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Sunday, 17 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Lots of Microsoft Openwashing This Past Week

Filed under
Microsoft

Open source radio system delivers emergency alerts and music to the Yukon and beyond

Filed under
OSS

"Radio Rob" Hopkins lives in Tagish, Yukon, 120km south of the capital city, Whitehorse. It is here that he created Open Broadcaster, an open source system that enables small rural market radio stations to manage their operations and volunteers.

Having lived in the Yukon for 35 years, back when there was no phone or internet, Rob got into communications to set up a low-power FM (LPFM) station for the community. He wanted to make it easier to manage stations, so he made a pitch to the Yukon government for seed money to develop an application to use the internet to run a radio station and deliver the last mile through FM radio.

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PCLinuxOS Gets November 2019 ISO with Refreshed Themes, Latest Updates

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS community released their monthly ISO snapshots for November 2019, a release that contains all the latest bug and security updates, as well as various improvements.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is out now as the latest and most up to date installation medium for this independently developed and user-friendly GNU/Linux distribution, including a fully updated system with all the updates released as of November 12th, 2019, with refreshed themes for GRUB, bootsplash, and the desktop.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is available in there different edition, with the KDE Plasma 5, Xfce, and MATE desktop environments. The PCLinuxOS 2019.11 KDE edition ships with the latest KDE Plasma 5.17.3 desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 19.08.3 and KDE Frameworks 5.64.0 open-source software suites.

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Programming: GCC, RcppEigen and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Introduce a new GCC option, --record-gcc-command-line
    I would like to propose the following patches which introduce a compile option --record-gcc-command-line. When passed to gcc, it saves the command line option into the produced object file. The option makes it trivial to trace back how a file was compiled and by which version of the gcc. It helps with debugging, reproducing bugs and repeating the build process.
    
    This option is similar to -frecord-gcc-switches. However, they have three fundamental differences: Firstly, -frecord-gcc-switches saves the internal state after the argv is processed and passed by the driver. As opposed to that, --record-gcc-command-line saves the command-line as received by the driver. Secondly, -frecord-gcc-switches saves the switches as separate entries into a mergeable string section. Therefore, the entries belonging to different object files get mixed up after being linked. The new --record-gcc-command-line, on the other hand, creates one entry per invocation. By doing so, it makes it clear which options were used together in a single gcc invocation. Lastly, --record-gcc-command-line also adds the version of the gcc into this single entry to make it clear which version of gcc was called with any given command line. This is useful in cases where .comment section reports multiple versions.
    
    While there are also similarities between the implementations of these two options, they are completely independent. These commands can be used separately or together without issues. I used the same section that -frecord-gcc-switches uses on purpose. I could not use the name -frecord-gcc-command-line for this option; because of a {f*} in the specs, which forwards all options starting with -f to cc1/cc1plus as is. This is not we want for this option. We would like to append it a filename as well to pass the argv of the driver to child processes.
    
    This functionality operates as the following: It saves gcc's argv into a temporary file, and passes --record-gcc-command-line <tempfilename> to cc1 or cc1plus. The functionality of the backend is implemented via a hook. This patch includes an example implementation of the hook for elf targets: elf_record_gcc_command_line function. This function reads the given file and writes gcc's version and the command line into a mergeable string section, .GCC.command.line.
    
    
  • GCC Developers Discuss New Option For Recording Compiler Flags / Details In Binaries

    GCC developers recently have been discussing a new proposal over an option for preserving the command-line flags/options used when building a binary as well as the associated compiler version.

    The proposal sent out last week was over a --record-gcc-command-line option to save the compiler options into the produced object file. The proposal is in the name of helping debugging, reproducing bugs, and repeating build process. There is already a -frecord-gcc-switches option that is somewhat similar in behavior but with key differences as explained in the proposal.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.3.7.0

    A new minor release 0.3.3.7.0 of RcppEigen arrived on CRAN today (and just went to Debian too) bringing support for Eigen 3.3.7 to R.

    This release comes almost a year after the previous minor release 0.3.3.5.0. Besides the upgrade to the new upstream version, it brings a few accumulated polishes to the some helper and setup functions, and switches to the very nice tinytest package for unit tests; see below for the full list. As before, we carry a few required changes to Eigen in a diff.

