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Saturday, 17 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux 5.4 To Expose What's Keeping The System Awake Via Sysfs

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Linux

The next Linux kernel version will expose the real-time sources of what's keeping the system awake via Sysfs compared to existing source information that previously was only available via DebugFS.

With Linux 5.4, wakeup source statistics will now be exposed under /sys/class/wakeup/wakeup*/ for tracking wakeups, their counts, and related bits for profiling the system for power usage optimizations.

Suspend-blocking wakeup sources have been available under DebugFS to be useful for bug reporting and analyzing battery consumption. This solidifies the work now under Sysfs with a stable ABI. In addition to the interfaces now stable in adding them to sysfs, it makes them more accessible compared to DebugFS often being restricted to root or other restrictions in place by different distribution kernels.

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Chrome murders FTP like Jeffrey Epstein

Filed under
Google
Web

What is it with these people? Why can't things that are working be allowed to still go on working? (Blah blah insecure blah blah unused blah blah maintenance blah blah web everything.)

This leaves an interesting situation where Google has, in its very own search index, HTML pages served by FTP its own browser won't be able to view...

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Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Creating a Docker Swarm Stack with Terraform (Terrascript Python), Persistent Volumes and Dynamic HAProxy.

    Before someone blame me about why I am not using Kubernetes, AWS ECS, Mesos or anything but Swarm the answer is simple: Docker Swarm is an inexpensive and very simple thin orchestrator. Because of this it miss a lot of features that Kubernetes already implemented by default. Most of important data centers (Google, AWS, Azure, Oracle, IBM, Digital Ocean, etc) already implemented some sort of Kubernetes as a Service make it easy its adoption. However, docker swarm does not have any datacenter are implementing it and are creating some of structure ready to go as K8s has.

  • Python Filter()

    Python filter() function applies another function on a given iterable (List/String/Dictionary, etc.) to test which of its item to keep or discard. In simple words, it filters the ones that don’t pass the test and returns the rest as a filter object.

    The filter object is of the iterable type. It retains those elements which the function passed by returning True. We can also convert it to List or Tuple or other types using their factory functions.

    In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to use the filter() function with different types of sequences. Also, you can refer to the examples that we’ve added to bring clarity.

  • Sending HTML messages with Net::XMPP (Perl)

    This started with a very simple need: wanting to improve the notifications I’m receiving from various sources.

  • Excellent Free Books to Master Programming

    A quick search of the internet reveals a plethora of books for programmers. No one has time to read even a minuscule fraction of the available books.

    What you need is a curated list of programming books. Better than that. A curated list of free programming books. Free and open source books still have a cost — your time. And just because a book is free/open source doesn’t, itself, signify any great quality to the work. Hence the need for some recommendations for free books to help you learn C, C++, Java, Python, R, or whatever language takes your fancy.

    The books we’re recommending will help increase your technical skills and make you proficient in the language of your choice. And some of them even provide a little light relief on the way. Humor can be a great aid to learning.

Anime studio, Khara, is planning to use open-source Blender software

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OSS

The open-source 3D creation software, Blender, will be picked up by the Japanese anime studio, Khara. It’ll begin partially using the software for its current development ‘EVANGELION:3.0+1.0’ but will make the full switch once that project is finished. The current project is expected to end in June next year, so after that point, its employees will start using Blender for the majority of their work.

At the moment, Khara uses 3ds Max from Autodesk on a subscription basis; however, the company found that it had to reach out to small and medium-sized businesses for its projects. Due to the limitations of those companies, it’s harder for them to afford 3ds Max. By switching to Blender, Khara says it can work better with external firms.

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FOSS From Australian Signals Directorate (ASD)

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OSS
  • Australian Signals Directorate open sources data analysis tool

    The security agency described Constellation as a NetBeans Java application that can be “used to inform decision making and advance data-driven innovation”. The source code has been released under the Apache License 2.0.

  • ASD makes in-house data analysis app open source

    The Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) has released an open source version of its in-house data visualisation and analysis tool, Constellation, connecting the security agency with the outer world.

    The tool — which is available via GitHub — was designed to help “inform decision-making and advance data-driven innovation” and can be used to “solve large and complex problems in a simple and intuitive way”, according to the agency.

today's leftovers: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Fedora Program Management, Security and More

Filed under
Misc
  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/33

    Week 2019/33 ‘only’ saw three snapshots being published (3 more were given to openQA but discarded).

