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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Linux 4.8-rc7 Roy Schestowitz 19/09/2016 - 5:39am
Story Linux 4.8.10 Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2016 - 4:53pm
Story Linux 4.8.11 Roy Schestowitz 27/11/2016 - 4:45pm
Story Linux 4.8.13 Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2016 - 8:59pm
Story Linux 4.8.14 Rianne Schestowitz 11/12/2016 - 8:52am
Story Linux 4.8.15 Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2016 - 9:15pm
Story Linux 4.8.2 Rianne Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 9:33pm
Story Linux 4.8.3 Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 3:25pm
Story Linux 4.8.4 Roy Schestowitz 22/10/2016 - 4:11pm
Story Linux 4.8.5 Rianne Schestowitz 28/10/2016 - 9:39pm

Tux Games to be at the UK Linux Expo

Filed under
Gaming

On the 25th and 26th of October, Tux Games will be at the UK Linux Expo where they will be giving away thousands of pounds worth of freebies, letting people play games for free at their stand, and selling the latest Linux games.

Novell, IBM partner on integrated Linux server stack

Filed under
Linux

Let's say you own a small to medium sized business, and you want to use Linux, but you're not crazy about the idea of mixing and matching software and servers. If that's you, Novell and IBM want to talk to you about their new Integrated Stack for SUSE Linux Enterprise.

Linux desktop driver woes: Laying blame, lobbying, coping

Filed under
Linux

Driver support is a sore spot, a very sore spot, for any organization using or considering a migration to Linux desktops. It's a pain for longtime Linux users too. In fact, many Linux desktop advocates, users and user wannabes say it is a rock-hard barrier to adoption.

EyeOS, an open source Web operating system

Filed under
OS

Web operating systems are essentially personal productivity environments implemented using Web browsers, AJAX, and other Rich Internet Application technologies with data and additional services being provided by a Web server.

The future of Debian Weekly News

Filed under
Linux

As you might have noticed, the Debian Weekly News has come to a stop as Martin "Joey" Schulze stopped working on it as a indirect consequence of Dunc-tank. The question is "now what"?

Logical partitioning in the System p5 environment

Filed under
Linux

Learn the basics of how to partition an IBM System p5 server. Logical partitioning (LPAR) is the ability to logically slice up a single system's CPU, memory, and other resources to create multiple and separate servers. Wouldn't it be nice to consolidate all of those servers onto just a few pieces of hardware to more fully utilize your resources and yet still maintain separate OS environments for each of the applications? With the IBM POWER5-based servers, you can do just that.

Review: Slackware goes to 11

Filed under
Reviews
Slack

Slackware Linux 11 was released at the beginning of this month, which marks 13 years of continued development. Slackware Linux, while not the first Linux distribution, is the oldest surviving one, and is starting to show signs of aging.

How to back up and restore your Ubuntu machine

Filed under
HowTos

There are many, many different ways to back up your Ubuntu system. Here we’re going to look at two of them, one of which is a full system backup and the other is a way to copy folders and files.

Opera goes on the hunt against fraud with 9.1

Filed under
Software

Opera announced today that it is joining the likes of Firefox 2 and IE 7 by including antiphishing technology in its web browser. Will it help stem the tide of online fraud?

Install XFCE Desktop in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Xfce is a lightweight desktop environment for unix-like operating systems. It aims to be fast and lightweight, while still being visually appealing and easy to use.Xfce is an easy-to-use and easy-to-configure environment for X11 based on GTK2. A priority is adherence to standards, specifically those defined at freedesktop.org.

Google Reader take 2: Not bad at all

Filed under
Google

The first version of Google's RSS reader, which debuted in October 2005, was so light on features that it was more of a curiosity than a serious application. Now the wizards in white coats at Google Labs have cooked up a new version. The almost completely reworked Google Reader includes a slew of new features and improvements that make the Web-based application a viable alternative to the existing desktop and online RSS readers.

Reiser's software work suffering after his arrest

Filed under
Reiser

Before he was arrested in connection with his wife's disappearance, Hans Reiser had gained a reputation as an innovative but controversial figure in the software development world.

Dumping Cisco for open-source

Filed under
OSS

The open-source movement, which has long made inroads into corporations via Linux and other enterprise-level software, now has a potentially bigger target in its cross hairs: the PBXs and network routers from companies such as Cisco Systems Inc. that form the basis of networking infrastructure.

Oracle-Ubuntu tie-up coming?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Christopher Kenyon, Canonical's business development manager, offered another crumb in a recent interview, when he said Oracle makes sure its 10G Express version works on Ubuntu.

Running A File-, Print-, Proxy-, DHCP-, AND Time-Server For Small/Medium Enterprises

Filed under
HowTos

This article shows how to run a file-, print-, HTTP proxy- DHCP-, and time server for small and medium enterprises (SME) on one single Debian Sarge system. It is very easy to set up, and management is done with an easy-to-use web interface called eBox so once the system is set up, you can forget about the command line. eBox was developed to administrate advanced services for corporate networks, and it was created for Debian Sarge.

http://www.howtoforge.com/debian_ebox

Three reasons to use KDE

Filed under
KDE

Sal Cangeloso’s writeup (three reasons to use GNOME) inspired me to talk about the flip side of the coin. Yes, I know it’s smug to pretend that there’s only KDE and GNOME; yet KDE is my desktop of choice, and here’s why. Of course, Sal’s right when he says lists are the effective way to convey information in writing, so I’ll take a page from his book and do so:

Upgrade Ubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) to Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft)

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu 6.10 is the current development version of the Ubuntu operating system. It is to be released in October 26th.The common name given to this release from the time of its early development was “Edgy Eft”. Today I have upgraded my Ubuntu Dapper Machine to Ubuntu Edgy this is still is beta version.

