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Wednesday, 26 Feb 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

Module and dev kit unleash TI’s AM65x

Filed under
Android
Linux

Mistral’s “AM65x Industrial SoM” module runs Linux or Android on a quad -A53 TI AM6548 with support for TSN and industrial Ethernet protocols. Features include up to 4GB DDR4 and 32GB eMMC and a dev kit with 3x GbE ports.

Bangalore, India based Mistral has released a Linux-ready compute module and development kit that showcases Texas Instruments’ 1.1GHz, quad-core Cortex-A53 Sitara AM6548. This is only the second AM65x based product we’ve seen after Phytec’s phyCore-AM65x SOM.

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IBM, UN and Linux Foundation tackle climate crisis in 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS

For its 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge, IBM has partnered with United Nations Human Rights and the Linux Foundation to invite software developers and innovators worldwide to help fight climate change with open source powered technology.

"IBM has a long history of taking on the world's biggest challenges and we cannot think of a greater one today than climate change ," said IBM's Daniel Krook, chief technology officer for IBM's Call for Code.

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Distributions Were For Linux, Not For Kubernetes

Filed under
Linux

I often liken the Kubernetes revolution and the way it's taking over the cloud to Linux/Unix and the way it took over servers. I think we're right at the beginning of the same kind of revolution, and I'm not the only one who is seeing this trend, as evidenced by so many companies cropping up to capitalize on its growth.

Companies looking to make money in the world of Linux went out and took the core, bundled it up with their best practices and their favorite applications, and then sold it as a "distribution." You see this with Red Hat Linux, Ubuntu, etc. — even the open-source versions took the base system and then built significantly above and beyond that to the point where each had its own default windowing interface, and some were massively different experiences for the user even though what was underneath was basically the same.

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50 Simple and Useful dmidecode Commands for Linux

Filed under
Linux

The dmidecode command in Linux allows users to retrieve sensitive hardware-related information directly from the command line. This way, users can obtain useful information like serial numbers and processor cache values without taking apart their CPUs. In Linux, the dmidecode is known as the DMI table decoder, and it simply decodes hardware information from the SMBIOS (System Management BIOS) of your system. When used carefully, dmidecode can provide an extensive amount of interesting information. That’s why we have curated this guide outlining some of the most amazing things you could do with dmidecode. Continue reading to master these commands thoroughly.

Read more

How to Modify Groups in Linux With groupmod Command

Filed under
HowTos

Learn how to modify group properties like group name and group ID with the groupmod command in Linux.
Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Hands-On Lab: Oracle Linux Disk Encryption Using Network Based Key Services

    Many Linux environments require data to be encrypted at rest but that can add administrative overhead to the boot process. Oracle Linux has supported disk encryption since version 5 but a feature was added in 7 update 4 to allow the automatic unlocking of devices based on external network services. Network Bound Disk Encryption (NBDE) uses a network based key service to validate a system is on a trusted network and unlock encrypted disks upon boot. By combining NBDE and a keyboard entered passphrase the system will unlock a disk automatically during boot but allow administrators to use a passphrase during maintenance operations.

    A new hands-on lab Oracle Linux Disk Encryption Using Network Based Key Services is now available for anyone to learn the concepts of Linux disk encryption. The lab begins with the creation of a encrypted block device dependent on a passphrase and continues to an example of network based keys to unlock the device. Oracle Linux 8 is used but the same tools are available on Oracle Linux 7. The base components involved include dm-crypt which allows arbitrary block devices to be encrypted, Linux Unified Key Setup (LUKS) a disk encryption standard and cryptsetup which is used to configure our disks. We continue to include Tang, a network service that provides cryptographic services over HTTP and Clevis, an encryption framework. Clevis can use keys provided by Tang as a passphrase to unlock LUKS volumes.

