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Friday, 22 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story ​How to easily defeat Linux Encoder ransomware Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2015 - 6:40pm
Story This Album Is So Exclusive That Listeners Must Hack Linux To Hear It Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2014 - 6:42pm
Story Manjaro Linux 16.06 Preview Released Mohd Sohail 07/03/2016 - 4:31am
Story 10 projects to fork in 2016 Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2015 - 11:24am
Story 11 ways to get involved with Humanitarian FOSS Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 6:52pm
Story 12 open education videos for China Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 7:54am
Story 2014: Year of open source miracles Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2014 - 3:10pm
Story 2015: The year the UN resets the count Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 12:13pm
Story 3 Drupal education distros reviewed Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 7:10pm
Story 3 open source alternatives to Microsoft Publisher Roy Schestowitz 07/07/2016 - 8:34am

Solaris/UNIX: New Solaris Update/Release, Mystery of Unix History

Filed under
OS
  • Announcing Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU15

    Today we are releasing SRU 15, the November 2019 SRU, for Oracle Solaris 11.4. It is available via 'pkg update' from the support repository or by downloading the SRU from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2433412.1.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU15 Has A Number Of Package Updates

    While there is no sign of Solaris 11.5 or Solaris.Next (last year was a road-map pointing to Solaris 11.Next in H2'19 or H1'20 that has since been removed), Oracle does continue putting out more updates to the Solaris 11.4 series.

    Oracle Solaris 11.4 SRU 15 was released on Tuesday as the latest monthly update to the Solaris stable series. With Solaris 11.4 SRU 15 are more Python 3 modules being added along with other Python updates, updating the GCC compiler against v9.2, updates to other toolchain bits like CMake, and a wide range of security updates.

  • A Mystery of Unix History

    The two most popular historic editors on Unix, vi and emacs, both make heavy use of these features (Emacs using Esc when Alt or Meta is unavailable). Some of the later entries in the DEC terminal line, especially the vt510, supported key remapping or alternative keyboards, which can address the Esc issue, but not entirely.

    According to the EmacsOnTerminal page and other research, at least the vt100 through the vt420 lacked Esc by default. Ctrl-3 and Ctrl-[ could send the character. However, this is downright terrible for both vi and Emacs (as this is the only way to trigger meta commands in Emacs).

    What’s more, it seems almost none of these old serial terminal support hardware flow control, and flow control is an absolute necessity on many. That implies XON/XOFF, which use Ctrl-S and Ctrl-Q — both of which are commonly used in Emacs.

Mesa 19.2.5

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hi list,

I'd like to announce mesa 19.2.5. This is a return to our regularly scheduled
release cadence, featuring a reasonable number of fixes. In general things are
slowing down on the 19.2 branch, and things are starting to look pretty nice.

There's a little bit over everything in here, with anv and radeonsi standing out
as the two biggest components getting changes, but core mesa, core gallium,
llvmpipe, nir, egl, i965, tgsi, st/mesa, spirv, and the Intel compiler also
fixes in this release.

Dylan


Shortlog
========

Ben Crocker (1):
      llvmpipe: use ppc64le/ppc64 Large code model for JIT-compiled shaders

Brian Paul (1):
      Call shmget() with permission 0600 instead of 0777

Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (1):
      spirv: Don't leak GS initialization to other stages

Danylo Piliaiev (1):
      i965: Unify CC_STATE and BLEND_STATE atoms on Haswell as a workaround

Dylan Baker (4):
      docs: Add SHA256 sum for for 19.2.4
      cherry-ignore: Update for 19.2.4 cycle
      docs: Add relnotes for 19.2.5
      VERSION: bump for 19.2.5

Eric Engestrom (1):
      egl: fix _EGL_NATIVE_PLATFORM fallback

Ian Romanick (2):
      nir/algebraic: Add the ability to mark a replacement as exact
      nir/algebraic: Mark other comparison exact when removing a == a

Illia Iorin (1):
      mesa/main: Ignore filter state for MS texture completeness

Jason Ekstrand (1):
      anv: Stop bounds-checking pushed UBOs

Lepton Wu (1):
      gallium: dri2: Use index as plane number.