  • FPgM report: 2019-33

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. (Just not this week because I will be traveling)

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (freetype, libreoffice, and openjdk-7), Fedora (edk2, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, mariadb-connector-odbc, python-django, and squirrelmail), Gentoo (chromium, cups, firefox, glibc, kconfig, libarchive, libreoffice, oracle-jdk-bin, polkit, proftpd, sqlite, wget, zeromq, and znc), openSUSE (bzip2, chromium, dosbox, evince, gpg2, icedtea-web, java-11-openjdk, java-1_8_0-openjdk, kconfig, kdelibs4, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, nodejs8, pdns, polkit, python, subversion, and vlc), Oracle (ghostscript and kernel), Red Hat (mysql:8.0 and subversion:1.10), SUSE (389-ds, libvirt and libvirt-python, and openjpeg2), and Ubuntu (nginx).

  • A compendium of container escapes

    My name is Brandon Edwards, I’m Chief Scientist at Capsule8. Today we’ll be talking about a compendium of container escapes in the podcast. We’ve previously talked about escaping containers and the sorts of vulnerabilities people should be concerned with a while back. In particular we’re discussing how the RunC vulnerability had engendered all this interest, or concern, or almost shock, the trust the people are placing in containers was broken. Oh wow, an escape could happen!

    I think it’s really valuable to be able to communicate and show all the other ways that that sort of thing can happen, either from misconfiguration, or over granting privileges, or providing host mounts into the container, or having kernel vulnerabilities that could somehow compromise any of the elements of the security model of container, which is both fragile and complex.

  • Apollo data graph brings managed federation to enterprises

    Data graph vendor Apollo is aiming to help overcome several obstacles to enterprises using graph databases with its latest Apollo Data Graph Platform update, which became generally available on July 16.

    Among the key new features in the platform are federated management capabilities that enable more scalability across different GraphQL data graph instances. GraphQL is an open source query language for APIs, originally created by Facebook that is used to enable data graph capabilities.

Videos: Pardus and Linux Action News

Filed under
GNU
Linux

today's howtos, LibreOffice development, 'DevOps' and programming leftovers

Filed under
Development
HowTos
  • How to use apt Command in Linux
  • FreeBSD Display Information About The System Hardware
  • btLr text direction in Writer, part 4

    You can get a snapshot / demo of Collabora Office and try it out yourself right now: try unstable snapshot. Collabora is a major contributor to LibreOffice and all of this work will be available in TDF’s next release, too (6.4).

  • LibreOffice Community at FrOSCon 2019

    LibreOffice development takes place mostly via the internet: volunteers, certified developers and other community members collaborate on programming, design, quality assurance, documentation and other tasks. But we also like to meet up in person, to share information, bring new people into the project, and have fun!

    So on the weekend of 10 and 11 August, we attended FrOSCon 2019 in Sankt Augustin, a town just outside Bonn, Germany. FrOSCon is one of the largest free and open source software (FOSS) conferences in the country, with around 2,000 attendees. Most of the visitors know about FOSS already, but some had only learnt about it recently, and were eager to discover more.

  • 10 ways DevOps helps digital transformation

    DevOps helps organizations succeed with digital transformation by shifting the cultural mindset of the business, breaking down detrimental silos, and paving the way for continuous change and rapid experimentation: All those elements help organizations meet evolving customer demands, experts point out. This helps organizations “self-steer” toward better solutions to continually improve, says Matthew Skelton, head of consulting at Conflux and co-author of Team Topologies.

  • CloudBees Advances State of the DevOps World

    At its annual user conference, CloudBees previews a new Software Delivery Management platform as the DevOps vendor celebrates 15 years of Jenkins.

  • How do you verify that PyPI can be trusted?

    Now Go's packaging story is rather different from Python's since in Go you specify the location of a module by the URL you fetch it from, e.g. github.com/you/hello specifies the hello module as found at https://github.com/you/hello. This means Go's module ecosystem is distributed, which leads to interesting problems of caching so code doesn't disappear off the internet (e.g. a left-pad incident), and needing to verify that a module's provider isn't suddenly changing the code they provide with something malicious.

    But since the Python community has PyPI our problems are slightly different in that we just have to worry about a single point of failure (which has its own downsides). Now obviously you can run your own mirror of PyPI (and plenty of companies do), but for the general community no one wants to bother to set something up like that and try to keep it maintained (do you really need your own mirror to download some dependencies for the script you just wrote to help clean up your photos from your latest trip?). But we should still care about whether PyPI has been compromised such that packages hosted there have not been tampered with somehow between when the project owner uploaded their release's files and from when you download them.

  • Spyder 4.0 beta4: Kite integration is here

    As part of our next release, we are proud to announce an additional completion client for Spyder, Kite. Kite is a novel completion client that uses Machine Learning techniques to find and predict the best autocompletion for a given text. Additionally, it collects improved documentation for compiled packages, i.e., Matplotlib, NumPy, SciPy that cannot be obtained easily by using traditional code analysis packages such as Jedi.

