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Thursday, 01 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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GTK 3.99.2

Filed under
Development
Red Hat
GNOME

The GTK 3.99.2 release continues the topics from 3.99.1: api cleanup, new and polished demos, better documentation. You can see the details here.

One small note on the topic of documentation is that we are relying on some unreleased gtk-doc features. Therefore, we now include gtk-doc as a subproject in the gtk release tarball. If you are a distributor, don’t be surprised that building GTK installs gtk-doc tools now.

The big news in this snapshot is our work on exposing the power of the new GL-based rendering stack a bit more.

[...]

This is not our first attempt to make a shadertoy lookalike. When we first looked at it, we thought that we would make a shader abstraction that applications could use. We put it to the side when it turned out that making it work across different renderers and backends would require us to write our own shader compiler—too much work.

But after our shadertoy success, we revisited the idea of shaders as first-class objects, with more modest goals: We use GLSL, and don’t attempt to make the shaders work with anything but the OpenGL renderer.

Read more

Also: GTK 3.99.2 Released As A Step Closer To GTK4 With Fancy GLSL Shader Capabilities

10 Best Free and Open Source Flat File Content Management Systems

Filed under
Software

A Content Management System (CMS) is software designed to simplify the publication of Web content. In particular, it enables content creators to submit content without requiring technical knowledge of HTML or the uploading of files. A CMS is most commonly used in creating an intranet or in establishing a presence on the Web.

This type of software that keeps track of every piece of content on a Web site. Content can be simple text, photos, music, video, documents, or just about anything you can think of.

Most CMS use databases to hold their content. This can make installation and maintenance confusing, complicated, and require some technical skill. Other problems can surface over time. For example, it can be difficult to modify, edit, or migrate content, although some CMS make things a little less complicated.

Read more

Also: Excellent System Utilities: CPU-X – system profiler tool

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The one-millionth commit: The search for the lucky Linux kernel contributor

    This week has been “a week of millions” for the Linux Foundation, with our announcement that over 1 million people have taken our free Introduction to Linux course. As part of the research for our recently published 2020 Linux Kernel History Report, the Kernel Project itself determined that it had surpassed one million code commits. Here is how we established the identity of this lucky Kernel Project contributor.

  • Meet the contributor of the 1-millionth commit: Ricardo Neri
  • Welcome to the September 2020 edition of Friends of GNOME Update!

    Several Foundation staff presented at GNOME Africa Onboard Virtual. Kristi Progri helped kick off the event with Foundation vice-president Regina Nkemchor Adejo. M de Blanc and Rosanna Yuen talked about the GNOME code of conduct. Melissa Wu reprised her session on What it’s Like to Be New to GNOME.

    Rosanna will also be presenting at All Things Open. On October 20 at 3:30pm ET, you can catch “GNOME Foundation Then and Now — 20 years of bringing free software to the desktop.”

  • Intentional Documentation

    I mentioned earlier that documenting data science work is significantly different than documenting engineering work. One of they key differences is that data scientists tend to do more once-and-done work than engineers. Data science is a race against irrelevance. The world is changing around us and we need to deliver insights before our findings go stale.

    It's impossible and inefficient to try to document all of this one-off work. Only a small portion of the resulting documentation would ever be used. Even worse, the useful documentation will be hidden in a sea of useless noise.

    Instead, data scientists should focus on keeping good work records, contextualizing their analyses, and preparing themselves to backfill documentation later.

  • Expanded extension support in Firefox for Android Nightly

    A few weeks ago, we mentioned that we were working on increasing extension support in the Firefox for Android Nightly pre-release channel. Starting September 30, you will be able to install any extension listed on addons.mozilla.org (AMO) in Nightly.

    This override was created for extension developers and advanced users who are interested in testing for compatibility, so it’s not easily accessible. Installing untested extensions can lead to unexpected outcomes; please be judicious about the extensions you install. Also, since most developers haven’t been able to test and optimize their extensions for the new Android experience, please be kind if something doesn’t work the way it should. We will remove negative user reviews about extension performance in Nightly.

    Currently, Nightly uses the Collections feature on AMO to install extensions. You will need to create a collection on AMO and change an advanced setting in Nightly in order to install general extensions.

