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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 17 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story LLVM/OpenMP News Roy Schestowitz 02/10/2018 - 2:56pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 02/10/2018 - 7:50pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 02/10/2018 - 7:54pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 02/10/2018 - 7:58pm
Story Games: XCOM 2: War of the Chosen and More on GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 03/10/2018 - 2:58am
Story Mozilla: Mojolicious, CSS, MDN, Android Users and Desktop Roy Schestowitz 03/10/2018 - 3:26am
Story IBM Nabla Containers, Kubernetes 1.12 and Platform9 Open Sources Its Kubernetes Etcd Support Tool Roy Schestowitz 1 03/10/2018 - 4:55am
Story Kernel and Security: Code of Conduct, VESA, Kernel Recipes 2018/WireGuard and Latest Updates Roy Schestowitz 03/10/2018 - 4:34am
Story Openwashing of Surveillance and the Latest Microsoft Propaganda From Mac Asay Roy Schestowitz 03/10/2018 - 4:36am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 03/10/2018 - 4:59am

AMD to Slice Up Server in LinuxWorld Demo

Filed under
Hardware

Advanced Micro Devices in April will demonstrate for the first time a new server chip equipped with its AMD Virtualization technology.

Michael Dell on Alienware, growth, and AMD

Filed under
Hardware

In an exclusive interview, Dell Chairman and founder Michael Dell says he's excited about the company's acquisition this week of gaming-PC specialist Alienware, but that Dell still expects "the vast majority of our growth to be organic." His remarks also continue in intriguing ways the company's longtime dance with chipmaker AMD.

Novell's first Linux workgroup suite

Filed under
SUSE

Novell has introduced its first workgroup suite running on Linux. The Novell Open Workgroup Suite includes server and desktop components with management tools, e-mail and collaboration, office products.

Open-Source Framework Means Happy Trails for Java Developers

Filed under
Software

Chris Nelson said he found developing in Java was just too hard, so he decided to do something to make it easier. Now he's about to deliver on it.

TW My sysadmin toolbox

Filed under
Software

I have used Linux since I was eleven, and I'm approaching my seventeenth birthday now. I still consider myself an amateur at using the operating system, but I have discovered quite a few interesting tools to help improve my productivity with Linux. They're not exactly my sysadmin toolbox -- more like my desktop enhancement kit.

Growing Momentum for Desktop Linux/Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

This week Red Hat released Fedora Core 5, the latest Linux desktop distribution which adds news apps, better security and Xen virtualization. For all the improvements to Fedora, the Open Source Development Labs' Desktop Linux Working Group wanted to hear directly from PC users about what they wanted to see in desktop Linux packages - and what factors might be blocking better Linux adoption.

Also: Survey: Financial IT Execs Say Jury Still Out Open Source

Red Hat, Novell, Ubuntu, Linspire & FarStone Top Sponsors for 4th Annual Desktop Linux Summit

Filed under
Linux

The Desktop Linux Summit, the only event to focus exclusively on Linux and open source for desktop computing, has announced the exhibitor lineup for its fourth annual show, which will be held April 24-25, 2006 at the Manchester Grand Hyatt hotel in downtown San Diego, California.

Firefox, Thunderbird Wrecking Relationships

Filed under
Humor

Web browser bugs are routinely blamed for creating huge networks of compromised PCs and undermining the safety of ecommerce transactions. Now one woman says a "security bug" in Mozilla led to the break up of her engagement.

And: Hot on the heels of a woman who blames a bug in Firefox for exposing the flaws in her relationship with a fiancé comes the tale of a young lad whose relationship was hit by the spam filtering shortcomings of Thunderbird, the email client companion of Firefox.

Interview with Michael Robertson, SIPphone

Filed under
Interviews

My interview this morning is with Michael Robertson, founder of MP3.com, Linspire, and now a new startup, SIPphone (www.sipphone.com). I thought it would be interesting to conduct the interview via Michael's own software, so I called him up using the SIPphone software and a voice over IP connection to ask him a bit about the idea behind SIPphone, and what he has been up to lately. The call quality was great, and I also got his insights into what makes a good entrepreneur, and some great advice for startups.

Mozilla considers TV and movie ad campaign

Filed under
Moz/FF

With the competition to find the best creative ideas to help advertise its aims in full swing, the Mozilla Foundation has revealed that it may screen a Firefox advert on national television or in cinemas.

Novell defends SUSE Linux revenue performance

Filed under
SUSE

Novell Inc's president and COO Ron Hovsepian has defended the company's SUSE Linux business, maintaining that it is performing better than the company's revenue figures suggest.

What Thunderbird Lightning Users Want: Microsoft Outlook

Filed under
Moz/FF

The updated calendar extension for Thunderbird, Lightning 0.1, is on the streets. User reactions are upbeat, but they insist on more Outlook-like group scheduling and coordinating, as these users comments on the Lightning Suggestions wiki demonstrate:

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PostgreSQL Database Server Configuration

Filed under
Linux

PostgreSQL is a fully featured object-relational database management system. It supports a large part of the SQL standard and is designed to be extensible by users in many aspects. Some of the features are: ACID transactions, foreign keys, views, sequences, subqueries, triggers, user-defined types and functions, outer joins, multiversion concurrency control. Graphical user interfaces and bindings for many programming languages are available as well.