Events: DebConf19, PyBay 2019, IndieWeb Summit 2019, Cloud Foundry Summit and Open Infrastructure Summit

Filed under
OSS
  • DebConf19: Brazil

    My first DebConf was DebConf4, held in Porte Alegre, Brazil back in 2004. Uncle Steve did the majority of the travel arrangements for 6 of us to go. We had some mishaps which we still tease him about, but it was a great experience. So when I learnt DebConf19 was to be in Brazil again, this time in Curitiba, I had to go. So last November I realised flights were only likely to get more expensive, that I’d really kick myself if I didn’t go, and so I booked my tickets. A bunch of life happened in the meantime that mean the timing wasn’t particularly great for me - it’s been a busy 6 months - but going was still the right move.

    One thing that struck me about DC19 is that a lot of the faces I’m used to seeing at a DebConf weren’t there. Only myself and Steve from the UK DC4 group made it, for example. I don’t know if that’s due to the travelling distances involved, or just the fact that attendance varies and this happened to be a year where a number of people couldn’t make it. Nonetheless I was able to catch up with a number of people I only really see at DebConfs, as well as getting to hang out with some new folk.

    Given how busy I’ve been this year and expect to be for at least the next year I set myself a hard goal of not committing to any additional tasks. That said DebConf often provides a welcome space to concentrate on technical bits. I reviewed and merged dkg’s work on WKD and DANE for the Debian keyring under debian.org - we’re not exposed to the recent keyserver network issues due to the fact the keyring is curated, but providing additional access to our keyring makes sense if it can be done easily. I spent some time with Ian Jackson talking about dgit - I’m not a user of it at present, but I’m intrigued by the potential for being able to do Debian package uploads via signed git tags. Of course I also attended a variety of different talks (and, as usual, at times the schedule conflicted such that I had a difficult choice about which option to chose for a particular slot).

  • PyBay 2019: Talking about Python in SF

    We are back to San Francisco! Our team will be joining PyBay's conference, one of the biggest Python events in the Bay Area. For this year, we'll be giving the talk: Building effective Django queries with expressions.

    PyBay has been a fantastic place to meet new people, connect with new ideas, and integrate this thriving community.

  • Tantek Çelik: IndieWebCamps Timeline 2011-2019: Amsterdam to Utrecht

    While not a post directly about IndieWeb Summit 2019, this post provides a bit of background and is certainly related, so I’m including it in my series of posts about the Summit. Previous post in this series: Reflecting On IndieWeb Summit: A Start

    [...]

    I don’t know of any tools to take something like this kind of locations vs years data and graph it as such. So I built an HTML table with a cell for each IndieWebCamp, as well as cells for the colspans of empty space. Each colored cell is hyperlinked to the IndieWebCamp for that city for that year.

  • Meet SUSE at Cloud Foundry Summit in The Hague

    If you’re looking for a great excuse to visit the Netherlands, learn about Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes, and hang out with a cool and interesting community, come meet the SUSE Cloud Application Platform team at the Cloud Foundry Summit EU in The Hague. SUSE is a gold sponsor of the event, so we’ll have a booth complete with live demos and plenty of the cool chameleons that you’ve come to expect of us. 

  • Helping The Hispanic/Latinx Community With Open Source | Open Infrastructure Summit, 2019

    At the Open Infrastructure Summit, 2019, we sat down with Joseph Sandoval, SRE Manager for the Adobe Advertising Cloud platform, to talk about the work he is doing with the Hispanic/Latinx Community.

Debian celebrates 26 years, Happy DebianDay!

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Debian

26 years ago today in a single post to the comp.os.linux.development newsgroup, Ian Murdock announced the completion of a brand new Linux release named ##Debian.

Since that day we’ve been into outer space, typed over 1,288,688,830 lines of code, spawned over 300 derivatives, were enhanced with 6,155 known contributors, and filed over 975,619 bug reports.

We are home to a community of thousands of users around the globe, we gather to host our annual Debian Developers Conference #DebConf">DebConf which spans the world in a different country each year, and of course today's many "#DebianDay celebrations held around the world.

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Games: ACardShooter, Mable & The Wood and Wine 4.14

Filed under
Gaming
  • Twin-stick shooting combined with deck-building, ACardShooter is out now

    Deck-building is all the rage and now it's come to twin-stick shooters too, with ACardShooter now available on Steam with Linux support. 

  • Hunt down beasts, take their power and possibly save the world in Mable & The Wood, releasing soon

    Mable & The Wood is a Metroidvania that's possibly nothing like any other. One with multiple endings and it's possible to do it without killing anything.