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, firefox, libvirt, and podman), Debian (firefox-esr and nss), Gentoo (bitcoind, chromium, cifs-utils, gpsd, libuv, and xen), Mageia (firefox, gnutls, mediawiki, samba, and Thunderbird), openSUSE (brotli and cifs-utils), Red Hat (audiofile, bluez, cloud-init, cpio, cups, curl, dbus, dnsmasq, e2fsprogs, evince and poppler, exiv2, expat, firefox, fontforge, freeradius, freerdp, glib2 and ibus, glibc, httpd, hunspell, ipa, kernel, kernel-rt, libcroco, libexif, libmspack, libpng, librabbitmq, libsndfile, libsrtp, libssh2, libtiff, libvirt, libvpx, libwmf, libxml2, libxslt, mariadb, mod_auth_openidc, NetworkManager, nss and nspr, okular, OpenEXR, openldap, openwsman, pcp, python, python-pillow, python3, qemu-kvm, qemu-kvm-ma, qt5-qtbase, samba, SDL, spamassassin, squid, subversion, systemd, tigervnc, tomcat, unoconv, and webkitgtk4), SUSE (bcm43xx-firmware, nodejs8, pdns, python-pip, and xen), and Ubuntu (libapreq2, netqmail, samba, and tomcat6).

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Python Meeting Düsseldorf - 2020-09-30

    The following text is in German, since we're announcing a regional user group meeting in Düsseldorf, Germany.

  • Making Concurrent HTTP requests with Python AsyncIO

    Python 3.4 added the asyncio module to the standard library. Asyncio allows us to run IO-bound tasks asynchronously to increase the performance of our program. Common IO-bound tasks include calls to a database, reading and writing files to disk, and sending and receiving HTTP requests. A Django web application is a common example of an IO-bound application.

    We’ll demonstrate the usage of concurrent HTTP requests by fetching prices for stock tickers. The only third party package we’ll use is httpx. Httpx is very similar to the popular requests package, but httpx supports asyncio.

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Changes Coming To Pip In October 2020

    Changes Coming To Pip In October 2020: People who deal with Python: Changes are coming to pip, Python's package installation tool, in October 2020. Please share this migration guide and our video with your circles.

    [...]

    I'm working on improving the Python packaging toolchain, foundational work that will (in the long run) make the whole Python experience way less confusing. In the short term this may mess with some people's workflows, so we want lots of people to hear about it now.

  • Production ready Django App in Amazon Lightsail - Weblog

    This article is based in this documentation page and this video where Mike Coleman takes us how to deploy a Django application on Amazon Lightsail. It was also considered two articles from Bitnami (Getting started with Django, and Deploy a Django project).

  • Python's map(): Processing Iterables Without a Loop

    Python’s map() is a built-in function that allows you to process and transform all the items in an iterable without using an explicit for loop, a technique commonly known as mapping. map() is useful when you need to apply a transformation function to each item in an iterable and transform them into a new iterable. map() is one of the tools that support a functional programming style in Python.

  • Pandas Count Occurrences in Column – i.e. Unique Values

    In this Pandas tutorial, you are going to learn how to count occurrences in a column. There are occasions in data science when you need to know how many times a given value occurs. This can happen when you, for example, have a limited set of possible values that you want to compare. Another example can be if you want to count the number of duplicate values in a column. Furthermore, we may want to count the number of observations there is in a factor or we need to know how many men or women there are in the data set, for example.

  • Cleaning Text Data With Python

    Machine Learning is super powerful if your data is numeric. What do you do, however, if you want to mine text data to discover hidden insights or to predict the sentiment of the text. What, for example, if you wanted to identify a post on a social media site as cyber bullying.

    The first concept to be aware of is a Bag of Words. When training a model or classifier to identify documents of different types a bag of words approach is a commonly used, but basic, method to help determine a document's class. A bag of words is a representation of text as a set of independent words with no relationship to each other. It is called a “bag” of words, because any information about the order or structure of words in the document is discarded.

  • Quit Virtualenv and use Docker

    Don't get me wrong, I really like virtualenv and it's pretty useful in some scenarios. But sometimes you have to deal with OS dependencies and that forces you to install new packages and it can get a bit messy in some scenarios.

Purism/Librem, Librem Mini, and Librem 5 Updates

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Desktop and Phone Convergence

    The Librem 5 is more than a phone, it’s a full desktop computer in your pocket designed to be just as mobile as you are.

  • Video Editing with KDenLive and the Librem Mini part 2: Keyframe Animations

    Last week we introduced you to a premier workflow for film editors and videographers using free software and freedom-respecting hardware – the Librem Mini and a video editing suite called KDenLive. We also dived into the features of KDenLive and how to achieve certain tasks like using chroma key to remove backgrounds and place objects in new environments. In this article we are going to focus on another important video creation task: keyframe animations.

    In the video below, we will demonstrate how we achieved a visual in a promo video displaying the workstation power of the Librem Mini, during a transition from a KDenLive screen recording and video footage of a colorful miniature train ride for children on display. Using an image of the minature train captured in a screenshot of the very first frame in the video, I was able to animate the train over the footage of the prior scene to create a captivating custom transition.