  • “Higher Performance Python” at PyDataCambridge 2019

    I’ve had the pleasure of speaking at the first PyDataCambridge conference (2019), this is the second PyData conference in the UK after PyDataLondon (which colleagues and I co-founded 6 years back). I’m super proud to see PyData spread to 6 regional meetups and now 2 UK conferences.

Games: Baba, Dicey Dungeons, Factorio and Enabling GameMode

Filed under
Gaming
  • Excellent rule-changing puzzle game Baba Is You is getting an official level editor

    Baba Is You, the truly excellent puzzle game where you have to break the rules of each level to beat them is getting a big update soon. See Also: previous thoughts on it here.

    How do you break these rules? Well, on each level there's logic blocks you can push around to change everything. Turn yourself into a rock, a jellyfish, make it so touching a wall wins instead of a flag you can't access and all kinds of really crazy things it becomes quite hilarious.

  • Dicey Dungeons outsold Terry Cavanagh's last two Steam games in the first month

    Terry Cavanagh, the indie developer behind VVVVVV, Super Hexagon and the latest Dicey Dungeons has a new blog post out talking about how well Dicey Dungeons has done and what's to come next.

    Leading up to the release, Cavanagh was doing a blog post each day for seven days. This latest post from yesterday then, is long overdue considering Dicey Dungeons launched in August.

  • Factorio is leaving Early Access in September next year

    As a result of the team behind Factorio feeling like it's going on for too long, they've now set a proper release date.

    In their latest Friday Facts update, they mentioned how their "when it's done" approach has served them well to create a high-quality game "but if we continued this way, we would be doing it basically forever". Part of the issue is that they want to work on new features and add content, instead of constant polishing. So they're setting a date publicly now "so we have to stick with it". With that in mind, it's going to leave Early Access on September 25, 2020.

    Development is not ending once they hit the big 1.0, they also don't want to say it's 100% finished either. Like a lot of games, as long as the money keeps coming in they will likely keep adding to it.

  • Enabling GameMode on Linux for best gaming performance

Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS Now Patched Against Latest Intel CPU Flaws

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Security

After responding to the latest security vulnerabilities affecting Intel CPU microarchitectures, Red Hat has released new Linux kernel security updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating systems to address the well-known ZombieLoad v2 flaw and other issues. The CentOS community also ported the updates for their CentOS Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 7 systems.

The security vulnerabilities patched in this new Linux kernel security update are Machine Check Error on Page Size Change (IFU) (CVE-2018-12207), TSX Transaction Asynchronous Abort (TAA) (CVE-2019-11135), Intel GPU Denial Of Service while accessing MMIO in lower power state (CVE-2019-0154), and Intel GPU blitter manipulation that allows for arbitrary kernel memory write (CVE-2019-0155).

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Firefox vs. Chrome Browser Performance On Intel Ice Lake + Power/Memory Usage Tests

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Using Firefox 70 (including WebRender) and Google Chrome 78, here are our latest round of Linux web browser benchmarks tested on the Dell XPS Ice Lake laptop. Making this round of Linux browser benchmarking more interesting is also including power consumption and RAM usage metrics for the different browser benchmarks.

For those wondering about whether Firefox or Chrome makes the most sense for Linux laptops, these benchmarks from the Dell XPS with Intel Core i7-1065G7 will hopefully be useful.

Ubuntu 19.10 with the Linux 5.3 kernel was running on this Intel Ice Lake laptop while using the official builds of Mozilla Firefox 70.0 (both out of the box and with WebRender) and Google Chrome 78. The AC system power consumption was monitored on battery and the total RAM usage was being monitored throughout testing as well. All of the benchmarking was carried out using the Phoronix Test Suite.

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Leftovers: KPublicTransport, ONNX and Security

Filed under
KDE
OSS
Security
  • KPublicTransport Backend Selection

    At Akademy earlier this year I presented the current state of KPublicTransport, and mentioned a remaining privacy-relevant issue in there for giving its users full control about which backend service to query. This has now been addressed, with a way to list and chose backends globally or per request.

  • The ONNX format becomes the newest Linux Foundation project

    The Linux Foundation today announced that ONNX, the open format that makes machine learning models more portable, is now a graduate-level project inside of the organization’s AI Foundation. ONNX was originally developed and open-sourced by Microsoft and Facebook in 2017 and has since become somewhat of a standard, with companies ranging from AWS to AMD, ARM, Baudi, HPE, IBM, Nvidia and Qualcomm supporting it. In total, more than 30 companies now contribute to the ONNX code base.

  • IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 138 is available for testing

    Just with the release of IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 137, we are making the next update available to address and mitigate recently announced vulnerabilities in Intel processors.

  • White Screen of Death: Admins up in arms after experimental Google emission borks Chrome

    An experimental feature silently rolled out to the stable Chrome release on Tuesday caused chaos for IT admins this week after users complained of facing white, featureless tabs on Google's massively popular browser.

    The issue affected thousands of businesses' terminal servers, with multiple users on the same server experiencing "white screen of death" at the same time.

today's howtos and programming

Filed under
Development
HowTos

How to Troubleshoot Package Not Found Error on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

This beginner tutorial shows how to go about fixing the E: Unable to locate package error on Ubuntu Linux.
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Stadia Smells Like Vapour(ware)

Filed under
Google
Gaming
  • Will Google's Stadia Game Streaming Platform Be A Dud?

    On November 19, Google is expected to finally launch the company's long awaited game streaming platform, Google Stadia. Stadia is being heralded as the vanguard of a new push to eliminate your local game console, and shift all of the computing and processing power to the cloud. The shift to game streaming is likely inevitable, the only problem is that Stadia may be a little ahead of its time. And, like so many Google projects (like Google Fiber), game developers are apparently worried that Google may waffle on its commitment to the project...

  • Google Stadia's Upcoming Launch Looking Increasingly Incomplete

    Google Stadia is set to debut on November 19. That launch already had several caveats, however, including the fact that not everyone who pre-ordered the Founder's Edition bundle will receive their hardware in time for the platform's debut. Now the company has said that many of Stadia's multiplayer-centric features won't be ready in time for the game streaming platform's launch either.

    The additional information about Stadia's launch arrived during an Ask Me Anything (AMA) session with Stadia product director Andrey Doronichev and Beri Lee, who "look[s] after the Publisher experience on Stadia," on Reddit. Doronichev and Lee revealed that many of Stadia's features aren't ready in time for launch and said that several won't make their debut until some time in 2020.

  • Stadia looks to be very limited at launch and not just the amount of games

    The official launch of Stadia is only days away, so Google recently hosted a Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything) and we have some more details to share about it.

Lenovo X1 Extreme 2nd Generation To Have Better Touchpad Input On Linux 5.4

Filed under
Linux

The Synaptics RMI(4) mode is the modern protocol used by the hardware for touch input handling and should yield a better input experience for users with less quirks.

With the enabling of RMI mode for this laptop just requiring its LEN0402 ID to be added to a list, it was safe for the current Linux 5.4 cycle (and for back-porting to stable series) rather than needing to wait for Linux 5.5.

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AMD OverDrive and EXT4 in Linux 5.5

Filed under
Linux
  • AMD OverDrive Overclocking To Finally Work For Radeon Navi GPUs With Linux 5.5 Kernel

    While most Linux gamers don't appear to be into GPU overclocking, one of the limitations of the Radeon RX 5000 "Navi" series support with the AMD open-source driver to date has been no overclocking support. With the upcoming Linux 5.5 kernel that is set to change.

    With the Linux 5.5 kernel there is slated to be the "OverDrive" overclocking support in place for Navi graphics processors with the AMDGPU kernel driver.

  • EXT4 On Linux 5.5 To Support Encryption On Smaller Block Sizes

    For the past four years going back to Linux 5.5 has been EXT4 native file-system encryption making use of the kernel's FSCRYPT framework that is shared between several file-systems. That support has continued to improve with time and with Linux 5.5 another limitation will be dropped.

    One of the lingering limitations of the EXT4 encryption code is that it hasn't worked where the file-system block size is different from the system's page size. But beginning with Linux 5.5, a different block size compared to the kernel's page size will be supported while still allowing encryption to be enabled. Namely this will help those preferring non-default block sizes for better efficiency on different storage devices or other reasons.

Updated Debian 10: 10.2 released

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project is pleased to announce the second update of its stable distribution Debian 10 (codename buster). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 10 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old buster media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

Those who frequently install updates from security.debian.org won't have to update many packages, and most such updates are included in the point release.