  • Mir 1.7.1 Released With X11 Support Promoted Out Of "Experimental" Phase

    Most significant with Mir 1.7.1 is the X11 support being improved to the point that it's no longer considered experimental for running traditional X11 software atop Wayland. Passing --enable-x11 now can be used for enabling the X11 support rather than the prior "x11-display-experimental" option. Mir 1.7.1 saw a lot of work to the XWayland and X11 window manage code, including a new display FD option.

  • SUSE Manager 4 Brings the Power of DevOps to Your Enterprise Linux Environment

    DevOps is an IT management philosophy that requires speed, efficiency and confidence. A DevOps environment is constantly evolving: Containers spin up, new applications appear, tools are tested and updates happen—all without stoppages or significant downtime.

  • Liquid Prep, a solution that helps farmers optimize water usage during droughts, is now open source

    When a prolonged absence of water in a region leads to drought conditions, the entire ecosystem suffers. Among those hardest hit are farmers, and the impact on their land can have ripple effects on the larger population. These larger problems can range from health issues or food security, while also creating conditions that increase the risk of wildfires and dust storms.

    Created by five technologists from the IBM offices in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Liquid Prep is a solution designed for low-literate farmers in developing countries whose success hinges on access to advanced agricultural advice. By leveraging the use of an intuitive mobile Android app, local soil sensors, and weather forecast information as well as an advanced agricultural decision platform hosted on IBM Cloud, farmers are better informed on how to use limited water supplies and increase their chances of growing healthy crops for their small plots of land.

  • Linux-ready SBCs and mini-PCs run Ryzen Embedded, including new 8-10W R1305G

    Sapphire unveiled NP-FP5 and BP-FP5 SBCs with Ryzen V1000 and R1000 SoCs plus a G-series board, and Simply NUC revealed Red Oak (NP-FP5) and Post Oak (BP-FP5) mini-PCs based on the Ryzen SBCs. The NP-FP5 and Red Oak support AMD’s new 8-10W R1305G.

    At Embedded World, Sapphire Technology announced a pair of 4 x 4-inch (101.6 x 101.6mm) SBCs that run Linux or Win 10 on AMD’s x86-based Ryzen Embedded V1000 and R1000 SoCs. The dual 4K display NP-FP5 and more feature-rich, triple 4K display BP-FP5 SBCs support the same V1000 and R1000 models. The lower-end NP-FP5 also supports the low-power, 8-10W TDP R1305G, which was announced today by AMD along with a 6W R1102G.

  • Mirantis co-founder launches FreedomFi to bring private LTE networks to enterprises

    Boris Renski, the co-founder of Mirantis, one of the earliest and best-funded players in the OpenStack space a few years ago (which then mostly pivoted to Kubernetes and DevOps), has left his role as CMO to focus his efforts on a new startup: FreedomFi. The new company brings together open-source hardware and software to give enterprises a new way to leverage the newly opened 3.5 GHz band for private LTE and — later — 5G IoT deployments.

  • WordPress 5.4 Beta 3

    WordPress 5.4 Beta 3 is now available!

    This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

    [...]

    WordPress 5.4 is slated for release on March 31st, 2020, and we need your help to get there.

    Thanks to the testing and feedback from everyone who tested beta 2 (and beta 1) over 24 tickets have been closed in the past week.

  • Luis Villa: Surviving 2020 on Twitter

    At some point in the past few years, I accepted that I’m going to have a baseline level of anger about the state of the world, and that I have to focus on what I can change and let go of what I can’t. (Twitter anger is the latter.) So what can I change? Where is my anger productive?

    I’ve found that doing things offline—for me, mostly giving money—really helps. In particular, giving to causes that seek systemic (usually, that means political/government) change like 350.org and local activist groups, and giving a lot, and regularly. This, frankly, makes it a lot easier for me to ignore anger online — each new tweet is not likely to make me be more angry, or give more, because I’m already basically giving what I can. Being confident about that really reduced my FOMO when I started filtering aggressively.