  • Software Development Progress July and August 2020

    This is another incarnation of the software development progress for the Librem 5. This time for July and August 2020 (weeks 27-35).

    Some items are covered in more detail in separate blog posts at https://puri.sm/news. The idea of this summary is so you can have a closer look at the coding and design side of things. It also shows how much we’re standing on the shoulders of giants reusing existing software and how contributions are flowing back and forth between upstream and downstream projects. This quickly gets interesting since we’re upstream for some projects (e.g. calls, phosh, chatty) and downstream for others (e.g Debian, Linux kernel, GNOME). So these reports are usually rather link heavy pointing to individual merge requests on https://source.puri.sm/ or to the upstream side (like e.g. GNOME’s gitlab).

    New software releases have an extra section so if you’re using phosh, squeekbord, phoc, chatty, etc. outside of PureOS this section might be worth a quick look.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

GNU/Linux in Hardware, Arduino for Amazon Surveillance

  • Jetson Nano based system can be powered over Ethernet

    Aaeon’s compact, $475 “Boxer-8222AI” embedded box runs Linux on a Jetson Nano along with 4x USB 3.1 Gen2, HDMI 2.0, RS-232, M.2, mini-PCIe, 40-pin GPIO, and 2x GbE ports, one with PoE/PD.

    In April, Aaeon unveiled two compact systems: the Nvidia Jetson Xavier NX-based Boxer-8251AI and similar Jetson Nano based Boxer-8221AI. At the time, the company mentioned an upcoming Boxer-8222AI, but without offering details. It has now launched the system, which runs the Ubuntu 18.04 based ACLinux 4.9 on the Jetson Nano.

  •  

  • Run the Linux command line on your iPad

    Run a virtualized system using Alpine Linux with iSH, which is open source, but must be installed using Apple's proprietary TestFlight app

  • Light[s]well is a voice-controlled custom lighting installation

    Designed by Brian Harms of NSTRMNT, Light[s]well is a beautifully crafted 4’x8′ light installation for a triple-height living room that’s voice-responsive thanks to the Arduino Alexa skill.

    Light[s]well is constructed out of 80/20 extrusions and fasteners, with individually addressable LED strips embedded in the channels of the structure. 74 sheets of laser-cut cardstock make up the undulating light-diffusing wave pattern.

    According to Harms, 30 LEDs per meter strips were used to give each gap in the cardstock two LEDs per structural metal beam, for a total of six LEDs per gap. The LEDs are controlled by a MKR1000 (via a logic level shifter) along with the Arduino IoT Cloud.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Runtimes update delivers new features for Open Hybrid Cloud

    It’s that time again: the time we announce the latest updates and new features in Red Hat Runtimes. The latest release, now available, builds on the work we have done over the past year to create cloud-native, modern applications, with a focus on our work in advancing Java.

    Red Hat Runtimes is a part of the Red Hat Application Services portfolio and is a set of products, tools and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications that offers lightweight runtimes and frameworks for highly-distributed cloud architectures, such as microservices or serverless applications. We make updates on a regular basis to meet changing customer demands while providing them with the technology necessary to make business-critical decisions while remaining innovative, competitive and flexible. Check out the rest of the post to learn more about the most recent updates to Red Hat Runtimes.

  • Red Hat adopts ROLIE protocol for automated exchange of security compliance assets

    This is a primer on the implementation of the ROLIE protocol. The purpose of this report is to recommend automated processes for information exchange of various security compliance and vulnerability management assets using the ROLIE protocol and its open source implementation, Golie.

    [...]

    The ROLIE standard helps to discover and consume security content in a standard and automated way. A ROLIE implementation like the golie tool can be used by security vendors or regular users to consume vendor provided CVE content. It can be used as a way to submit checklists to benchmark validation organizations, or it can be used to host subscription-model services around security content.

    Have ideas on where else the ROLIE standard or the golie tool can be used or enhanced? Want to get involved in the project? Please provide your input and ideas at the GitHub project. It is very important to note that the vision of the project and tooling is to be multi-platform and multi-vendor. Contributions in any way are always and very welcomed!

    Note: The ROLIE standard is still in its early stages of development, and the format may change should the standard change.

  • Looking back to the future: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as the OS trendsetter

    It’s hard to believe that we introduced Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (RHEL 7) into the market more than six years ago. RHEL 7 balanced the enterprise need for stability and compatibility with that of tangible innovation. At general availability, we believe that we dispelled the myth that the operating system is "just a commodity" and redefined the Linux operating system.

  • Discover how to build intelligent, self-correcting supply chains

    The IBM Sterling suite offers solutions for supply chain and B2B collaboration. For complete product documentation, including information on how to extend the solutions, check out the following product Knowledge Centers.