Lionel Landwerlin (3):
      anv: invalidate file descriptor of semaphore sync fd at vkQueueSubmit
      anv: remove list items on batch fini
      anv/wsi: signal the semaphore in the acquireNextImage

Marek Olšák (3):
      st/mesa: fix Sanctuary and Tropics by disabling ARB_gpu_shader5 for them
      tgsi_to_nir: fix masked out image loads
      tgsi_to_nir: handle PIPE_FORMAT_NONE in image opcodes

Paulo Zanoni (1):
      intel/compiler: fix nir_op_{i,u}*32 on ICL

Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (3):
      radeonsi: disable sdma for gfx10
      radeonsi: tell the shader disk cache what IR is used
      radeonsi: fix shader disk cache key


git tag: mesa-19.2.5

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Also: Mesa 19.2.5 Released With Intel Vulkan + RadeonSI Driver Fixes

Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • #100DaysOfCode, Day 001 – Dates & Times

    We begin with a date/time project.
    Python has objects (primitives) to deal with dates and times.
    They are part of the datetime module, which is part of the Python Standard Library.

  • Top 25 Python Libraries for Data Science Projects

    This post is attempting to enlighten you about the most useful and popular Python libraries used by data scientists. And why only Python, because it has been the leading programming language for solving real-time data science problems.

    These libraries have been tested to give excellent results in various areas like Machine Learning (ML), Deep Learning, Artifical Intelligence (AI), and Data Science challenges. Hence, you can confidently induct any of these without putting too much time and effort in R&D.

    In every data science project, programmers, even architects, use to spend considerable time researching the Python libraries that can be the best fit. And we believe this post might give them the right heads up, cut short the time spent, and let them deliver projects much faster.

  • Invalid Syntax in Python: Common Reasons for SyntaxError

    Python is known for its simple syntax. However, when you’re learning Python for the first time or when you’ve come to Python with a solid background in another programming language, you may run into some things that Python doesn’t allow. If you’ve ever received a SyntaxError when trying to run your Python code, then this guide can help you. Throughout this tutorial, you’ll see common examples of invalid syntax in Python and learn how to resolve the issue.

  • Scraping dynamic websites using Scraper API and Python

    In the last post of scraping series, I showed you how you can use Scraper API to scrape websites that use proxies hence your chance of getting blocked is reduced. Today I am going to show how you can use Scraper API to scrape websites that are using AJAX to render data with the help of JavaScript, Single Page Applications(SPAs) or scraping websites using frameworks like ReactJS, AngularJS or VueJS.

    I will be working on the same code I had written in the introductory post. Let's work on a simple example. There is a website that tells your IP, called HttpBin. If you load via browser it will tell your real IP.

  • Registration for PyCon US 2020 is open!

    We are excited to announce the opening of PyCon US 2020 registration. The registration site has been updated, tweaked, and tested all in the effort to provide you a seamless experience.

    The new system will allow you to access, view, and add to your current registration. You can book and view hotel reservations and request changes if needed right through your dashboard.

  • The Incredible Disaster of Python 3

    I have long noted issues with Python 3?s bytes/str separation, which is designed to have a type ?bytes? that is a simple list of 8-bit characters, and ?str? which is a Unicode string. After apps started using Python 3, I started noticing issues: they couldn?t open filenames that were in ISO-8859-1, gpodder couldn?t download podcasts with 8-bit characters in their title, etc. I have files on my system dating back to well before widespread Unicode support in Linux.

    Due to both upstream and Debian deprecation of Python 2, I have been working to port pygopherd to Python 3. I was not looking forward to this task. It turns out that the string/byte types in Python 3 are even more of a disaster than I had at first realized.

    [...]