New installation images will be available soon at the regular locations.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source radio system delivers emergency alerts and music to the Yukon and beyond

"Radio Rob" Hopkins lives in Tagish, Yukon, 120km south of the capital city, Whitehorse. It is here that he created Open Broadcaster, an open source system that enables small rural market radio stations to manage their operations and volunteers. Having lived in the Yukon for 35 years, back when there was no phone or internet, Rob got into communications to set up a low-power FM (LPFM) station for the community. He wanted to make it easier to manage stations, so he made a pitch to the Yukon government for seed money to develop an application to use the internet to run a radio station and deliver the last mile through FM radio. Read more

PCLinuxOS Gets November 2019 ISO with Refreshed Themes, Latest Updates

The PCLinuxOS community released their monthly ISO snapshots for November 2019, a release that contains all the latest bug and security updates, as well as various improvements. PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is out now as the latest and most up to date installation medium for this independently developed and user-friendly GNU/Linux distribution, including a fully updated system with all the updates released as of November 12th, 2019, with refreshed themes for GRUB, bootsplash, and the desktop. PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is available in there different edition, with the KDE Plasma 5, Xfce, and MATE desktop environments. The PCLinuxOS 2019.11 KDE edition ships with the latest KDE Plasma 5.17.3 desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 19.08.3 and KDE Frameworks 5.64.0 open-source software suites. Read more

Programming: GCC, RcppEigen and Python

  • Introduce a new GCC option, --record-gcc-command-line
    I would like to propose the following patches which introduce a compile option --record-gcc-command-line. When passed to gcc, it saves the command line option into the produced object file. The option makes it trivial to trace back how a file was compiled and by which version of the gcc. It helps with debugging, reproducing bugs and repeating the build process.
    
    This option is similar to -frecord-gcc-switches. However, they have three fundamental differences: Firstly, -frecord-gcc-switches saves the internal state after the argv is processed and passed by the driver. As opposed to that, --record-gcc-command-line saves the command-line as received by the driver. Secondly, -frecord-gcc-switches saves the switches as separate entries into a mergeable string section. Therefore, the entries belonging to different object files get mixed up after being linked. The new --record-gcc-command-line, on the other hand, creates one entry per invocation. By doing so, it makes it clear which options were used together in a single gcc invocation. Lastly, --record-gcc-command-line also adds the version of the gcc into this single entry to make it clear which version of gcc was called with any given command line. This is useful in cases where .comment section reports multiple versions.
    
    While there are also similarities between the implementations of these two options, they are completely independent. These commands can be used separately or together without issues. I used the same section that -frecord-gcc-switches uses on purpose. I could not use the name -frecord-gcc-command-line for this option; because of a {f*} in the specs, which forwards all options starting with -f to cc1/cc1plus as is. This is not we want for this option. We would like to append it a filename as well to pass the argv of the driver to child processes.
    
    This functionality operates as the following: It saves gcc's argv into a temporary file, and passes --record-gcc-command-line <tempfilename> to cc1 or cc1plus. The functionality of the backend is implemented via a hook. This patch includes an example implementation of the hook for elf targets: elf_record_gcc_command_line function. This function reads the given file and writes gcc's version and the command line into a mergeable string section, .GCC.command.line.
    
    
  • GCC Developers Discuss New Option For Recording Compiler Flags / Details In Binaries

    GCC developers recently have been discussing a new proposal over an option for preserving the command-line flags/options used when building a binary as well as the associated compiler version. The proposal sent out last week was over a --record-gcc-command-line option to save the compiler options into the produced object file. The proposal is in the name of helping debugging, reproducing bugs, and repeating build process. There is already a -frecord-gcc-switches option that is somewhat similar in behavior but with key differences as explained in the proposal.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.3.7.0

    A new minor release 0.3.3.7.0 of RcppEigen arrived on CRAN today (and just went to Debian too) bringing support for Eigen 3.3.7 to R. This release comes almost a year after the previous minor release 0.3.3.5.0. Besides the upgrade to the new upstream version, it brings a few accumulated polishes to the some helper and setup functions, and switches to the very nice tinytest package for unit tests; see below for the full list. As before, we carry a few required changes to Eigen in a diff.

  • “Higher Performance Python” at PyDataCambridge 2019

    I’ve had the pleasure of speaking at the first PyDataCambridge conference (2019), this is the second PyData conference in the UK after PyDataLondon (which colleagues and I co-founded 6 years back). I’m super proud to see PyData spread to 6 regional meetups and now 2 UK conferences.

today's howtos