  • JupyterLab, Elyra, and quantum at JupyterCon 2020

    For this year’s JupyterCon, which is held online October 5-17, we are excited to have the opportunity to share our experience with the Jupyter ecosystem and showcase some of the contributions IBM has made during the past year.

  • Fedora 32 : Can be better? part 014.

    The GTK documentation for C # is not very up to date, I tried to use a button to change a label and I failed first time. The Fedora team could improve this to develop the development side. Here's what I've managed to do so far with GTK.

  • Marcin 'hrw' Juszkiewicz: Upgraded to Fedora 33

    I am running Fedora on my desktop since started working for Red Hat. Kind of ‘eat your own dogfood’ style despite fact that I am not active in Fedora development for some time.

    Fedora 33 reached Beta status so it was time to upgrade.

  • RPM 4.16.0 Release Notes
  • RPM 4.16.0 released

    Version 4.16.0 of the RPM package manager has been released.

  • AI software stack inspection with Thoth and TensorFlow

    Project Thoth develops open source tools that enhance the day-to-day life of developers and data scientists. Thoth uses machine-generated knowledge to boost the performance, security, and quality of your applications using artificial intelligence (AI) through reinforcement learning (RL). This machine-learning approach is implemented in Thoth adviser (if you want to know more, click here) and it is used by Thoth integrations to provide the software stack based on user inputs.

    In this article, I introduce a case study—a recent inspection of a runtime issue when importing TensorFlow 2.1.0—to demonstrate the human-machine interaction between the Thoth team and Thoth components. By following the case study from start to finish, you will learn how Thoth gathers and analyzes some of the data to provide advice to its users, including bots such as Kebechet, AI-backed continuous integration pipelines, and developers using GitHub apps.

  • Fedora 33 Beta

    Today we are looking at Fedora 33 Beta. It comes fully packed with Gnome 3.38, Linux Kernel 5.68, and uses about 1.3-1.6GB ram when idling. It comes with Wayland and Btrfs File Manager by default and is a great Beta release. As seen in the video, it is not perfect yet, but I am sure that it will be fixed! Enjoy!

  • Fedora 33 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Fedora 33 Beta. Enjoy!

Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, FLOSS Weekly, Full Circle Weekly, LINUX Unplugged, mintCast and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Destination Linux 193: Lenovo Giving Linux Some Love!

    This week the DL Triforce discuss the great news of more Linux hardware from Lenovo but is there a twist to this discussion? Microsoft is bringing Edge to Linux! Is this the death of Firefox as we know it? In the Gaming section, Amazon has decided to join the Cloud Gaming Space. Is this a good move for Amazon or is Cloud Gaming ahead of its time? Later in the show we’ll give you our popular tips/tricks and software picks. Plus so much more, coming up right now on Destination Linux.

  • FLOSS Weekly 598: DemocracyLab - Tech For Good

    DemocracyLab connects tech for good projects with skilled volunteers. This non-profit sets out to empower people who use technology to advance the common good. Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett talk with Mark Frischmuth, the founder and Executive Director of DemocracyLab. They discuss how DemocracyLab is open to not just software developers but also designers, marketers, and financial analysts, which allows projects to get made and adapted by users. The talk about the importance of technologists stepping up and using their cognitive surplus to create a better world.

  • Full Circle Weekly News #183
  • Your New Tools | LINUX Unplugged 373

    We embrace new tools to upgrade your backup game, securely move files around the network, and debunk the idea that Windows will ever be based on Linux.

  • mintCast 344.5 – “Working” from Home

    In our Innards section, we go over the working from home slash home-office setups we have.

  • Will Vifm Be My New Terminal File Manager? Maybe!

    I've been using Lf for quite a while now but I've always had Vifm just out of sight and I thought I should finally give it a shot, now it's obviously not perfect and there are some things to get used to compared to switching from ranger to lf but I think ultimately this terminal file manager deserves the praise that it gets.

  • Make BTRFS The Default Filesystem On EVERY Linux Distro

    The Fedora 33 Beta is out, and the BTRFS filesystem is the new default. Schykle thinks it's the way forward for ALL Linux distributions.

Debian: UBports, plocate, and developers' reports

Filed under
Debian
  • Mike Gabriel: UBports: Packaging of Lomiri Operating Environment for Debian (part 03)

    Before and during FOSDEM 2020, I agreed with the people (developers, supporters, managers) of the UBports Foundation to package the Unity8 Operating Environment for Debian. Since 27th Feb 2020, Unity8 has now become Lomiri.

  • Steinar H. Gunderson: plocate improvements

    Since announcing plocate, a number of major and minor improvements have happened, and despite its prototype status, I've basically stopped using mlocate entirely now.