Read Full article here

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Marcel's Linux App of the Month : kdissert

Filed under
Linux

Even after writing a half dozen books and several hundred articles, I still find it difficult to know where to start when I'm looking at a new project. Getting the germ of whatever ideas I might have down into something that starts to look and sound intelligent is anything but second nature. Somewhere in my head, there's a jumble of fleeting thoughts, ideas, and concepts, running every which way with no map for me to follow other than some casual mental digging here and there. If you find yourself in the same kind of cerebral jungle, what you and I really need is a mind map.

Tux goes retail: How open source is faring in big box retail stores

Filed under
Linux

Free open source software is making slow in-roads into the world of big box retail. This article is the first of a series which take a detailed look inside the world of retail as Tux is experiencing it.

Core Web Application Development with PHP and MySQL

Filed under
Interviews

Core Web Application Development with PHP and MySQL is a new addition to the Prentice Hall Core Series of books. It aims to present a complete approach to the development of web applications. In this article, we interview the author of the book, Marc Wandschneider, who has been programming in various professional and open source degrees for well over a decade now.

Book Review: A Beginner's Guide, Fourth Edition

Filed under
Reviews

One of the things I look for in a "beginner's guide" is a well rounded content selection. When I'm trying to learn how to administer Linux, nothing is more frustrating than to pick up a book that's advertised as "a complete guide", only to discover that either there are holes in the information base or that each subject is treated far too lightly to really learn anything.

Flock fellow flees: I'm flocking off

Filed under
Software

Flock's Chris Messina is leaving the company, five months after it unveiled its beta browser to the public. He served as "Director of Experience and Open Source Ambassador" for the startup.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Writing Kubernetes controllers the wrong way is still useful

    When you try to shoehorn an idea, approach, or code into a situation that's not expecting it, you get surprising and fun results. In his Lightning Talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x), "Writing Kubernetes controllers 'the wrong way' is still useful," sysadmin Chris McEniry shares his experience with an out-of-cluster etcd-controller. Watch Chris' Lightning Talk to learn more about managing etcd controllers and living to tell the tale.

  • VMware's proposed Pivotal acquisition shows Cloud Foundry's strength

    Abby Kearns, executive director of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, reports that in the soon-to-be-released Cloud Foundry end-user survey, "In just two years, broad deployment of Cloud Foundry has nearly doubled. With 45% of our users describing their Cloud Foundry use as 'broad' (compared to 30% in 2018 and 23% in 2017)."

  • Magnetic Lasso for Krita is here

    I won’t say that I am done with Magnetic Lasso now, but the results are a lot better now to be honest. Take a look at one of the tests that I did,

  • [antiX] swapgs mitigations kernels available

    Latest secure kernels available in the repos for 32 and 64 bit architecture (stretch, buster, testing and sid). 5.2.8 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486) 4.19.66 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486) 4.9.189 (64 bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486) Users are strongly advised to upgrade.

  • M5Stack M5StickV is a Tiny AI Camera for Maker Projects

Rust will offer refunds as they stop shipping Linux client

Multiplayer survival game Rust will soon stop shipping its Linux client and offer refunds to those who have played using it. They’ve penned a blog post explaining that it had become a “cheater’s sanctuary,” and that a September update addressing performance and security not being supported on the OS was the final straw, despite believing that supporting Linux is still “the right thing to do.” Read more

10 Best Terminal emulators for Linux that are worth giving a try

Terminal emulator on a Linux system does not need any introduction. It is one of the most important tools in a Linux system, all users know about. The Terminal emulator on Linux can be useful for installing a program, changing some system settings, opening a program or run any script and do any other small and big tasks on a Linux computer with just the appropriate command. Thus, it will not be wrong, if you call it the heart of a Linux system from a user’s perspective. Just like most other elements in a Linux system, a new Terminal emulator can also be installed and used. So, without any further delay, let’s get started with the top 10 alternatives to the default Linux Terminal emulator and the reasons you should opt for them. Read more

The New Firmware Manager: Updating firmware across Linux distributions

Over the past few months, System76 has been developing a simple, easy-to-use tool for updating firmware on Pop!_OS and System76 hardware. Today, we’re excited to announce that you can now check and update firmware through Settings on Pop!_OS, and through the firmware manager GTK application on System76 hardware running other Debian-based distributions. One of the issues we faced with with firmware management on Linux was the lack of options for graphical frontends to firmware management services like fwupd and system76-firmware. For fwupd, the only solutions available were to distribute either GNOME Software or KDE Discover, which is not viable for Linux distributions which have their own application centers, or frontends to package managers. For system76-firmware, an official GTK application existed, but it only supported updating System76 firmware, when it would be more ideal if it could support updating firmware from both services. Read more Also: System76 Unveils Their Firmware Manager Project For Graphically Updating Firmware