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Tuesday, 16 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Mageia 7.1, Mageia 7 with Ryzen 3000 hardware support

Filed under
MDV

The timing for Mageia 7, just prior to the recent release of the new AMD Ryzen 3000 series of CPU’s, didn’t play nicely. Namely, there was an issue with the system starting up on these new CPU’s that prevented any type of installation, except for a net install. So, the only solution was to release a new set of installation media, which are available to download here.

It’s very important to note that if you have a working system, there is nothing that you need to address. This release is primarily to fix installation on systems with the above CPU’s.

Read more

Also: Mageia 7.1 Released With Systemd Fix For AMD Ryzen 3000 Systems

Linux Mint 19.2 “Tina” Cinnamon – BETA Release

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint 19.2 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2023. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

Read more

Also: Linux Mint 19.2 "Tina" Available In Beta Form

Firefox 69 Beta On Linux Bringing Better Performance

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF

With the recent release of Mozilla Firefox 68 there are some nice WebRender performance improvements that Linux users can enjoy. But with Firefox 69 now in beta there is even better performance, including when enabling WebRender on Linux.

Given the recent Firefox 68.0 release and Firefox 69.0 being promoted to beta, I ran some fresh browser benchmarks for checking out the current state of Mozilla's Linux performance from the Ubuntu desktop. The official Mozilla Firefox binaries for Linux x86_64 67.0.4, 68.0, and 69.0b3 were tested on the same system in a variety of browser benchmarks.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Btrfs Gets Cleaned Up & Code Refactoring For Linux 5.3

    David Sterba sent in the Btrfs file-system updates on Monday for the Linux 5.3 kernel.

    Btrfs for Linux 5.3 doesn't present any shiny new features but is mostly focused on bug fixes and low-level code improvements.

    One of the internal changes worth pointing out for Btrfs is changing its CRC32C usage so that it can be hardware-assisted on more architectures where native instructions or optimized code paths are available. More Btrfs code has also been positioned for more checksum algorithms moving forward.

  • g_array_binary_search in GLib 2.61.2

    The final API so far in this mini-series on new APIs in the GLib 2.62 series is g_array_binary_search(), put together by Emmanuel Fleury and based on code by Christian Hergert. It’s due to be released in 2.61.2 soon. But first, a reminder about GLib version numbering.

    Like the rest of GNOME’s official module set, GLib follows an odd/even versioning scheme, where every odd minor version number, like 2.61.x, is an unstable release building up to an even minor version number, like 2.62.x, which is stable. APIs may be added in unstable releases. They may be modified or even removed (if they haven’t been in a stable release yet). So all of the APIs I’ve blogged about recently still have a chance to be tweaked or dropped if people find problems with them. So if you see a problem or think that one of these APIs would be awkward to use in some way, please say, sooner rather than later! They need fixing before they’re in a stable release.

  • Rabimba: ARCore and Arkit: What is under the hood : Anchors and World Mapping (Part 1)

    Some of you know I have been recently experimenting a bit more with WebXR than a WebVR and when we talk about mobile Mixed Reality, ARkit and ARCore is something which plays a pivotal role to map and understand the environment inside our applications.

    I am planning to write a series of blog posts on how you can start developing WebXR applications now and play with them starting with the basics and then going on to using different features of it. But before that, I planned to pen down this series of how actually the "world mapping" works in arcore and arkit. So that we have a better understanding of the Mixed Reality capabilities of the devices we will be working with.

  • 10 Best Automated Backup Plugins for WordPress in 2019

    As an online business owner and/or site administrator it is important that you are always ahead of probable data damage by having a data contingency plan. On WordPress, this process has been simplified for all levels of users in the form of backup plugins that can enable you to automate full or partial backups which you can easily restore from later on.

    Today, we bring you a list of the 10 best plugins for backing up your WordPress site. They all feature a clean modern UI, in active development with millions of downloads, and most of them are 100% free!

today's howtos and software bits

Filed under
HowTos

Security: Windows, Books, Apple and More

Filed under
Security
  • Windows 7 Enters the Last Six Months of Support [Ed: Microsoft propagandist (for ages) Bogdan Popa won't advise people to hop over to GNU/Linux (which he lies about, saying Microsoft "loves Linux")]

    According to third-party data provided by NetMarketShare, Windows 7 continues to be one of the most popular choices for desktop users.

  • Security bootcamp: 8 must-read books for leaders

    The threat of cybercrime constantly looms over business leaders – and it becomes more urgent as cyber attacks become more sophisticated. In 2019, security breaches happen more frequently, and the associated financial hit has increased, according to research from Accenture.