    I hear from non-parents/non-startup-founders that physical-world activism (door-knocking, phone banking, local gov meeting-attending, etc.) can be great in this way too but sadly I can’t confirm Sad

    (I also want to acknowledge that, in the current state of the world, ‘letting go’ gets harder the less privilege you have. I have no great response to that, except to say that I empathize and am trying to fight for you where and how I can.)

  • Why Source Code Scanning Tools are Essential to Open Source Compliance [Ed: This promotes proprietary software of Microsoft 'proxies', along with FUD, to make proprietary software sales]

    There are many scanning tools and vendors to choose from. For example, Black Duck, WhiteSource, and FOSSA are well-known vendors that offer scanning tools on a subscription basis. FOSSology is an open source scanning tool maintained by the Linux Foundation, but it doesn’t come with a pre-populated library of open source code or software repository, which you would need to build on your own.

  • Google and Microsoft are scaring consumers over Edge extensions, and for what?

    Simply trying to install a Chrome extension via the Chrome Web Store actually requires navigating through several warnings, from both Google and Microsoft, about where to go to install an extension. The confusion and frustration this no doubt creates with users reflects poorly on both sides.

Rules for product managers at open source companies

Filed under
OSS

Product management is an interesting career. It's immensely rewarding to be the interface between users, business strategy, engineering, and product design. And it's also a highly lucrative career with increasing demand for ambitious and empathetic practitioners.

It's also a role with no single path. You might see various certifications and courses emerging to help address the serious skills shortage. The good news is that these are starting to contribute to the talent pipeline, but they struggle to address the wider demands of the role. This is especially the case where roles require direct experience across the enormous range of what it takes to build and ship successful products.

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How we decide when to release Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Open source projects can use a variety of different models for deciding when to put out a release. Some projects release on a set schedule. Others decide on what the next release should contain and release whenever that is ready. Some just wake up one day and decide it’s time to release. And other projects go for a rolling release model, avoiding the question entirely.

For Fedora, we go with a schedule-based approach. Releasing twice a year means we can give our contributors time to implement large changes while still keeping on the leading edge. Targeting releases for the end of April and the end of October gives everyone predictability: contributors, users, upstreams, and downstreams.

But it’s not enough to release whatever’s ready on the scheduled date. We want to make sure that we’re releasing quality software. Over the years, the Fedora community has developed a set of processes to help ensure we can meet both our time and and quality targets.

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Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Firefox Upgrade – Week 18

Filed under
Linux

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers.

I’ve previously looked at web browsing on the RPI4 in Week 4 of my blog, recommending Chromium and Vivaldi on this tiny machine. Chromium offers the virtue of official Raspbian support on the RPI4 and it’s published under an open source license. On the other hand, Vivaldi is no-charge proprietary software. Both web browsers earned my recommendation. At the time, I was unable to recommend Firefox because the Raspbian repositories hosted a prehistoric version; version 60.9.0 ESR to be specific. Running a version of a web browser that’s 2 years behind the latest version is totally unacceptable, even from a security standpoint alone.

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Zorin OS For Windows Users

Filed under
OS

Dear former Microsoft users, after Windows 7 (W7) officially discontinued early this year, how about looking at alternative operating system called Zorin OS? Zorin is computer operating system for everybody that is user-friendly and familiar. You can get Zorin gratis and free, you and your family can use without learning much, prepare to live peacefully without virus & antivirus, and you will be happy you can revive old computers with it. This article gives you sights on Zorin from perspective of a W7 user and see if you find it interesting. Enjoy Zorin!

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11 Linux commands I can’t live without

Filed under
Linux

Linux is an important part of our lives, especially as a system administrator. This article shares the Linux commands that I can’t live without. So, let’s begin...

So there you have it. Eleven Linux commands that most sysadmins can’t live without!