    On POSIX platforms such as Unix, a filename consists of one or more 8-bit bytes, which may be any 8-bit value other than 0x00 or 0x2F (‘/’). So a file named “test\xf7.txt” is perfectly acceptable on a Linux system, and in ISO-8859-1, that filename would contain the division sign ÷. Any language that can’t process valid filenames has serious bugs – and Python is littered with these bugs.

The 10 Best Geometry Software for Linux System in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today whatever you consider, be it day to day life, physics, chemistry, architecture, space science, everywhere there is geometry. The invention of the computer has invented critical geometries and quick solutions to solve those. Many software is created to make geometry accessible and easy for everyone. The Linux dominated tech world has also created some excellent software for geometry. Thus, we shall discuss some geometry software for Linux that can fulfill almost all its related issues.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, FLOSS Weekly, and "Why Doesn't Linux Work on my PC?!"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 2019-11-20 | Linux Headlines

    Slack releases an open source mesh network, Private Internet Access is being bought, an update on the world's top supercomputers, another init system debate option for Debian to consider, and NVIDIA's new accelerated computing platform.

  • FLOSS Weekly 556: Chezmoi

    Chezmoi helps you manage your personal configuration files across multiple machines. It's flexible, personal and secure, robust, and fast and easy to use. It has particularly strong support for security, allowing you to manage secrets (e.g. passwords, access tokens, and private keys) securely and seamlessly using either gpg encryption or a password manager of your choice.

  • Why Doesn't Linux Work on my PC?!

    Why doesn't Linux work on your computer? In this video I explore some of the common reasons why this might be the case. I'll discuss some tips for finding the right hardware, and some general understanding of what some of the challenges are that we face with Linux compatibility today.

Fedora's 2019 Elections

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 31 elections voting now open

    Voting in the Fedora 31 elections is now open. Go to the Elections app to cast your vote. Voting closes at 23:59 UTC on Thursday 5 December. Don’t forget to claim your “I Voted” badge when you cast your ballot. Links to candidate interviews are below.

  • Council election: Interview with Alberto Rodríguez Sánchez (bt0dotninja)

    I know that it is a great responsibility and also know than the time of my fellow contributors is very valuable so I don’t want to waste it. I will be in every meeting and commenting on every ticket doing always my best.

  • Council election: Interview with John M. Harris, Jr. (johnmh)

    I believe that we’ve been rushing to make change where there is no call for it recently. We may be inadvertently ostracizing users and developers by moving from conventional tools, and moving away from our Four Foundations: Freedom, Friends, Features and First.

    For example, recently users were provided with easy ways to install proprietary software on Fedora (NVIDIA proprietary drivers, Google Chrome browser), without being told why we don’t have proprietary software (other than firmware) in the repositories to begin with. More and more, we often seem to be overlooking the first of the Four Foundations, Freedom.

  • FESCo election interview: Randy Barlow (bowlofeggs)

    There have been many regressions with ease of use for tooling that packagers need to use to deliver software to Fedora’s users over the past few years. Quite a few things are manual now that used to be automatic. As a member of the infrastructure group, I have some first hand knowledge of how and why these changes happened, and I have ideas on how we can improve them.

    There is also a project aimed at bringing the CentOS and Fedora dist-gits together in the horizon. I’ve been working on gathering requirements for this project with some other folks, and has potential to lead towards many technical changes being proposed.

  • FESCo election interview: Zbigniew Jędrzejewski-Szmek (zbyszek)
  • FESCo election: Interview with Justin Forbes (jforbes)

    There is no question that modularity is the biggest technical issue affecting the Fedora community at the moment, and probably over the next year. I believe my insight comes from a few places. I was involved with rPath quite some time ago, where we tackled some of the issues that modularity is trying to solve. And as a kernel maintainer by day to day job, I don’t have any particular stake in modularity, so I can view it objectively, with an eye to what is best for Fedora over the long term. I have been involved with Fedora for a very long time, I do have a vested interest in the continued improvement of Fedora and the success and growth of the community.

