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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 28 Mar 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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stable Linux kernel 2.6.16.16 released

Filed under
Linux

We (the -stable team) are announcing the release of the 2.6.16.16 kernel. 2 files changed, 13 insertions(+), 10 deletions(-)

More Here and Here.

Office ODF Support: Bad for Business!?

You've got to love Microsoft's sloppy way of opposing Linux and open-source some days. In Microsoft's latest FUD move has accused the Massachusetts Information and Technology Division of having "a biased, open source-only preference policy."

Debian Sarge (3.1) with Ruby on Rails and Apache 2 with FastCGI

Filed under
HowTos

This howto will step you through installing Debian (Sarge) with Ruby on Rails and Apache 2 with FastCGI managed with ISPConfig.

Novell’s "Newest" Linux Desktop Move

Filed under
SUSE

The company's lack of a coherent Linux strategy is hurting its products -- and the community. If they would select one strategy and pledge to stick to it without further changes in course...

Linux Antivirus and Firewall Beta from Panda

Filed under
Software

Panda Software released a new public beta today for DesktopSecure, their antivirus and firewall program for Linux. It's available as a free download from their Web site. No, there isn't any huge new influx of Linux malware to be addressed: CTO Patrick Hinojosa says it's meant more to help Linux users be good neighbors.

The Penguin's Practical Network Troubleshooting Guide

Filed under
HowTos

Linux has everything you need to do any kind of networking, plus it has eleventy-eight hundred different software utilities for network monitoring and troubleshooting. Last week we used ping and tcptraceroute to pinpoint connectivity problems, and nmap to spy on users. Oh yeah, and to map entire subnets with a single command. Today we'll look at ways, when your users crab about "the network is slow", to determine if it's network or server troubles.

Simply Mepis Beta 2

Filed under
Linux

SIMPLY MEPIS is offering some cutting edge programs to go with a very stable distribution. I have had beta 2 running since it was released and have yet to have a problem.

Computer stability explained: why your computer crashes

Filed under
Misc

Does your computer crash? Do you want to know why? Here’s a guide which will help you understand why this happens, and (hopefully) lead you on to a better computing experience.

Optimizing MySQL and Apache for Low Memory Usage, Part 1

Filed under
HowTos

MySQL and Apache can consume quite a bit of memory, if you’re not careful. This post discusses how to reduce the amount of memory they use without killing performance.

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Gosling: Java source code already available

Filed under
OSS

Anyone looking for Sun Microsystems to relinquish control of Java to the open source community or to join the Eclipse Foundation is likely to be disappointed, based on Java guru James Gosling's perspectives on these issues.

Stability in FreeBSD 6.1

Filed under
BSD

FreeBSD developers continue to improve the FreeBSD 6.X operating system branch with the release of version 6.1 this week. The new release boasts a few new features, some performance enhancements and lots of bug fixes, which will improve the overall stability of the open source operating system.

Enterprise Open Source Editorial — Coexistence

Filed under
OSS

While I think it's important to see Linux gain adoption as well as other Open Source technologies, you may be surprised that I would be saddened to see Linux totally replace Unix and Windows.

Linux System Administration: Growth in the Enterprise

Filed under
Linux

Trout Creek, Montana hardly seems like a place one would expect to find a center of Linux learning. Please do not tell Mike Weber of SpiderTools that. He spent the last six years developing one of the more robust training facilities in the US.

Routing mail messages to your mailserver efficiently

Filed under
HowTos

If you control satellite systems which need to relay their mail through a centralized host for sending then you have several choices. Perhaps the simplest software to use is the nullmailer program.

Vim tips: Using viewports

Filed under
HowTos

A lot of folks use Vim, but many exploit only a small percentage of the editor's features. Sure, you might know how to do the basics in Vim, but what about using more advanced features such as folding, split windows, and marks? With a little practice, you can really boost your productivity with Vim.

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More in Tux Machines

EasyPup 2.2.14 released

Hot on the heals of EasyOS 2.2.14, EasyPup is released, for those who want a more traditional puppy. The apps and user interface is pretty much the same as EasyOS, but the underlying infrastructure is different. Read more

BSD: End of TrueOS, OpenBSD and FreeBSD at FOSDEM

  • It's Official But Sad: TrueOS Is Over As Once The Best Desktop BSD OS

    It's been on life support for a while but to much sadness, TrueOS indeed is no longer being maintained as the once very promising downstream of FreeBSD that for a while offered arguably the best out-of-the-box BSD desktop experience. TrueOS, formerly known as PC-BSD, is dead. Kris Moore, the VP of Engineering at iXsystems, confirmed earlier this month on their forums that work has ceased on the operating system.

  • OpenBSD -current - Frequent asked questions

    Hello, as there are so many questions about OpenBSD -current on IRC, Mastodon or reddit I’m writing this FAQ in hope it will help people.

    The official FAQ already contains answers about -current like Following -current and using snapshots and Building the system from sources.

  • OpenBSD's 'spinning' CPU time category

    Unix systems have long had a basic breakdown of what your CPU (or CPUs) was spending its time doing. The traditional division is user time, system time, idle time, and 'nice' time (which is user time for tasks that have their scheduling priority lowered through nice(1) or the equivalent), and then often 'interrupt' time, for how much time the system spent in interrupt handling. Some Unixes have added 'iowait', which is traditionally defined as 'the system was idle but one or more processes were waiting for IO to complete'. OpenBSD doesn't have iowait, but current versions have a new time category, 'spinning'.

  • FOSDEM 2020 Conference Recap

    For the third year in a row, I attended FOSDEM, an amazing open source conference in Brussels, Belgium. Taking place, February 1-2, the event is a totally volunteer run conference geared towards promoting the widespread use of free and open source software. The Foundation has sponsored and organized a FreeBSD table there for a few years now.

today's howtos

Debian To Take On COVID-19 With A Biohackathon

Debian developers are wanting to do their part to take on the global coronavirus pandemic by hosting a COVID-19 Biohackathon. This virtual event organized by Debian developers is taking place from 5 to 11 April. Their hope with this biohackathon is to "improve biomedical FOSS and the tools/libraries that support those projects." Among the work they hope to see realized from this hackathon are addressing various bugs, contributing to upstream biomedical open-source software, and related work. Read more