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100,000 Tweets

Filed under
Site News

@tuxmachines in Twitter
The @tuxmachines account in Twitter as of this morning

We have been on Twitter for nearly a decade. It's proprietary and centralised, but some of our audience comes from there. In the start of March we'll have posted our 100,000th tweet in Twitter. A milestone? Maybe for Twitter. We try to focus on our presence in Free/libre networks, such as Mastodon, Pleroma and Diaspora. We joined Pleroma a year ago and have more followers there than we have in Twitter. Spring is fast approaching, which means we soon turn 16.

Programming: C, Perl and Python

Filed under
Development
  • C Programming Examples on Linux for Beginners

    C programming language is one of the good choices for learning computer programming for the beginners. The basic programming logic can be learned easily by using C language as a first language. Java is considered as first programming language by some people, but I think, it is better to learn structured or procedural programming using C language before learning any object-oriented programming. The basic C programming on Linux is shown in this article by using different examples for the beginners.

  • Monitorix 3.12.0 released

    Another great Perl software that I find very useful is Monitorix.

    Monitorix is FOSS lightweight system monitoring designed to monitor as many services and system resources as possible.

    The tl;dr is that it works really well for monitoring stand alone machines- which is what I used it for. It's tracks all sorts of metrics with minimal configuration by me, and with packages for most distros its trivial to install and update.

  • Book review - Machine Learning with Python for Everyone, By Mark E. Fenner

    Machine learning, one of the hottest tech topics of today, is being used more and more. Sometimes as the best tool for the job, other times perhaps as a buzzword that is mainly used as a way to make a product look cooler. However, without knowing what ML is and how it works behind the scenes, it’s very easy to get lost. But this book does a great job in guiding you all the way up from very simple math concepts to some sophisticated machine learning techniques.

  • Python 3.8.2 and 3.9.0a4 are now available

    On behalf of the entire Python development community, and the currently serving Python release team in particular, I’m pleased to announce the release of two of the latest Python editions.

    Python 3.8.2

    Python 3.8.2 is the second maintenance release of Python 3.8 and contains two months worth of bug fixes. Detailed information about all changes made in 3.8.2 can be found in its change log. Note that compared to 3.8.1, version 3.8.2 also contains the changes introduced in 3.8.2rc1 and 3.8.2rc2.

  • Build Systems with Speed and Confidence by Closing the Loop First!

    A completely finished “loop” is when you can provide the required input to your system, and it produces the desired output (or side effects, if that’s how you like it). The “Close the loop first” technique is about closing this loop as fast as possible by creating a barebones version of it first, providing all or some required inputs, and generating a partial form of the desired output.

    Once we have closed this barebones loop, we can then begin implementing behaviours from the inside out, so that with each new change our loop starts looking more like the actual system we want.

    Sure, this is nothing new, right? We have all heard of this advice in various forms: build a proof of concept as quickly as possible; validate the unknowns first; if you want to deliver a car, deploy a skateboard first, etc. This is similar, but I am talking today purely from a “programming” point of view. In addition to helping you fail fast, “closing the loop” first also lets you build systems with more speed.

Mozilla: Facebook Container for Firefox, Issue Trackers, Securing Firefox with WebAssembly and Ad Hoc Profiling

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • The Facebook Container for Firefox

    Even with the ongoing #deletefacebook movement, not everyone is willing to completely walk away from the connections they’ve made on the social platform. After all, Facebook — and its subsidiary Instagram — is where the mountain biking club organizes rides, people post pet pics, dance moves catch on and life’s moments get shared with friends and family, near and far. Since the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke, Facebook has been greeted with more skepticism as it’s been under a hot spotlight on how it gathers, uses and gives access to our personal data for targeted advertising and manipulation, both on and off Facebook platforms. With recent news about their policy not to block false political ads, this targeting gets ever malicious.

  • Jira, Bugzilla, and Tales of Issue Trackers Past

    It seems as though Mozilla is never not in a period of transition. The distributed nature of the organization and community means that teams and offices and any informal or formal group is its own tiny experimental plot tended by gardeners with radically different tastes.

    And if there’s one thing that unites gardeners and tech workers is that both have Feelings about their tools.