  • FESCo election: Interview with Kevin Fenzi (kevin)

    I think that modularity and the issues around it are going to continue for a while. I hope I can provide some help in bringing the ‘lets drop modularity and forget it happened’ and the ‘lets modularize everything’ camps together on some solution that works not only for Fedora, but our downstream distros too.

  • FESCo election: interview with David Cantrell (dcantrel)

    Developer controls for gating and CI. A lot of work has been happening in the context of continuous integration. We created new services, developed processes, and wrote tests. These are all beneficial. I think Fedora needs to ensure we implement developer tools that do not disrupt workflows and which are stable. In my project rpminspect, a Koji RPM and module build analysis tool, I think about developers who are running it to compare builds. A comparison of builds of zlib is very different than comparing two kernel builds, yet I still have a desire to make the tool work for both use cases, so I have added functionality to ensure it will. As we work on projects for gating and CI, we need to keep in mind the broad range and types of software that makeup Fedora.

  • FESCo election: interview with Fabio Valentini (decathorpe)

    One of the big issues I see today is the increasingly large number of packages that fail to build or install on fedora, which seems to have about doubled between Fedora 29 and rawhide, according to my data. I am trying to reintroduce a regular dependency check report for rawhide (and maybe stable/testing as well), which would at least make the problem more visible, and provide pointers to the most problematic missing dependencies.

    There’s also the fallout from the – currently incomplete (or broken, depending on who you ask) – implementation of Modularity, which has caused upgrade issues (the “libgit2 issue”), various issues around the Java stack, including the broken eclipse packages in fedora 31+ and the “forced move” to modules (or even the recommendation to use the flatpak version instead), and so on. I’ve been actively working to keep the non-modular Java stack maintained under the umbrella of the Stewardship SIG, so packagers who can’t (or won’t) move their packages into modules don’t suffer from this current, broken situation.

  • FESCo election: interview with Miro Hrončok (churchyard)

    I think that the most important issue the Fedora community is facing at the moment, and will keep facing for the foreseeable future, is not really technical but instead a communication problem of how to talk about our technical changes and challenges.

  • FESCo election: interview with Peter Walter (pwalter)

    We have a lot of people being unhappy how Modularity was “forced” on them in Fedora. I’d like to be a voice of this community and advocate of going back to simple yum repos to ship the default package set, and leaving Modularity strictly as an add-on one can choose, but doesn’t have to use.

Games: Godot, Play Together and XWayland

Filed under
Gaming
  • Godot Engine has a new Platinum sponsor with gambling game dev Interblock

    Good news for Godot Engine, as they have another company supporting their work on the free and open source game engine.

    This time, it's Interblock who has become a Platinum level sponsor. This means they're pledging at least $1,500 a month on the Godot Engine Patreon. Of their current $12.1k target to hire another developer, they're currently sat at just over $11k so not far to go.

  • INTERBLOCK SUPPORTS GODOT DEVELOPMENT

    We are happy to announce that Interblock is now supporting Godot's development as Platinum sponsor! For this occasion, we asked them to share some words about the company, why they chose to support Godot and their plans to use the engine for their products.

  • Remote Play Together released out of Beta, big sale now on Steam

    Valve have decided to remove the training wheels from Remote Play Together and give it a released sticker along with a big sale.

    What is Remote Play Together? It's a feature available in the Steam client, that allows you to host a local multiplayer game for others online to actually join you. Only the host needs to own a copy too! It's pretty sweet stuff and works across Linux, macOS, Windows, Android and iOS for some sweet cross-platform online gaming together.

  • XWayland Work Pending To Address Game Tearing/Stuttering

    The long overdue X.Org Server 1.21 still hasn't been organized for release but at least the extra time is allowing more XWayland bits to land.

