop and so they've set their point and click horror title Shiver free for everyone. Kowai Sugoi Studios said in a blog post on the official site that this month they're shutting down, no reason for it was given but they gave their "sincere appreciation to our friends, family, and fans" for supporting them along the way. Shiver seems to be their only game, released originally back in 2017.