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Wednesday, 19 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu On The Business Desktop

Filed under
Reviews

While the boss was away, I shoved a spare hard-drive into my computer and installed Ubuntu 5.04. I managed to work for a month and a half before the Boss noticed I was using Linux - and that was only because he happened to glance at my screen. Half a year later, I am still using Ubuntu at work and I am more productive than ever.

My name is Simon, I am a Linux addict, and this is my story.

How to Keep the Carriers from Flushing the Net Down the Tubes

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Web

We're hearing tales of two scenarios--one pessimistic, one optimistic--for the future of the Net. If the paranoids are right, the Net's toast. If they're not, it will be because we fought to save it, perhaps in a new way we haven't talked about before. Davids, meet your Goliaths.

Wireless Networking with ndiswrapper

Filed under
HowTos

Wireless cards can be quite a bit of trouble for Linux users. Very few manufacturers have any interest in writing Linux drivers or releasing information about their cards so other people can use this information to write Linux drivers.

US to keep control of domain names, for now

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Web

The United States will keep control of the domain-name system that guides Internet traffic under an agreement reached on Wednesday, resolving a dispute that threatened to fracture the global computer network.

On-Demand Internet - A Stopgap Measure

Filed under
Misc

I've been pondering the rootkit phenomenon over the past week, and the problem ends up boiling itself down to an old assertion: 24/7 connectivity is a bad thing. John C. Dvorak says to scraps Linux, Unix, Mac OS and Windows.

Create relationship diagrams with Graphviz

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HowTos

If you use charts to represent relationships between data or objects in presentations or project reports, try Graphviz. Graphviz is visualization software is designed to help you easily create structural information.

$100 laptop expected in late 2006

Filed under
Hardware

A hand-cranked laptop that will cost roughly $100 is expected to be in the hands of schoolchildren in poorer countries by late 2006.

Top 10 Ways to Protect Your Linux Home System

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HowTos

As a result of articles referring to the threat of Worms and Viruses attacking Linux systems, many new Linux users are in a panic. They are running around wildly, weaping to their mothers for help...

Open-source PCs take a passage to India

Filed under
OSS

The Indian government has struck a deal with a number of PC vendors to pre-install open-source software on computers sold in the country.

Linux marches on

Filed under
Linux

It's easy to lose track of what's going on with Linux. That's due in part to the almost total lack of marketing hype. The kernel crew, led by Linus Torvalds, just keeps working away quietly in the background.

Ubuntu: At times it's a breeze, at times it badgers

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Reviews

I will say this much. True to it's name, this version of Ubuntu is a breeze to install. This will give me more time (and space) to describe the steps I took to get Ubuntu running with the applications that I believe the modern desktop should have.

Microsoft claims firms 'hitting a wall' with Linux

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Microsoft

Microsoft today released the findings of an independent report claiming that the Windows platform is "more consistent, predictable and easier to manage than Linux".

Quake 4 1.0.5 and SDK available

Filed under
Gaming
Installer for Quake4 version 1.0.5 for GNU/Linux is available on IDsoft's ftp and Torrent list now! Documentation and Tutorials about using the SDK can be found here.

Condor: Building a Linux cluster on a budget

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HowTos

So you need a lot of computing power but don't want to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a commercial cluster? You can build a powerful and scalable Linux cluster using only free software and off-the-shelf components. Here's how.

Managing Samba-3: User rights and privileges

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HowTos

When faced with making Linux and Windows work together securely, system administrators can run into trouble if they don't understand or can't correctly use the administrative security controls that are present in the Microsoft Windows operating system (OS) and the Samba-3 equivalents of those controls.

Microsoft Vista could do better on security

Filed under
Microsoft

The world still holds its breath while waiting for the arrival of Window's Vista in 2006, but for security at least, it seems you just might die of asphyxiation before anything changes.

Linux trademark stops train

Filed under
Humor

A TRAIN DRIVER slowed Germany's rail system to a halt after he mistook a giant toy penguin for a dead man in a tuxedo.

AMD: Less of an Underdog

Filed under
Hardware

AMD Chief Executive Hector Ruiz has cause for confidence. AMD now controls about 13% of the mainstream server-chip market, about double its percentage of a year ago. It also has made significant inroads with consumers at retail and is beginning to see more interest from corporate and government buyers.

Linux Quick Fix Notebook

Filed under
Reviews

The Linux book market remains a crowded one, and anyone looking for a practical book on solving problems is likely to have plenty of potential titles to choose from. However, this is a book that deserves to be high on the list.

Linux dominates supercomputing

Filed under
Linux

Other operating systems run crying to their mommies while Linux takes over most of the world's top 500 supercomputers.

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Latest From Libinput

  • libinput and tablet proximity handling
    This is merely an update on the current status quo, if you read this post in a year's time some of the details may have changed libinput provides an API to handle graphics tablets, i.e. the tablets that are used by artists. The interface is based around tools, each of which can be in proximity at any time. "Proximity" simply means "in detectable range". libinput promises that any interaction is framed by a proximity in and proximity out event pair, but getting to this turned out to be complicated. libinput has seen a few changes recently here, so let's dig into those. Remember that proverb about seeing what goes into a sausage? Yeah, that.
  • libinput and the Dell Canvas Totem
    We're on the road to he^libinput 1.14 and last week I merged the Dell Canvas Totem support. "Wait, what?" I hear you ask, and "What is that?". Good question - but do pay attention to random press releases more. The Totem (Dell.com) is a round knob that can be placed on the Dell Canvas. Which itself is a pen and touch device, not unlike the Wacom Cintiq range if you're familiar with those (if not, there's always lmgtfy).
  • Libinput 1.14 Will Support Dell's Totem Input Device
    Dell announced the Totem two years ago while the Linux support is finally getting in order. However, there isn't yet any notable applications/tool-kits at least on Linux that support utilizing this specialized input device. Red Hat input expert Peter Hutterer, who also maintains libinput, has blogged about the Totem support addition for the upcoming libinput 1.14. If you are interested in this unique input device, Peter's post has all the interesting technical bits.

Jami/Ring, finally functioning peer to peer communication client

Some years ago, in 2016, I wrote for the first time about the Ring peer to peer messaging system. It would provide messaging without any central server coordinating the system and without requiring all users to register a phone number or own a mobile phone. Back then, I could not get it to work, and put it aside until it had seen more development. A few days ago I decided to give it another try, and am happy to report that this time I am able to not only send and receive messages, but also place audio and video calls. But only if UDP is not blocked into your network. The Ring system changed name earlier this year to Jami. I tried doing web search for 'ring' when I discovered it for the first time, and can only applaud this change as it is impossible to find something called Ring among the noise of other uses of that word. Now you can search for 'jami' and this client and the Jami system is the first hit at least on duckduckgo. Jami will by default encrypt messages as well as audio and video calls, and try to send them directly between the communicating parties if possible. If this proves impossible (for example if both ends are behind NAT), it will use a central SIP TURN server maintained by the Jami project. Jami can also be a normal SIP client. If the SIP server is unencrypted, the audio and video calls will also be unencrypted. This is as far as I know the only case where Jami will do anything without encryption. Read more