    It's looking increasingly unlikely X.Org Server 1.21 will see a 2019 release especially with the holidays being just around the corner. Last month plans were expressed for CI-driven, automated releases of the X.Org Server on a timed basis but so far those plans haven't turned into action. The X.Org Server 1.20 series has been out for eighteen months and 1.21 hasn't even been branched yet, well off their past six month release cadence. Though at least we continue seeing more XWayland changes land, which along with GLAMOR is where most of the X.Org Server changes are happening these days.

Koalas Need Our Help

Filed under
Just talk

Koalas Need Our Help

Watching videos/photos of Koalas being rescued from a charred/burning forests in Australia is heart-breaking and devastating. More than 350 Koalas are reported being dead and these numbers are growing. Those who live far from Australia (just like me) can't help physically rescue them, but a small amount of money/donation to sustain the hospital/facilities, volunteers and rescuers is of great help. Koala is just one of the many species that perish from the bushfire and they need our help, so please donate through the GoFundMe page and through other legitimate websites. Help those who support animal welfare.

Zorin OS 15 Lite Released as a Windows 7 Replacement, Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Based on Canonical's latest long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, Zorin OS 15 Lite is here packed with some of the most advanced and efficient software components and the latest Xfce 4.14 desktop environment, which provides a user-friendly experience and promises extend the lifespan of your PC for years to come.

"With Zorin OS 15 Lite, we've condensed the full Zorin OS experience into a streamlined operating system, designed to run fast on computers as old as 15 years. With version 15, we’ve gone the extra mile to make the XFCE 4.14-based desktop feel familiar and user-friendly to new users, especially those moving away from Windows 7," reads today's announcement.

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Native Linux & Raspberry Pi support for checkra1n jailbreak hinted by developer

Filed under
Linux

Despite hitting the market first, iPhone comes behind Android in terms of popularity. We admit the price plays a significant role here. But, a Samsung or Huawei flagship user who can afford an iPhone will tell you the level of customisation or convenience is what brought them to Android.

Let’s set the convenience part aside because it is not really an issue after we get accustomed to the whole ecosystem of a device. However when it comes to the customisation, we can’t deny Android from bagging the pole position.

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Linux Kernel Security in a Nutshell: How to Secure Your Linux System

Filed under
Linux
Security

The Linux kernel is the core component of the Linux operating system, maintaining complete control over everything in the system. It is the interface between applications and data processing at the hardware level, connecting the system hardware to the application software. The kernel manages input/output requests from software, memory, processes, peripherals and security, among other hefty responsibilities. Needless to say, the Linux kernel is pretty important.

However, with power comes great responsibility, and the Linux kernel is no exception to this rule. Kernel security is critical: it determines the security of the Linux operating system as a whole, as well as the security of every individual system that runs on Linux. Vulnerabilities in the kernel can have serious implications for Linux users, and it is extremely important that users stay up-to-date on news and advisories pertaining to kernel security.

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Mozilla: Webcompat, Firefox 71, Privacy Advice and Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Karl Dubost: Saving Webcompat images as a microservice

    Thinking out loud on separating our images into a separate service. The initial goal was to push the images to the cloud, but I think we could probably have a first step. We could keep the images on our server, but instead of the current save, we could send them to another service, let say upload.webcompat.com with a HTTP PUT. And this service would save them locally.

  • Multiple-column Layout and column-span in Firefox 71

    Firefox 71 is an exciting release for anyone who cares about CSS Layout. While I am very excited to have subgrid available in Firefox, there is another property that I’ve been keeping an eye on. Firefox 71 implements column-span from Multiple-column Layout. In this post I’ll explain what it is and a little about the progress of the Multiple-column Layout specification.

    Multiple-column Layout, usually referred to as multicol, is a layout method that does something quite different to layout methods such as flexbox and grid. If you have some content marked up and displaying in Normal Flow, and turn that into a multicol container using the column-width or column-count properties, it will display as a set of columns. Unlike Flexbox or Grid however, the content inside the columns flows just as it did in Normal Flow. The difference is that it now flows into a number of anonymous column boxes, much like content in a newspaper.