    Tools are personal things: they’re the only thing that allows us to express ourselves in our craft. I can’t code without an editor. I can’t prune without shears. They’re the part of our work that we actually touch. The code lives Out There, the garden is Outside… but the tools are in our hands.

    But tools can also be group things. A shed is a tool for everyone’s tools. A workshop is a tool that others share. An Issue Tracker is a tool that helps us all coordinate work.

    And group things require cooperation, agreement, and compromise.

    While I was on the Browser team at BlackBerry I used a variety of different Issue Trackers. We started with an outdated version of FogBugz, then we had a Bugzilla fork for the WebKit porting work and MKS Integrity for everything else across the entire company, and then we all standardized on Jira.

  • Securing Firefox with WebAssembly

    Protecting the security and privacy of individuals is a central tenet of Mozilla’s mission, and so we constantly endeavor to make our users safer online. With a complex and highly-optimized system like Firefox, memory safety is one of the biggest security challenges. Firefox is mostly written in C and C++. These languages are notoriously difficult to use safely, since any mistake can lead to complete compromise of the program. We work hard to find and eliminate memory hazards, but we’re also evolving the Firefox codebase to address these attack vectors at a deeper level. Thus far, we’ve focused primarily on two techniques...

    [...]

    So today, we’re adding a third approach to our arsenal. RLBox, a new sandboxing technology developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the University of Texas, Austin, and Stanford University, allows us to quickly and efficiently convert existing Firefox components to run inside a WebAssembly sandbox. Thanks to the tireless efforts of Shravan Narayan, Deian Stefan, Tal Garfinkel, and Hovav Shacham, we’ve successfully integrated this technology into our codebase and used it to sandbox Graphite.

    This isolation will ship to Linux users in Firefox 74 and to Mac users in Firefox 75, with Windows support following soon after. You can read more about this work in the press releases from UCSD and UT Austin along with the joint research paper. Read on for a technical overview of how we integrated it into Firefox.

  • Nicholas Nethercote: Ad Hoc Profiling

    I have used a variety of profiling tools over the years, including several I wrote myself.

    But there is one profiling tool I have used more than any other. It is capable of providing invaluable, domain-specific profiling data of a kind not obtainable by any general-purpose profiler.

    It’s a simple text processor implemented in a few dozen lines of code. I use it in combination with logging print statements in the programs I am profiling. No joke.

Audiocasts/Shows: GNU/Linux and Python

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Going Linux #386 · Switching from OSX or macOS to Linux

    Episode 386 Time Stamps
    00:00 Going Linux #386 · Switching from OSX or macOS to Linux
    03:54 Where to look as a Mac user
    05:06 Ubuntu MATE
    06:16 Brave browser
    07:02 Elementary OS
    10:19 Zorin
    14:27 What is a PPA?
    15:38 Deepin
    19:40 Moving from Mac is easier than moving from Windows
    23:21 Let us know what you've tried
    25:03 Application pick: Brave browser
    27:18 goinglinux.com, goinglinux@gmail.com, +1-904-468-7889, @goinglinux, feedback, listen, subscribe
    28:21 End

  • Shrimps have SSHells | LINUX Unplugged 342

    A radical new way to do SSH authentication, special guest Jeremy Stott joins us to discuss Zero Trust SSH.

    Plus community news, a concerning issue for makers, an Arch server follow up, and more.

    Special Guests: Alex Kretzschmar, Brent Gervais, Martin Wimpress, and Neal Gompa.

  • Python Bytes: #170 Visualize this: Visualizing Python's visualization ecosystem
  • Talk Python to Me: #253 Moon base geekout

    This episode is a unique one. On this episode, I've invited Richard Campbell and developer and podcaster who also dives deep into science and tech topics. We are going to dig into his geekout series and spend some time talking realistically about moonbases and space travel.

    I think you're really going to enjoy the conversation. But I would love to hear, either way, if you like this minor diversion from pure Python topics (although we do talk some Python and programming). We can do more like this in the future if you all enjoy listening to these as much as I enjoyed making them.