    First of all, the database building now uses 90% less RAM, so if you had issues with plocate-build OOM-ing before, you're unlikely to see that happening anymore.

    Second, while plocate was always lightning-fast on SSDs or with everything in cache, that isn't always the situation for everyone. It's so annoying having a tool usually be instant, and then suddenly have a 300 ms hiccup just because you searched for something rare. To get that case right, real work had to be done; I couldn't just mmap up the index anymore and search randomly around in it.

  • Presentation tools

    I keep forgetting how to make presentations. I had a list of tools in a wiki from a previous job, but that's now private and I don't see why I shouldn't share this (even if for myself!).

    So here it is. What's your favorite presentation tool?

  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in September 2020

    This month I've worked 18 hours on Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and 12 hours on its sister Extended LTS project.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in September 2020

    Here’s my (twelfth) monthly update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world.

4MLinux 35.0 BETA released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux 35.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages.

Read more

Graphics: WayVNC, MoltenVK, Mir, Navi and Mali

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • wayvnc 0.3.1
    New features since v0.2.0:
    
     * Copy & paste, thanks to Scott Moreau.
     * wayvnc now has a man page.
     * wayvnc now exits if authentication is enabled but fails.
    
    Git commit history since v0.2.0:
    
    Alexander Graul (1):
          Add openSUSE Tumbleweed installation instruction
    
    Andri Yngvason (15):
          buffer: Fix buffer attribute comparison
          README: Use "yay" in archlinux installation instructions
          Exit if enabling auth fails
          Clean up config on exit
          Clean up aml on nvnc init failure
          data-control: Make offer handling asynchronous
          data-control: Don't free data-control-manager twice
          data-control: Clean up whole receive context in aml_free_fn
          data-control: Destroy data device on exit
          Don't init data_control if it's not supported by compositor
          Write a man page
          Generate and install a man page
          man-page: Fix wording
          FAQ: Remove outdated Q
          Release v3.0.0
          Fix man page path
    
    Jan Beich (1):
          shm: guard fallback on FreeBSD < 13 as well
    
    Jony (1):
          add Void Linux install command to README.md
    
    Scott Moreau (1):
          Add basic clipboard support
    
  • WayVNC 0.3 Released - The Wayland VNC Server Now Supports Copy & Paste

    WayVNC 0.3 released today as the Wayland VNC server built atop the WLROOTS library.

    The headline feature of WayVNC is... clipboard support! Yep, this popular Wayland VNC server can finally support copy and paste functionality. This clipboard support landed just last week and allows copy/paste of text to/from the host clipboard. On the Wayland side this clipboard support is making use of the wlr-data-control-unstable-v1 protocol. This WayVNC clipboard support was written by longtime Wayland contributor Scott Moreau.

  • MoltenVK 1.1 Update Brings Big Improvements For Vulkan On macOS

    MoltenVK 1.1 is out as a big update for this graphics translation layer for getting the Vulkan API running on macOS and iOS devices by translating calls to Apple's Metal API.

    MoltenVK 1.1 is out with Vulkan 1.1 support by exposing all core Vulkan 1.1 extensions and other relevant changes. There are also a number of other new Vulkan extensions supported by this release like KHR_multiview, KHR_external_semaphore, KHR_external_fence, and others.

  • Mir 2.1 Released With Some New Protocol Support, Many Fixes

    Mir 2.1 has been released as Canonical's project around offering a set of libraries for constructing Wayland shells particularly with Snap confinement support and other Ubuntu-focused features.

    With the Mir 2.1 release comes a --show-splash command line option, reduced locking within the KeyRepeatDispatcher code, support for the zwp_linux_dmabuf_unstable_v1 protocol within the GBM-KMS back-end, and support for the Wayland zwlr_layer_shell_v1 v3 and wlr_foreign_toplevel_management_unstable_v1 protocols. There are also X11 handling improvements too.

  • Linux 5.9 Gets More Fixes For AMD RDNA2 GPUs, Promotes Navi 12

    A batch of fixes to the AMDGPU kernel graphics driver were sent in today for Linux 5.9. While AMDGPU fixes this late in the kernel cycle tend to not be too notable, this time around there are some prominent items worth covering.

    When it comes to the next-generation "Sienna Cichlid" and "Navy Flounder" Navi 2x graphics (RDNA2) support, there are continued updates in making the support in good shape for Linux 5.9 stable. This work includes additional Sienna Cichlid PCI IDs being added, fixing for building DCN 3.0 code with older versions of GCC, temporarily disabling GFXOFF capabilities for Navy Flounder until issues are resolved, and the kernel side bits for AV1 decode with these GPUs.