  • The Mozilla Blog: Can Your Holiday Gift Spy on You?

    Mozilla today launches the third-annual *Privacy Not Included, a report and shopping guide identifying which connected gadgets and toys are secure and trustworthy — and which aren’t. The goal is two-fold: arm shoppers with the information they need to choose gifts that protect the privacy of their friends and family. And, spur the tech industry to do more to safeguard consumers.

    Mozilla researchers reviewed 76 popular connected gifts available for purchase in the United States across six categories: Toys & Games; Smart Home; Entertainment; Wearables; Health & Exercise; and Pets. Researchers combed through privacy policies, sifted through product and app specifications, reached out to companies about their encryption and bug bounty programs, and more. As a result, we can answer questions like: How accessible is the privacy policy, if there is one? Does the product require strong passwords? Does it collect biometric data? And, Are there automatic security updates?

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 313

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

Graphics and GPUS: NVIDIA, Intel and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • CUDA 10.2 Released With VMM APIs, libcu++ As Parallel Standard C++ Library For GPUs

    NVIDIA has released CUDA 10.2 for SuperComputing 19 week. CUDA 10.2 comes with some interesting changes, including to be the last release that will support Apple's macOS and the introduction of a standard C++ library for GPUs.

  • Intel Iris Plus Ice Lake Graphics Run Great With Mesa 19.3's Gallium3D Driver

    While Mesa 19.3 was the original target for switching to the Intel Gallium3D driver by default for Broadwell and newer, they shifted that goal to Mesa 20.0 to allow more time for testing and ensuring a bug-free experience as users transition from the classic "i965" driver over to "Iris" Gallium3D. But even so if running with Mesa 19.3 today it means better performance for Ice Lake as well as Gen8 and Gen9 hardware too.

  • Vulkan post-processing layer vkBasalt has a new release up with SMAA support

    Continuing to boost the feature set of the post-processing layer for vkBasalt, a new release is up and it appears we missed a few smaller in-between releases too.

    Version 0.2.0 was released yesterday, adding in support for SMAA which is a higher-quality form of anti-aliasing which can be enabled in the config file. With that in vkBasalt now supports: Contrast Adaptive Sharpening, Fast Approximate Anti-Aliasing and Enhanced Subpixel Morphological Anti-Aliasing so it's advancing quite quickly.

Programming: Dart 2.6 and Python Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Dart 2.6 Adds Native Linux Support

    Google's Dart has increased support for native, ahead-of-time (AOT) compilation for Linux, Windows and MacOS. The extra support comes from an extension of Dart's existing compiler set called dart2native, which can be used to create command-line programs.

    Dart is described as a client-optimized language for fast apps on any platform. It began life as an alternative to JavaScript that would be supported directly by browsers, but when this didn't work out it was redeveloped as a better compiler.

  • A couple of handy zsh/bash functions for Python programmers

    Just a quick post today, to tell you about a couple of simple zsh functions that I find handy as a Python programmer.

    First, pyimp – a very simple function that tries to import a module in Python and displays the output. If there is no output then the import succeeded, otherwise you’ll see the error. This saves constantly going into a Python interpreter and trying to import something, making that ‘has it worked or not’ cycle a bit quicker when installing a tricky package.

  • Python CSV

    A CSV (Comma Separated Values) format is one of the most simple and common ways to store tabular data. To represent a CSV file, it must be saved with the .csv file extension.

  • Switching from Python 2 to Python 3: What you need to know

    In 2012, the team maintaining the Python programming language reviewed its options. There were two increasingly different codebases, Python 2 and Python 3. Both were popular, but the newer version was not as widely adopted.