    Notably, the report points out that hackers increasingly target humans – the “weakest link in cyber defenses” – at all levels of organizations, through tactics like ransomware and phishing. (Witness the recent wave of ransomware attacks against U.S. cities, large and small.) That’s why it’s becoming essential for everyone – not just security professionals – to be well-versed in risk and their organization’s security efforts.

  • Security scanning your DevOps pipeline

    Security is one of the most important considerations for running in any environment, and using open source software is a great way to handle security without going over budget in your corporate environment or for your home setup. It is easy to talk about the concepts of security, but it's another thing to understand the tools that will get you there. This tutorial explains how to set up security using Jenkins with Anchore.

    There are many ways to run Kubernetes. Using Minikube, a prepackaged virtual machine (VM) environment designed for local testing, reduces the complexity of running an environment.

  • This Is Why We Have Betas. iOS 13 Beta Shows Saved Passwords

    There’s a reason we have beta versions of software: all the kinks need to be worked out. This is also why using beta versions always come with warnings and disclaimers that you’re using the software at your own risk.

    Users of the iOS 13 beta have discovered that there’s a bug that makes it easy to access the data in “Website & App Passwords” in the Settings app. Certainly, this is something Apple needs to get fixed before the official release, expected for September.

  • Hackers breached Bulgaria’s tax agency and leaked the data of 5M people

    Bulgaria has suffered what has been described as the biggest data leak in its history. The stolen data, which hackers emailed to local media on July 15, originates from the country’s tax reporting service – the National Revenue Agency (NRA).

    The breach contains the personal data of 5 million citizens, local outlet Capital reports. To put that into perspective, Bulgaria has a population of 7 million. Among other things, the trove includes personal identifiable numbers, addresses, and even income data.

Hardware: ASUS Chromebooks, MacBook Air Slowdowns, Exploding 'i' Things and Planned Obsolescence

Filed under
Hardware
  • Acer Chromebook R 11
  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C302CA
  • ASUS Chromebook C202SA
  • The 2019 MacBook Air Has 35% Slower SSD Than 2018 Model

    Tests were conducted on MacBook Air variants with different internal storage options and the drop in the write speeds were witnessed in every variant regardless of the internal storage.

  • 11-Year-Old Girl’s iPhone 6 Exploded Burning Holes In Blanket

    With smartphones from various tech companies falling prey to the exploding game, it seems like it’s Apple’s turn, as this time an iPhone caught fire in Bakersfield, California.

    It is suggested that 11-year-old Kayla Ramos was sitting in her sister’s bedroom and was holding the iPhone 6 in her hands. She mostly used it for watching YouTube videos and sometimes gave it to her younger siblings.

  • How many kinds of USB-C™ to USB-C™ cables are there?

    Why did it come to this? This problem was created because the USB-C connectors were designed to replace all of the previous USB connectors at the same time as vastly increasing what the cable could do in power, data, and display dimensions. The new connector may be and virtually impossible to plug in improperly (no USB superposition problem, no grabbing the wrong end of the cable), but sacrificed for that simplicity is the ability to intuitively know whether the system you've connected together has all of the functionality possible. The USB spec also cannot simply mandate that all USB-C cables have the maximum number of wires all the time because that would vastly increase BOM cost for cases where the cable is just used for charging primarily.

    How can we fix this? Unfortunately, it's a tough problem that has to involve user education. [...]

Programming: Thread Synchronization, Python, C++

Filed under
Development
  • Thread Synchronization in Linux and Windows Systems, Part 1

    In modern operating systems, each process has its own address space and one thread of control. However, in practice we often face situations requiring several concurrent tasks within a single process and with access to the same process components: structures, open file descriptors, etc.

  • Intro to Black – The Uncompromising Python Code Formatter

    There are several Python code checkers available. For example, a lot of developers enjoy using Pylint or Flake8 to check their code for errors. These tools use static code analysis to check your code for bugs or naming issues. Flake8 will also check your code to see if you are adhering to PEP8, Python’s style guide.

  • Report from the February 2019 ISO C++ meeting (Library)

    Back in February, I attended the WG21 C++ standards committee meeting in rainy Kona, Hawaii (yes, it rained most of the week). This report is so late that we’re now preparing for the next meeting, which will take place mid-July in Cologne.

    As usual, I spent the majority of my time in the Library Working Group (for LWG; for details on the various Working Groups and Study Groups see Standard C++: The Committee). The purpose of the LWG is to formalize the specification of the C++ Standard Library, i.e. the second “half” of the C++ standard (although in terms of page count it’s closer to three quarters than half). With a new C++20 standard on the horizon, and lots of new features that people want added to the standard library, the LWG has been very busy trying to process the backlog of new proposals forwarded by the Library Evolution Working Group (LEWG).