Writing documents with OpenOffice.org Writer

Filed under
HowTos

Everybody uses word processors, but very few people use them in the right way. Maybe it’s time you learned to use your word processor with... style!

Yamefa…another Linux Distribution?!

Filed under
Ubuntu

And so begins to take life another Linux distribution (french made) Yamefa, this time it is a KUbuntu based distribution.

New Samba Features Improve Interoperability

Filed under
Software

Columnist Eric Hall takes you through the newest release of Samba, the popular freeware program that allows end users to access and use files, printers, and other commonly shared resources on an intranet or via the Web.

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More in Tux Machines

'This was bigger than GNOME and bigger than just this case.' GNOME Foundation exec director talks patent trolls and much, much more

Patent assertion entities: do not pick a fight with open source. It won't end well for you. This is the message from GNOME Foundation executive director Neil McGovern, who will speak on the subject at the Open Source Summit Europe next week. McGovern talked to The Register ahead of the event on patents, Microsoft, and more. The open-source outfit develops the default desktop environment on major Linux distributions including Ubuntu and Red Hat. In late August 2019, Rothschild Patent Imaging filed a lawsuit against the GNOME foundation claiming that GNOME Shotwell, a photo manager, infringed one of its patents. “We didn't receive a letter before the court documents were filed or any sort of warning, it was just filed and then within a week there was a settlement request for $75,000,” McGovern told us. Read more

Debian Janitor: Hosters used by Debian packages

The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor. The Janitor knows how to talk to different hosting platforms. For each hosting platform, it needs to support the platform- specific API for creating and managing merge proposals. For each hoster it also needs to have credentials. At the moment, it supports the GitHub API, Launchpad API and GitLab API. Both GitHub and Launchpad have only a single instance; the GitLab instances it supports are gitlab.com and salsa.debian.org. This provides coverage for the vast majority of Debian packages that can be accessed using Git. More than 75% of all packages are available on salsa - although in some cases, the Vcs-Git header has not yet been updated. Of the other 25%, the majority either does not declare where it is hosted using a Vcs-* header (10.5%), or have not yet migrated from alioth to another hosting platform (9.7%). A further 2.3% are hosted somewhere on GitHub (2%), Launchpad (0.18%) or GitLab.com (0.15%), in many cases in the same repository as the upstream code. Read more Also: Multiple git configurations depending on the repository path

Benchmarks and Graphics Leftovers: x86, Zink, and Navi

  • Intel Core i7 1165G7 Tiger Lake vs. AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U Linux Performance

    For the Intel Tiger Lake Linux benchmarking thus far with the Core i7 1165G7 on the Dell XPS 13 9310 it's primarily been compared against the Ryzen 5 4500U and Ryzen 7 4700U on the AMD side since those are the only Renoir units within my possession. But a Phoronix reader recently provided me with remote access to his Lenovo ThinkPad X13 with Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U (8 cores / 16 threads) for seeing how the Tiger Lake performance compares against that higher-end SKU. Phoronix reader Tomas kindly provided SSH access to his ThinkPad X13 with Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U and 16GB of RAM. The Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U is quite close to the Ryzen 7 4800U with 8 cores / 16 threads but graphics capabilities in line with the 4700U. He's been quite happy with the ThinkPad X13 as a replacement to the Dell XPS 13 for business usage and has been running it with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on the Linux 5.8 kernel.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Catching Up

    A rare Saturday post because I spent so much time this week intending to blog and then somehow not getting around to it. Let’s get to the status updates, and then I’m going to dive into the more interesting of the things I worked on over the past few days. Zink has just hit another big milestone that I’ve just invented: as of now, my branch is passing 97% of piglit tests up through GL 4.6 and ES 3.2, and it’s a huge improvement from earlier in the week when I was only at around 92%. That’s just over 1000 failure cases remaining out of ~41,000 tests. For perspective, a table.

  • AMD 'Big Navi' 3DMark Firestrike results shared by HW testing firm

    The Linux specialists over at Phoronix have noticed that the AMD Linux driver has been tweaked to add support for a new graphics card dubbed the "navi10 blockchain SKU". It comments that the only visible difference in support for this card vs existing Navi 1X support, from the driver perspective, is that the patches disable the Display Core Next (DCN) and Video Core Next (VCN) support - basically creating a 'headless' Navi 1X graphics card. Cryprocurrency is showing signs of a resurgence in popularity and values, and some are worried that the latest and greatest GPUs from both Nvidia and AMD will be plucked from retailers even faster if they are viable mining platforms. It has been reported that AMD is trying to make sure retailers follow certain distribution practices with its upcoming Radeon RX 6000 series products, to make sure they are distributed to gamers and enthusiasts rather than scalpers and such like. An initiative like creating appealing crypto-specific Navi 1X products might help everyday consumers get their hands on a new Navi 2X graphics card too.

Does the Snap Store Use Too Much Memory?

This week I noticed that the Snap Store app on my Ubuntu 20.10 laptop uses a tonne of memory, even when it’s not running — we’re talking more memory than the main GNOME Shell process uses, and that is always running! Naturally I assumed something in my config was to blame. I do make heavy use of Snap apps — don’t worry I use plenty of Flatpak and PPAs too. I’m pretty polyamorous when it comes to packaging formats and I did install using an Ubuntu 20.10 daily build. Therein lay bugs. I know the caveats. All good. Don’t mind. Whatever. Read more