Bosch Rexroth adopts Ubuntu Core and snaps for app-based ctrlX Automation platform

Filed under
Ubuntu

ctrlX Automation leverages Ubuntu Core, designed for embedded devices, and snaps, the universal Linux application containers, to deliver an open source platform to remove the barriers between machine control, operation technology and information technology, or OT-IT.

Industrial manufacturing solutions built on ctrlX Automation with Ubuntu Core and snaps will benefit from an open ecosystem, faster time to production and stronger security across devices’ lifecycle.

Through the use of an open architecture, industrial machine manufacturers selecting ctrlX Automation are freed from being tied to PLC specialists and proprietary systems with the software being decoupled from the hardware.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

50 Simple and Useful dmidecode Commands for Linux

The dmidecode command in Linux allows users to retrieve sensitive hardware-related information directly from the command line. This way, users can obtain useful information like serial numbers and processor cache values without taking apart their CPUs. In Linux, the dmidecode is known as the DMI table decoder, and it simply decodes hardware information from the SMBIOS (System Management BIOS) of your system. When used carefully, dmidecode can provide an extensive amount of interesting information. That’s why we have curated this guide outlining some of the most amazing things you could do with dmidecode. Continue reading to master these commands thoroughly. Read more

today's howtos

How to Modify Groups in Linux With groupmod Command

Learn how to modify group properties like group name and group ID with the groupmod command in Linux. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Hands-On Lab: Oracle Linux Disk Encryption Using Network Based Key Services

    Many Linux environments require data to be encrypted at rest but that can add administrative overhead to the boot process. Oracle Linux has supported disk encryption since version 5 but a feature was added in 7 update 4 to allow the automatic unlocking of devices based on external network services. Network Bound Disk Encryption (NBDE) uses a network based key service to validate a system is on a trusted network and unlock encrypted disks upon boot. By combining NBDE and a keyboard entered passphrase the system will unlock a disk automatically during boot but allow administrators to use a passphrase during maintenance operations. A new hands-on lab Oracle Linux Disk Encryption Using Network Based Key Services is now available for anyone to learn the concepts of Linux disk encryption. The lab begins with the creation of a encrypted block device dependent on a passphrase and continues to an example of network based keys to unlock the device. Oracle Linux 8 is used but the same tools are available on Oracle Linux 7. The base components involved include dm-crypt which allows arbitrary block devices to be encrypted, Linux Unified Key Setup (LUKS) a disk encryption standard and cryptsetup which is used to configure our disks. We continue to include Tang, a network service that provides cryptographic services over HTTP and Clevis, an encryption framework. Clevis can use keys provided by Tang as a passphrase to unlock LUKS volumes.

  • Mir 1.7.1 Released With X11 Support Promoted Out Of "Experimental" Phase

    Most significant with Mir 1.7.1 is the X11 support being improved to the point that it's no longer considered experimental for running traditional X11 software atop Wayland. Passing --enable-x11 now can be used for enabling the X11 support rather than the prior "x11-display-experimental" option. Mir 1.7.1 saw a lot of work to the XWayland and X11 window manage code, including a new display FD option.

  • SUSE Manager 4 Brings the Power of DevOps to Your Enterprise Linux Environment

    DevOps is an IT management philosophy that requires speed, efficiency and confidence. A DevOps environment is constantly evolving: Containers spin up, new applications appear, tools are tested and updates happen—all without stoppages or significant downtime.

  • Liquid Prep, a solution that helps farmers optimize water usage during droughts, is now open source

    When a prolonged absence of water in a region leads to drought conditions, the entire ecosystem suffers. Among those hardest hit are farmers, and the impact on their land can have ripple effects on the larger population. These larger problems can range from health issues or food security, while also creating conditions that increase the risk of wildfires and dust storms. Created by five technologists from the IBM offices in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Liquid Prep is a solution designed for low-literate farmers in developing countries whose success hinges on access to advanced agricultural advice. By leveraging the use of an intuitive mobile Android app, local soil sensors, and weather forecast information as well as an advanced agricultural decision platform hosted on IBM Cloud, farmers are better informed on how to use limited water supplies and increase their chances of growing healthy crops for their small plots of land.