    I've been excited about this game for so long, after discovering it a while ago and it was announced today that it's going to be releasing on August 23rd! It captured my interest due to the unusual heroine, who carries around a sword too big to swing and it's how you use the sword that makes it truly sweet. You stick it in the ground, then use your powers to recall it as it slices its way back to you.

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 4.14 is now available.

  • Not quite time to wine down yet, with Wine 4.14 released to lift your spirits

    The Wine team also recently announced the next WineConf, the Wine Project's annual conference. Taking place in Toronto, Canada between October 12th - 13th. You can see the full details on it here.

    I heard through the grapevine that some people say I do a pour job at this pun business, I'll deal with such things on a case by case basis. *checks notes*, nope haven't used those before. I'll see myself out.

Jetson Nano based robotics kit connects to SparkFun sensors

Filed under
Linux

SparkFun has launched a version of Nvidia’s Jetson Nano based JetBot AI Kit robotics kit equipped with its Qwiic pHat, a wide-angle camera, and more. Also new: a SparkFun DLI Kit for Jetson Nano to use in conjunction with an Nvidia AI course.

When Nvidia launched its Linux-powered Jetson Nano module and $99 Jetson Nano Development Kit in March, it posted specs and instructions on GitHub for using the kit to build out a mobile JetBot robot. In late July, Waveshare launched a JetBot AI Kit based on the design available with ($216) or without ($100) the Nano Dev Kit. Now SparkFun has released a more advanced — and expensive — version of the open source robotics kit selling for $275 with the Nano Dev Kit or $175 without. SparkFun also launched a SparkFun DLI Kit for Jetson Nano focused on deep learning (see farther below).

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Slackel Linux Works Well Inside Its Openbox

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The current Slackel Linux release can be a good choice for new users. It is easy to stumble through the installation steps, but this distro has some benefits.

Slackel is a reliable operating system that is easy to use. If you like to learn how Linux works, Slackel gets you closer to understanding the pure Linux environment without resorting to the terminal window and the command line.

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Things You Should Know About Linux Instant Messaging Programs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

One of the highly-desirable features of Linux – a primary reason that developers prefer it to other operating systems – is that it has been improved with a lot of free and open-source program. Many of the above platforms reflect this, making them powerful options for growing businesses looking into their software options as they scale. They’re also strong options for businesses for whom security is the highest priority, which is becoming a greater focus for organizations every day.

From personal to professional, Linux-based instant messaging programs can offer you flexibility, communication, and security. If you’re running a Linux operating platform, make sure you look into this list of mainstream and alternative chat options for a reliable and robust messenger experience.

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Linux and Hardware: XScale IOP, Adlink and eMMC Flash Memory

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux 5.4 Set To Remove Intel XScale IOP33X/IOP13XX CPU Support

    Linux 5.4 is set to remove the Intel IOP33X and IOP13XX series of processors that are part of the company's former XScale product line for ARM-based CPUs. 

    The XScale IOP processors were intended for handling I/O offloading from the main device CPU. These sub-1.2GHz processors were part of Intel's ARMv8.5-based XScale product portfolio. But with no apparent users of the Intel IOP33X/IOP13XX hardware left -- at least anyone that would likely be riding new Linux kernel releases -- that support is going to be removed later this year with the Linux 5.4 release. 

  • Type 2 customers can now update to Skylake and Kaby Lake

    Adlink has released two Linux-ready COM Express Basic Type 2 modules for legacy customers: The Express-SL2 offers Intel 6th Gen and the Express-KL2 features 7th Gen processors.

    Back in 2014, Adlink launched a pair of COM Express Type 2 drop-in replacement modules running on Intel 4th Gen. Core (Express-HL2) and Bay Trail Atom (cExpress-BT2). We had thought that might be the end of Type 2 replacement products. Yet, there are still many customers that are not ready to move to the identically sized (125 x 95mm) Basic Type 6. As a result, Adlink is back with the 6th Gen Skylake Express-SL2 and 7th Gen Kaby Lake Express-KL2 to keep legacy Type 2 customers up to date “for at least another 10 years,” says the company.

  • Wear Estimation for Devices with eMMC Flash Memory

Canonical Outs Major Linux Kernel Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Ubuntu

Available for Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 ESM (Trusty Tahr), the new Linux kernel security updates are here to patch more than 30 security vulnerabilities, including a heap buffer overflow discovered in the Marvell Wireless LAN device driver and a NULL pointer dereference discovered in the Near-field communication (NFC) implementation.

The security patch also addresses a use-after-free vulnerability discovered by Google Project Zero's Jann Horn in the Linux kernel when accessing LDT entries, as well as a race condition when performing core dumps. A flaw discovered by Andrei Vlad Lutas and Dan Lutas in x86 processors, which incorrectly handled SWAPGS instructions during speculative execution, was fixed as well.

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