  • Mali G72 Now Supported By Open-Source Panfrost Gallium3D Driver

    The open-source Panfrost graphics driver, which is now backed/supported by Arm after starting as a reverse-engineering effort, has picked up support for the Mali G72 GPU.

    Adding to the many Panfrost open-source driver accomplishments this year is now support for the G72 as their latest support addition. The Mali G72 has been around since late 2017 and is making use of the second-generation Bifrost architecture. The Mali G72 is used by the likes of the Kirin 970, Samsung Exynos 9 9810, Exynos 7 9610, and Helio P60/P70 SoCs.

Intel: DG1, Media Driver 2020.3 and Key Locker Support

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Sends Out Latest DG1 Linux Patches But Won't Hit Until At Least The 5.11 Kernel

    The sixth spin of Intel DG1 discrete graphics card patches have now been sent out for review, amounting to just about 700 lines of new driver code due to building off the existing DG1 work and more broadly the Gen12/Xe support that's been refined in mainline for months. With these patches it would appear the Intel DG1 is then in good shape under Linux but due to the timing is unlikely to be mainlined until a stable kernel release in early 2021.

    Intel's Gen12 / Xe Graphics as found in Tiger Lake appears to be in good shape with the latest mainline code (soon to be tested at Phoronix) but for the DG1 discrete graphics card there have been patches lingering.

  • Intel Media Driver 2020.3 Released With Gen12 AV1 Decode, Other Improvements

    Just in time for the end of the quarter Intel's open-source multimedia team has released the Media Driver 2020.3 package for the Intel graphics accelerated media encode/decode component on Linux platforms.

    The Intel Media Decode Driver 2020.3 is notable in that it rounds out the Gen12/Xe support. This support is not only for the Tiger Lake support now beginning to appear in shipping notebooks but also for DG1 and upcoming Rocket Lake and SG1 solutions as well.

  • Intel Key Locker Support Added To LLVM - Confirms Presence With Tiger Lake

    Last week on the GNU toolchain side was initial work on supporting Intel Key Locker while this week Key Locker support has come to LLVM.

    Intel Key Locker is a means of encrypting/decrypting data with an AES key without having access to the raw key. Key Locker relies on converting AES keys into handles that are then used in place of the actual key, until revoked by the system. The goal with this feature is for preventing any rogue attackers from obtaining the actual AES keys on the system.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Benchmarking Firefox 83 Nightly With "Warp" Against Google Chrome On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Following last week's news of Firefox Nightly flipping on their new JIT "Warp" update I was eager to run fresh benchmarks of the current Firefox releases compared to Google Chrome under Ubuntu Linux.

Warp was enabled last week for Firefox 83 nightly builds with this "Warp" just-in-time JavaScript compiler update having various improvements in an effort to provide greater responsiveness and faster page load speeds. Numbers cited by Mozilla engineers on their JavaScript/SpiderMonkey team were frequently in the 5~15% range. Even instances like Google Docs load times on Windows was around 20% faster with Warp.

This round of benchmarking was done with Firefox 81, Firefox 82 Beta 3, and Firefox 83 Alpha 1 nightly as of last week after Warp landed. A secondary run of Firefox 83 nightly was also done with WebRender force enabled on Linux. Plus Google Chrome 85 was also tested as the latest stable release.

Read more

Linux-driven COM duo tap i.MX8M Plus

Filed under
Linux

TechNexion’s rugged “EDM-G-IMX8M-PLUS” and “AXON-E-IMX8M-PLUS” modules run Linux on NXP’s 2.3 TOPS i.MX8M Plus with up to 8GB LPDDR4, 16GB eMMC, WiFi/BT, and starter kits. There are also new i.MX8M Mini and Nano EDM modules.

TechNexion has posted product pages for two compute modules that feature NXP’s i.MX8M Plus. The EDM-G-IMX8M-PLUS is essentially the same as the wireless enabled Wandboard IMX8M-Plus-4G module option on the sandwich-style Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC announced in August. However, it offers up to 8GB LPDDR4 instead of 4GB. The AXON-E-IMX8M-PLUS provides essentially the same capabilities but in TechNexion’s more rugged, 58 x 37mm AXON form-factor, which was used on the i.MX8M Mini-based AXON-IMX8M-Mini module.

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Red Hat Satellite 6.7.4 has been released

Filed under
Red Hat

We are pleased to announce that Red Hat Satellite 6.7. is generally available as of September 30, 2020.

Red Hat Satellite is part of the Red Hat Smart Management subscription that makes it easier for enterprises to manage patching, provisioning, and subscription management of Red Hat Enterprise Linux infrastructure.