    One of the main tasks at the Kona meeting was to review the “Ranges Design Cleanup” proposal. The cleanup involves a number of fixes and improvements to the new Ranges library, addressing issues that came up during the review of the previous (much larger) proposal to add the Ranges library, which is one of the biggest additions to the C++20 library (most of the other significant additions to C++20 affect the core language, without much library impact). In fact, I’d say it’s one of the biggest additions to the C++ standard library since the first standard in 1998. The Ranges library work overhauls the parts of the standard that originated in the Standard Template Library (STL), i.e. iterators, algorithms, and containers, to re-specify them in terms of C++ Concepts. This has been a multi-year effort that has now landed in the C++20 working draft, following multiple proposals and several meetings of wording review by LWG.

  • Save and load Python data with JSON

    JSON stands for JavaScript Object Notation. This format is a popular method of storing data in key-value arrangements so it can be parsed easily later. Don’t let the name fool you, though: You can use JSON in Python—not just JavaScript—as an easy way to store data, and this article demonstrates how to get started.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspbian Buster: Hands-On

Filed under
Linux

In my previous two posts I looked at the Raspberry Pi 4 hardware and at the procedure for installing and booting the new Raspbian Buster Operating System on the Pi 4. With those basic steps out of the way, now it's time to look at both the hardware and software in more detail.

The first thing I want to mention is that when I wrote the previous post about Raspbian, I had not noticed that there is an updated version of Raspbian Buster (2019-07-10) available. This version was released sort of quietly (without the usual blog post announcing and explaining it), although there are release notes for it if you are interested. This release is extremely good news, because it fixes some of the biggest problems that I mentioned in my previous post...

Read more

Fedora Community Blog: Application service categories and community handoff

Filed under
Red Hat

The Community Platform Engineering (CPE) team recently wrote about our face-to-face meeting where we developed a team mission statement and developed a framework for making our workload more manageable. Having more focus will allow us to progress higher priority work for multiple stakeholders and move the needle on more initiatives in a more efficient manner than how we are working right now.

During the F2F we walked through the process of how to gracefully remove ourselves from applications that are not fitting our mission statement. The next couple of months will be a transition phase as we want to ensure continuity and cause minimum disruption to the community. To assist in that strategy, we analysed our applications and came up with four classifications to which they could belong.

Read more

Clonezilla live 2.6.2-15 Released, which includes Major Enhancements and Bug Fixes

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Clonezilla live 2.6.2-15 Released on 12-July-2019, which includes Major Enhancements and Bug Fixes.

Clonezilla is a partition and disk imaging/cloning program similar to True Image or Norton Ghost. It allows users to do system deployment, bare metal backup and recovery.

Read more

Graphics: Vulkan, AMDGPU and AMDVLK

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • A Vulkan Extension Is Being Worked On To Acquire Exclusive Control Of A Wayland Display

    Drew DeVault of Sway/WLROOTS fame has been dabbling with his first Vulkan extension as part of work with other upstream Wayland developers on DRM lease support and better supporting VR headsets under Wayland.

    Being worked on in-step with DRM lease protocol support for Wayland, Drew is also drafting a "VK_EXT_acquire_wl_display" extension for Vulkan. That new extension is akin to VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display for X11 but for working on Wayland. The existing VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extension allows a Vulkan application / game engine to take exclusive control of a display currently associated with an X11 screen. This goes along with the DRM lease support and was spearheaded by Red Hat, Valve, NVIDIA, and Intel as part of Steam VR support on Linux.

  • AMDGPU DC Gets A Number Of Fixes For Navi & Other Clean-Ups

    The past few weeks while AMD open-source developers were busy getting their Navi enablement code public and aligned for the Linux 5.3 merge window, the display core "DC" frequent code drops ceased. Every so often AMD developers volley their DC patches from their internal development trees to the public mailing list for queuing ahead of the next cycle. Now that Navi is out there and getting stabilized, they've issued a new set of DC patches and it's coming in heavy.

    Given that it's been a while during Navi review and upstreaming, the AMDGPU DC patches sent out on Monday are 87 patches that add nearly ten thousand lines of new code.

  • AMDVLK 2019.Q3.2 Released With Navi 10 Support

    Just over one week after the Radeon RX 5700/5700XT "Navi" graphics cards began shipping, the AMDVLK open-source AMD Radeon Vulkan Linux driver support is now available for these first RDNA offerings.