    In addition to Python 3's disruption of changing the underlying way data is handled by completely reworking Unicode support, a major version change allowed non-backward-compatible changes to happen all at once. This decision was documented in 2006. To ease the disruption, Python 2 continued to be maintained, with some features backported. To further help the community transition, the EOL date was extended from 2015 to 2020, another five years.

ExLight Linux Distro Is Now Based on Debian Buster, Powered by Linux Kernel 5.4

Filed under
Linux
Debian

ExLight Build 191120 is now available for download and it's Arne Exton's second GNU/Linux distribution to ship with the latest Linux 5.4 kernel series, which will officially be announced by Linus Torvalds at the end of the week, on November 24th. For now, ExLight Build 191120 ships with Linux kernel 5.4 RC8.

While previous versions of ExLight were based on Ubuntu, starting with Build 191120, the entire distribution is now based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series, featuring the Enlightenment 0.22.4-2 desktop environment and the Calamares 3.2.4-3 graphical installer.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Wi-Fi, Vecow, Arduino, Ghidra for Firmware Deciphering

  • Responding to Growing Demand, Edgewater Launches Wi-Fi Spectrum Slicing Development Kit

    Wi-Fi Spectrum Slicing offers breakthrough performance, slicing available spectrum, and exposing a new level of Wi-Fi spectrum granularity for developers to exploit. Edgewater’s groundbreaking MCSR™ silicon solutions and advanced Linux drivers allow the global Linux community to use the widely adopted Linux and OpenWrt software platforms to harness Edgewater’s technology and invent new and creative applications for the platform.

  • Rugged Kaby Lake vehicle PC does it all on the road or rail

    Vecow’s Linux-friendly “IVH-9024MX ICY” in-vehicle PC runs on a 7th or 6th Gen Core or Xeon CPUs and offers triple displays, 6x SATA bays, 4x PoE+ ports, 2x mini-PCIe, and EN50155: 2017 and EN45545-2 railway compliance. Vecow unveiled the rugged IVH-9024MX ICY back in June as an all-purpose in-vehicle and rolling-stock computer and this week announced certifications for EN50155 and EN45545-2 (fire protection) railway safety standards. This is the first 7th Gen Kaby Lake based fanless embedded system to receive these certifications, claims Vecow.

  • Get started with... Arduino?

    Yes, you read that title right, and no, you haven’t accidentally stumbled upon the Arduino Foundation’s website. Today, we’re pleased to announce a new addition to the Raspberry Pi Press family: Get Started with Arduino, a complete how-to guide to help you get hands on with the other pocket-sized board.

  • Exploring Zyxel GS1900 firmware with Ghidra

    Earlier this year the NSA released Ghidra, a reverse engineering suite with support for a large number of CPU/MCU instruction sets. While I have some experience with Hopper and radare2 I wanted to play with Ghidra to poke around the firmware for my Zyxel GS1900-8 switch which runs on a 32-bit MIPS CPU. All in all this has turned out to be an interesting exploration of both Ghidra and the GS1900-8-2.40(AAHH.2)C0.bix firmware image.

    Initially I wanted to write about poking around the firmware image and showing how one can use Ghidra to explore unknown binaries, but whilst looking around some libraries that are used by this switch I realised there is actually an interesting vulnerability to write about.

Linux Foundation and Openwashing

  • Linux Foundation Training Announces a Free Online Course-Introduction to Hyperledger Sovereign Identity Blockchain Solutions: Indy, Aries & Ursa

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced enrollment is now open for a new, free, course – Introduction to Hyperledger Sovereign Identity Blockchain Solutions: Indy, Aries & Ursa. This course is offered through edX, the trusted platform for learning. To the surprise of absolutely no one, trust is broken on the Internet. Any identity-related data available online can be subject to theft. Breach Level Index says that over 5,880,000 records are stolen every day. The 2019 MidYear QuickView Data Breach Report shows that reported breaches in the first half of 2019 were up 54% compared to midyear 2018 (over 4.1 billion records exposed), with web being the number one breach type for records exposed, and hacking being the number one breach type for incidents. Wherever you go online, the advice is the same–make sure you understand what is behind each button before you click it.

