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Sunday, 20 Oct 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

deepin Linux 20 looks incredible

Filed under
Linux

I recently sold my MacBook Pro for a few reasons, but probably most importantly, macOS just wasn't wowing me anymore. While Apple's desktop operating system is good for basic users, it is far too limited for the more hardcore. Ultimately, I found my productivity was negatively impacted by macOS -- my workflow with Windows 10 and various Linux distributions was simply better.

Of course, with all of that said, macOS is much prettier than Windows 10 -- even Microsoft would confess to that. But is it more attractive than desktop Linux distributions? Well, that depends on the desktop environment. While there are plenty of beautiful DEs and launchers for Linux, only one really surpasses macOS in the looks department -- deepin.

Read more

New TenFourFox and Mozilla Firefox Team News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • TenFourFox FPR16 SPR1 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release "16.1" (SPR 1) is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). As noted, this is a pure security update and there are no user-facing changes; the big under-the-hood change of those is that we are now pulling entirely from 68ESR, including locale data, certificate roots and so forth. There is also a small update to the ATSUI font blacklist. Assuming no issues, it will go live Monday evening Pacific time as usual.

  • Chris H-C: Four-Year Moziversary

    We gained two new team members, Travis and Beatriz. And with Georg taking a short break, we’ve all had more to do that usual. Glean‘s really been working out well, though I’ve only had the pleasure of working on it a little bit.

    Instead I’ve been adding fun new features to Firefox Desktop like Origin Telemetry. I also gave a talk at a conference about Data and Responsibility. Last December’s All Hands returned us to Orlando, and June brought me to Whistler for the first time. We held a Virtual Work Week (or “vorkweek”) a couple of weeks ago when we couldn’t find a time and the budget to meet in person, and spent it planning out how we’ll bring Glean to Firefox Desktop with Project FOG. First with a Prototype (FOGotype) by end of year. And then 2020 will be the year of Glean on the Desktop.

Linux 5.4 Lands A Number Of Memory Management Fixes

Filed under
Linux

While mid-way through the Linux 5.4 development cycle with RC4 due out on Sunday, a number of memory management fixes just hit the mainline kernel.

Andrew Morton's pull request was merged on Friday night and he noted, "Rather a lot of fixes, almost all affecting mm/"

Indeed there were memory management fixes in this pull ahead of 5.4-rc4. Changes include a zRAM race condition fix, avoiding access to uninitialized memory maps, allow dropping transparent huge-pages (THP) from the page cache, and other fixes in this area including the possibility of a kernel crash.

Read more

Also: Intel's Cloud Hypervisor 0.3 Adds Block Device Offloading, Paravirtualized IOMMU

Programming: eMMC Flash, Compilers and Python

Filed under
Development
  • Some Tesla EV’s Control Screens Went Dark as Excessive Logging killed the eMMC Flash

    Despite wear-leveling techniques, eMMC flash memories tend to wear out over time as they have limited write cycles.

  • AMD Zen 2 Improvements For LLVM Have Been Held Up For Months By Code Review

    Back in February for LLVM Clang 9.0 was the initial AMD Zen 2 "znver2" enablement, but like the GCC support at the time it was the very basics. With time GCC picked up Zen 2 scheduler improvements and other work while sadly in the case of LLVM the improvements are still pending.

    Back in August, AMD's Ganesh Gopalasubramanian sent out the znver2 scheduler model for LLVM for Zen 2 CPUs but a focus on the EPYC 7002 "Rome" processors. "There are few improvements with respect to execution units, latencies and throughput when compared with znver1. The tests that were present for znver1 for llvm-mca tool were replicated. The latencies, execution units, timeline and throughput information are updated for znver2."

  • Python Add Lists

    This tutorial covers the following topic – Python Add lists. It describes various ways to join/concatenate/add lists in Python. For example – simply appending elements of one list to the tail of the other in a for loop, or using +/* operators, list comprehension, extend(), and itertools.chain() methods.

    Most of these techniques use built-in constructs in Python. However, the one, itertools.chain() is a method defined in the itertools module. You must also see which of these ways is more suitable in your scenario. After going through this post, you can evaluate their performance in case of large lists.

  • StackOverflow Report: (cxcix) stackoverflow python report

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install Chromium on Ubuntu using SNAP
  • 3D using Godot

    It is time for another installment of Godot (previous entries: introduction, 2D). This time, I have dived into the world of 3D. The goal is to recreate parts of an old time favorite: Kosmonaut. Something I remember playing a lot on my dad’s 286 with amazing EGA graphics.

    The state of the game when writing can be seen in the short screen capture below. This is more of a tech demo status than a full game at the moment, but I hope you will still find it interesting. You can also get the complete source code.

    [...]

    Once we have a world with a track (the grid map), we add a player to the scene (the yellow blob in the image above – I need to learn Blender to create a proper ship). The player scene contains the ship – and the camera. This means that the camera follows the player automatically – very convenient.

    The player script is responsible for this ship’s movements based on user input. Inputs can either be pressed for a long time, used for sideways movement, or just tapped (i.e. the release is ignored), used for jumping. Each of the inputs are mapped to a keyboard key (or other input device) in the Project Settings dialog, under the Input Map tab. This feels a bit awkward to me and makes me lose the feeling of flow – but I don’t know how to do it better.