    AMDVLK is the official open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver and is based on the same sources as the Windows/Linux Radeon Software Vulkan driver. The open-source AMDVLK, however, uses their LLVM-based shader compiler rather than AMD's long-standing proprietary shader compiler. AMDVLK is an alternative to the Mesa RADV Vulkan driver maintained by the "community" (principally, Red Hat, Google, and Valve) that did see launch-day support last week for Navi.

Arduino from the Command Line: Break Free from the GUI with Git and Vim!

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The word "Arduino" often invokes a wide range of opinions and sometimes emotion. For many, it represents a very low bar to entry into the world of microcontrollers. This world before 2003 often required costly, obscure and closed-source development tools. Arduino has been a great equalizer, blowing the doors off the walled garden. Arduino now represents a huge ecosystem of hardware that speaks a (mostly) common language and eases transition from one hardware platform to another. Today, if you are a company that sells microcontrollers, it's in your best interest to get your dev boards working with Arduino. It offers a low-friction path to getting your products into lots of hands quickly.

It's also important to note that Arduino's simplicity does not inhibit digging deep into the microcontroller. Nothing stops you from directly twiddling registers and using advanced features. It does, however, decrease your portability between boards.

Read more

Also: First the E-Bike, Next the Flying Car

Games: Emberlight, Rings of Saturn, Defend The Keep, Path of Titans, Kind Words, Kingdoms of the Dump

Filed under
Gaming

ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors v.5.3 available

Filed under
Software

All the recent features of ONLYOFFICE online editors are now also available in the free open-source desktop suite, with several new features exclusive to the desktop app.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Firefox 69 Beta On Linux Bringing Better Performance

With the recent release of Mozilla Firefox 68 there are some nice WebRender performance improvements that Linux users can enjoy. But with Firefox 69 now in beta there is even better performance, including when enabling WebRender on Linux. Given the recent Firefox 68.0 release and Firefox 69.0 being promoted to beta, I ran some fresh browser benchmarks for checking out the current state of Mozilla's Linux performance from the Ubuntu desktop. The official Mozilla Firefox binaries for Linux x86_64 67.0.4, 68.0, and 69.0b3 were tested on the same system in a variety of browser benchmarks. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Btrfs Gets Cleaned Up & Code Refactoring For Linux 5.3

    David Sterba sent in the Btrfs file-system updates on Monday for the Linux 5.3 kernel. Btrfs for Linux 5.3 doesn't present any shiny new features but is mostly focused on bug fixes and low-level code improvements. One of the internal changes worth pointing out for Btrfs is changing its CRC32C usage so that it can be hardware-assisted on more architectures where native instructions or optimized code paths are available. More Btrfs code has also been positioned for more checksum algorithms moving forward.

  • g_array_binary_search in GLib 2.61.2

    The final API so far in this mini-series on new APIs in the GLib 2.62 series is g_array_binary_search(), put together by Emmanuel Fleury and based on code by Christian Hergert. It’s due to be released in 2.61.2 soon. But first, a reminder about GLib version numbering. Like the rest of GNOME’s official module set, GLib follows an odd/even versioning scheme, where every odd minor version number, like 2.61.x, is an unstable release building up to an even minor version number, like 2.62.x, which is stable. APIs may be added in unstable releases. They may be modified or even removed (if they haven’t been in a stable release yet). So all of the APIs I’ve blogged about recently still have a chance to be tweaked or dropped if people find problems with them. So if you see a problem or think that one of these APIs would be awkward to use in some way, please say, sooner rather than later! They need fixing before they’re in a stable release.

  • Rabimba: ARCore and Arkit: What is under the hood : Anchors and World Mapping (Part 1)

    Some of you know I have been recently experimenting a bit more with WebXR than a WebVR and when we talk about mobile Mixed Reality, ARkit and ARCore is something which plays a pivotal role to map and understand the environment inside our applications. I am planning to write a series of blog posts on how you can start developing WebXR applications now and play with them starting with the basics and then going on to using different features of it. But before that, I planned to pen down this series of how actually the "world mapping" works in arcore and arkit. So that we have a better understanding of the Mixed Reality capabilities of the devices we will be working with.

  • 10 Best Automated Backup Plugins for WordPress in 2019

    As an online business owner and/or site administrator it is important that you are always ahead of probable data damage by having a data contingency plan. On WordPress, this process has been simplified for all levels of users in the form of backup plugins that can enable you to automate full or partial backups which you can easily restore from later on. Today, we bring you a list of the 10 best plugins for backing up your WordPress site. They all feature a clean modern UI, in active development with millions of downloads, and most of them are 100% free!

today's howtos and software bits