  • Is the future of farming under water?

    "[The] first thing we did was open source our model. In the new economy, we make things accessible to everybody. Anybody with 20 acres and a boat and $30,000 can start their farm and be up and growing the first year. Our farms require minimal capital costs and minimal skill. The potential of replication is tremendous: A network of small ocean farms about the size of Washington State could feed the world and, as bio-fuel, replace all the oil in the United States, while simultaneously capturing five times the amount of carbon as land-based plants," Smith predicts. The 3D ocean farming model consists of an underwater rope scaffolding system, anchors on the floor, and ropes up to the surface as well as horizontal ropes. Farmers grow their crops within this system, such as kelp ("the soy of the sea"). Mussels, scallops, and oysters are grown on the floor, and plants are grown in the mud. GreenWave is disseminating its model for restorative 3D ocean farms through open source manuals, farmer training programs, and an online collaboration platform to create a network of restorative ocean farming communities. Outside of ongoing replication along the waters of Long Island Sound, 3D ocean farmers anywhere in the world will be able to select appropriate native species to restore productive ecosystems along the coast, as reported by the Buckminster Fuller Insititute.

  • Seeds Or Code?

    I'd like to congratulate Microsoft on a truly excellent PR stunt, drawing attention to two important topics about which I've been writing for a long time, the cultural significance of open source software, and the need for digital preservation. Ashlee Vance provides the channel to publicize the stunt in Open Source Code Will Survive the Apocalypse in an Arctic Cave. In summary, near Longyearbyen on Spitzbergen is: [...]

  • What Is DeepMind? A Peek into the World’s Leading Neural Network

    Deep learning refers to an emerging area of machine learning that uses artificial neural networks to make decisions on our behalf as they are more reliable than human decisions. It consists of many interrelated fields including natural language processing (NLP), cognitive computing, recommender systems, board game programs, and image recognition. Ever since its takeover by Google, DeepMind has become the world’s foremost deep learning neural network. Let’s look at the story behind the AI engine, its ongoing applications and whether you should have concerns about privacy in the smart devices where it’s used.

Android Leftovers

Red Hat: CDC, CodeReady and EPEL

  • Red Hat advances Debezium CDC connectors for Apache Kafka support to Technical Preview

    After a couple of months in Developer Preview, the Debezium Apache Kafka connectors for change data capture (CDC) are now available as a Technical Preview as part of the Q4 release of Red Hat Integration. Technology Preview features provide early access to upcoming product innovations, enabling you to test functionality and provide feedback during the development process.

  • Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2 Brings New Tooling to Cloud-Native Development

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the release of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2, a cloud-native development workflow for developers. The new release of CodeReady Workspaces enables developers to create and build applications and services in an environment that mirrors that of production, all running on Red Hat OpenShift, the industry's most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform.

  • What's EPEL, and how do I use it?

    RHEL ships with only a subset of packages that you'll find in Fedora Linux. This makes sense, because there's a lot of software in Fedora that isn't needed in an enterprise environment or falls outside the scope of RHEL. Red Hat maintains and supports the packages in RHEL far longer than the lifespan of a Fedora release, and we select the software we feel is necessary for our customers to be successful in deploying and using RHEL to run their workloads. But Fedora users sometimes find that they miss this or that application that's available in Fedora but not through RHEL. So, EPEL was formed. Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) is a special interest group (SIG) from the Fedora Project that provides a set of additional packages for RHEL (and CentOS, and others) from the Fedora sources. To get a package into EPEL, it has to be in Fedora first. EPEL follows the Fedora Packaging Guidelines to ensure successful integration, and only includes free and open source software that isn't patent encumbered. So you won't find any proprietary software in EPEL or things like multimedia codecs that are restricted by patents, even if software enabling them is under an open source license.