Read more

Tails 4.11 Anonymous OS Released with Tor Browser 10, Extended Persistent Storage

Filed under
Linux

The biggest news in Tails 4.11 is the fact that it comes with the latest Tor Browser 10 anonymous web browser preinstalled, which is based on the newest Mozilla Firefox 78.3 ESR (Extended Support Release) series and includes Tor 0.4.4.5, Tor Launcher 0.2.25, and NoScript 11.0.44.

On top of that, Tails 4.11 updates the Mozilla Thunderbird email client to version 68.12 and extends the Persistent Storage feature to also save the keyboard, language, and other settings from the Welcome Screen. Users will be able to restore these settings when they reinstall Tails, but only after upgrading to version 4.11.

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Nvidia Graphics News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD FreeSync on a Nvidia GPU?

    It may be a familiar story for a lot of office workers no matter where you live in 2020. Out of the blue, COVID19 showed up, and suddenly working remotely is the new norm – your company either allowing it or encouraging it. I am also in this situation, stuck for about 6 months at home, more or less. And with all changes, there’s positive and negative aspects. In my case, I have lost a comfortable setup in my workplace (multiple monitors, high resolution).

    In order to make the best of working from home, I have purchased an ultra-wide monitor, which happens to be FreeSync compatible as well. But would it actually work on Linux? Especially on a non-AMD GPU configuration?

  • NVIDIA Sends Out Latest Linux Kernel Patches For 1GB THP To Help Boost Performance

    NVIDIA software engineer Zi Yan sent out on Monday his latest "1GB PUD THP" patches in aiming to boost application performance on Linux for software making use of large amounts of RAM.

    This 1GB transparent hugepage support for Linux x86_64 is designed to reduce translation overhead and allow for greater application performance for software with large memory footprints without needing any application changes. NVIDIA's motivation for this work is on the performance front with aiming to boost virtual memory performance via gigantic TLB entries without needing additional changes as imposed by HUGETLBFS pages. The PUD THP support would be disabled by default but can be toggled via sysfs under /sys/kernel/mm/transparent_hugepage/.

  • NVIDIA Vulkan Beta Driver Moves To 455 Series For Linux

    NVIDIA's Linux Vulkan beta driver build has moved from the 450 series that it's been on for a while to the current 455 branch.

    Earlier this month NVIDIA shipped the 455.23.04 Linux beta driver for RTX 30 series support being most notable for the R455 series. But there are also various other underlying improvements too in the jump from 450 to 455 like a new VkMemoryType that will help out some games, numerous fixes, support for the NGX Updater, and VDPAU additions.

  • NVIDIA adds Ampere support to their Vulkan Beta Driver with a new release

    NVIDIA have pushed out a fresh update to their developer-focused Vulkan Beta Driver series, here's the highlights and what's changed.

    For starters it's now been rebased on top of their mainline 455 driver branch, which brings with it Ampere 30xx series support. So for anyone truly needing this series for all the brand-new Vulkan extensions and other Beta features, you should be good to go.

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More in Tux Machines

Python Programming

  • Python Meeting Düsseldorf - 2020-09-30

    The following text is in German, since we're announcing a regional user group meeting in Düsseldorf, Germany.

  • Making Concurrent HTTP requests with Python AsyncIO

    Python 3.4 added the asyncio module to the standard library. Asyncio allows us to run IO-bound tasks asynchronously to increase the performance of our program. Common IO-bound tasks include calls to a database, reading and writing files to disk, and sending and receiving HTTP requests. A Django web application is a common example of an IO-bound application. We’ll demonstrate the usage of concurrent HTTP requests by fetching prices for stock tickers. The only third party package we’ll use is httpx. Httpx is very similar to the popular requests package, but httpx supports asyncio.

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Changes Coming To Pip In October 2020

    Changes Coming To Pip In October 2020: People who deal with Python: Changes are coming to pip, Python's package installation tool, in October 2020. Please share this migration guide and our video with your circles. [...] I'm working on improving the Python packaging toolchain, foundational work that will (in the long run) make the whole Python experience way less confusing. In the short term this may mess with some people's workflows, so we want lots of people to hear about it now.

  • Production ready Django App in Amazon Lightsail - Weblog

    This article is based in this documentation page and this video where Mike Coleman takes us how to deploy a Django application on Amazon Lightsail. It was also considered two articles from Bitnami (Getting started with Django, and Deploy a Django project).

  • Python's map(): Processing Iterables Without a Loop

    Python’s map() is a built-in function that allows you to process and transform all the items in an iterable without using an explicit for loop, a technique commonly known as mapping. map() is useful when you need to apply a transformation function to each item in an iterable and transform them into a new iterable. map() is one of the tools that support a functional programming style in Python.