  • Linux-ready SBCs and mini-PCs run Ryzen Embedded, including new 8-10W R1305G

    Sapphire unveiled NP-FP5 and BP-FP5 SBCs with Ryzen V1000 and R1000 SoCs plus a G-series board, and Simply NUC revealed Red Oak (NP-FP5) and Post Oak (BP-FP5) mini-PCs based on the Ryzen SBCs. The NP-FP5 and Red Oak support AMD’s new 8-10W R1305G. At Embedded World, Sapphire Technology announced a pair of 4 x 4-inch (101.6 x 101.6mm) SBCs that run Linux or Win 10 on AMD’s x86-based Ryzen Embedded V1000 and R1000 SoCs. The dual 4K display NP-FP5 and more feature-rich, triple 4K display BP-FP5 SBCs support the same V1000 and R1000 models. The lower-end NP-FP5 also supports the low-power, 8-10W TDP R1305G, which was announced today by AMD along with a 6W R1102G.

  • Mirantis co-founder launches FreedomFi to bring private LTE networks to enterprises

    Boris Renski, the co-founder of Mirantis, one of the earliest and best-funded players in the OpenStack space a few years ago (which then mostly pivoted to Kubernetes and DevOps), has left his role as CMO to focus his efforts on a new startup: FreedomFi. The new company brings together open-source hardware and software to give enterprises a new way to leverage the newly opened 3.5 GHz band for private LTE and — later — 5G IoT deployments.

  • WordPress 5.4 Beta 3

    WordPress 5.4 Beta 3 is now available! This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version. [...] WordPress 5.4 is slated for release on March 31st, 2020, and we need your help to get there. Thanks to the testing and feedback from everyone who tested beta 2 (and beta 1) over 24 tickets have been closed in the past week.

  • Luis Villa: Surviving 2020 on Twitter

    At some point in the past few years, I accepted that I’m going to have a baseline level of anger about the state of the world, and that I have to focus on what I can change and let go of what I can’t. (Twitter anger is the latter.) So what can I change? Where is my anger productive? I’ve found that doing things offline—for me, mostly giving money—really helps. In particular, giving to causes that seek systemic (usually, that means political/government) change like 350.org and local activist groups, and giving a lot, and regularly. This, frankly, makes it a lot easier for me to ignore anger online — each new tweet is not likely to make me be more angry, or give more, because I’m already basically giving what I can. Being confident about that really reduced my FOMO when I started filtering aggressively. I hear from non-parents/non-startup-founders that physical-world activism (door-knocking, phone banking, local gov meeting-attending, etc.) can be great in this way too but sadly I can’t confirm :( (I also want to acknowledge that, in the current state of the world, ‘letting go’ gets harder the less privilege you have. I have no great response to that, except to say that I empathize and am trying to fight for you where and how I can.)

  • Why Source Code Scanning Tools are Essential to Open Source Compliance [Ed: This promotes proprietary software of Microsoft 'proxies', along with FUD, to make proprietary software sales]

    There are many scanning tools and vendors to choose from. For example, Black Duck, WhiteSource, and FOSSA are well-known vendors that offer scanning tools on a subscription basis. FOSSology is an open source scanning tool maintained by the Linux Foundation, but it doesn’t come with a pre-populated library of open source code or software repository, which you would need to build on your own.

  • Google and Microsoft are scaring consumers over Edge extensions, and for what?

    Simply trying to install a Chrome extension via the Chrome Web Store actually requires navigating through several warnings, from both Google and Microsoft, about where to go to install an extension. The confusion and frustration this no doubt creates with users reflects poorly on both sides.