  • Pandas Count Occurrences in Column – i.e. Unique Values

    In this Pandas tutorial, you are going to learn how to count occurrences in a column. There are occasions in data science when you need to know how many times a given value occurs. This can happen when you, for example, have a limited set of possible values that you want to compare. Another example can be if you want to count the number of duplicate values in a column. Furthermore, we may want to count the number of observations there is in a factor or we need to know how many men or women there are in the data set, for example.

  • Cleaning Text Data With Python

    Machine Learning is super powerful if your data is numeric. What do you do, however, if you want to mine text data to discover hidden insights or to predict the sentiment of the text. What, for example, if you wanted to identify a post on a social media site as cyber bullying. The first concept to be aware of is a Bag of Words. When training a model or classifier to identify documents of different types a bag of words approach is a commonly used, but basic, method to help determine a document's class. A bag of words is a representation of text as a set of independent words with no relationship to each other. It is called a “bag” of words, because any information about the order or structure of words in the document is discarded.

  • Quit Virtualenv and use Docker

    Don't get me wrong, I really like virtualenv and it's pretty useful in some scenarios. But sometimes you have to deal with OS dependencies and that forces you to install new packages and it can get a bit messy in some scenarios.

Purism/Librem, Librem Mini, and Librem 5 Updates

  • Desktop and Phone Convergence

    The Librem 5 is more than a phone, it’s a full desktop computer in your pocket designed to be just as mobile as you are.

  • Video Editing with KDenLive and the Librem Mini part 2: Keyframe Animations

    Last week we introduced you to a premier workflow for film editors and videographers using free software and freedom-respecting hardware – the Librem Mini and a video editing suite called KDenLive. We also dived into the features of KDenLive and how to achieve certain tasks like using chroma key to remove backgrounds and place objects in new environments. In this article we are going to focus on another important video creation task: keyframe animations. In the video below, we will demonstrate how we achieved a visual in a promo video displaying the workstation power of the Librem Mini, during a transition from a KDenLive screen recording and video footage of a colorful miniature train ride for children on display. Using an image of the minature train captured in a screenshot of the very first frame in the video, I was able to animate the train over the footage of the prior scene to create a captivating custom transition.

  • Software Development Progress July and August 2020

    This is another incarnation of the software development progress for the Librem 5. This time for July and August 2020 (weeks 27-35). Some items are covered in more detail in separate blog posts at https://puri.sm/news. The idea of this summary is so you can have a closer look at the coding and design side of things. It also shows how much we’re standing on the shoulders of giants reusing existing software and how contributions are flowing back and forth between upstream and downstream projects. This quickly gets interesting since we’re upstream for some projects (e.g. calls, phosh, chatty) and downstream for others (e.g Debian, Linux kernel, GNOME). So these reports are usually rather link heavy pointing to individual merge requests on https://source.puri.sm/ or to the upstream side (like e.g. GNOME’s gitlab). New software releases have an extra section so if you’re using phosh, squeekbord, phoc, chatty, etc. outside of PureOS this section might be worth a quick look.

today's howtos

GNU/Linux in Hardware, Arduino for Amazon Surveillance

  • Jetson Nano based system can be powered over Ethernet

    Aaeon’s compact, $475 “Boxer-8222AI” embedded box runs Linux on a Jetson Nano along with 4x USB 3.1 Gen2, HDMI 2.0, RS-232, M.2, mini-PCIe, 40-pin GPIO, and 2x GbE ports, one with PoE/PD. In April, Aaeon unveiled two compact systems: the Nvidia Jetson Xavier NX-based Boxer-8251AI and similar Jetson Nano based Boxer-8221AI. At the time, the company mentioned an upcoming Boxer-8222AI, but without offering details. It has now launched the system, which runs the Ubuntu 18.04 based ACLinux 4.9 on the Jetson Nano.

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  • Run the Linux command line on your iPad

    Run a virtualized system using Alpine Linux with iSH, which is open source, but must be installed using Apple's proprietary TestFlight app

  • Light[s]well is a voice-controlled custom lighting installation

    Designed by Brian Harms of NSTRMNT, Light[s]well is a beautifully crafted 4’x8′ light installation for a triple-height living room that’s voice-responsive thanks to the Arduino Alexa skill. Light[s]well is constructed out of 80/20 extrusions and fasteners, with individually addressable LED strips embedded in the channels of the structure. 74 sheets of laser-cut cardstock make up the undulating light-diffusing wave pattern. According to Harms, 30 LEDs per meter strips were used to give each gap in the cardstock two LEDs per structural metal beam, for a total of six LEDs per gap. The LEDs are controlled by a MKR1000 (via a logic level shifter) along with the Arduino IoT Cloud.