  • How to install OpenOffice on Linux
  • How To Install Free SSL Certificate for Apache on CentOS 8
  • Install VirtualBox 6 on CentOS 8
  • How to Install Odoo 13 on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to Install Anaconda on Debian 10
  • Install Shutter Screenshot Tool via PPA in Ubuntu 19.10

Xfce 4.16 development phase starting

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In the 4.14 cycle we tried to do a 1:1 port of what used to be our Gtk2 desktop environment, avoiding visual changes. In the 4.16 cycle we plan to harmonize the appearance of certain elements that either became inconsistent through the port or already were inconsistent before (e.g. toolbars or inline toolbars).

We will also play with client-side decorations where we feel it makes sense (for instance replacing the so-called XfceTitledDialog, that is used for all settings dialogs with a HeaderBar version). Before anyone gets too excited (both positively or negatively): It is not planned to redesign more complex applications (like Thunar) with Headerbars in 4.16. We will however try to keep the experience and looks consistent, which means gradually moving to client side decorations also with our applications (please note that client side decorations are not the same as HeaderBars!). Through this change e.g. “dark modes” in applications will look good (see the part about the Panel below).

Now before there is a shitstorm about this change I would kindly ask everyone to give us time to figure out what exactly we want to change in this cycle. Also, switching to client-side decorations alone is not a big visual departure – feel free to also dig through the client-side decorations page if you want to read/see more on this.

Read more

GNU/Linux Distros on Distrotest

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Some New Operating Systems on Distrotest that Caught My Attention!

    Distrotest is one site that provides a variety of Linux distributions that can be run directly on the browser. Or you can also run it on a remote desktop client application, for example using Remmina. So, you can try various linux distributions online without having to install it or make a live CD.

    when I visited the distrotest. Apparently, there have been many new systems added. However, there are several new systems that caught my attention.

  • Forbes Raves Upcoming Linux Desktop Will 'Embarass' Windows 10 and macOS

    The article points out that Deepin is also a stand-alone desktop environment for any current Linux distribution -- and that it's one of the 248 operating systems available for online testing at DistroTest.net.

kwin-lowlatency 5.17 Brings A Better Experience To The KDE Desktop

Filed under
KDE

Following this week's release of KDE Plasma 5.17, a new release of the independent kwin-lowlatency code has been re-based against version 5.17.

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FreeBSD 12.1-RC2 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA256

The second RC build of the 12.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.1-RC2 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC2 i386 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC2 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.1-RC2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.1-RC2 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.1-RC2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC2 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.1-RC2 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.1-RC2 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.1-RC2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.1-RC2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.1-RC2 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.1-RC2 armv7 RPI2
o 12.1-RC2 armv7 PANDABOARD
o 12.1-RC2 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.1-RC2 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.1-RC2 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.1-RC2 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.1-RC2 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.1-RC2 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.1/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.1" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.1-RC1 includes:

o The loader.efi had been updated to use ioalign for compliance with
  UEFI specification 2.7A.

o A null pointer dereference bug had been fixed.

o A fix to SCTP to reset local variables to their initial values had
  been added.

o The ixgbe(4) driver had been updated to prevent a system crash when
  configuring EEE on X500EM_X devices.

o The sdhci(4) driver had been updated to fix a boot issue on Beaglebone
  SoCs.

A list of changes since 12.0-RELEASE is available in the releng/12.1
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/releases/12.1R/relnotes.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.1-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/12.1-RC2/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-0186d6a5fbc8766f2
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0b6bef3551f1b0f70
  eu-west-3 region: ami-062495360178ede5e
  eu-west-2 region: ami-0ccfe49c85e5f8cc0
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0e2730782e7462f98
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-053ddd72fc1feb00a
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-06cd2e1981334f254
  sa-east-1 region: ami-08acf6b9b1df41f34
  ca-central-1 region: ami-064249d804369c668
  ap-east-1 region: ami-020c406cb2f52030b
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-08264f040bf980098
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-0da02f500e46cac8f
  eu-central-1 region: ami-05458e84d05b820e8
  us-east-1 region: ami-06f6cbd134064befb
  us-east-2 region: ami-0cfe92105f4fee6a8
  us-west-1 region: ami-0bb63fac9c5ec153a
  us-west-2 region: ami-00a29b19544968928

FreeBSD/aarch64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-0ea4448b9b547107c
  ap-south-1 region: ami-07a9fd713466fe63f
  eu-west-3 region: ami-02e84241865e90f54
  eu-west-2 region: ami-0b707024f9aadb94f
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0abf12b852be4e776
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-086547036e5a47816
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-038017fcbf85e7669
  sa-east-1 region: ami-0da52f30dd7d86ef5
  ca-central-1 region: ami-092ee6a89213c15a2
  ap-east-1 region: ami-0db28099cf79bf65d
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0852402b94d58adf8
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-01f869cc877cef54f
  eu-central-1 region: ami-04d008006fdb7e720
  us-east-1 region: ami-0411db3e8715d4352
  us-east-2 region: ami-01e68c35d7ddcac3e
  us-west-1 region: ami-02dcdcd99bf7fde1f
  us-west-2 region: ami-09ce8334b595dff30

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-12.1-RC2
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 12.1-RC2

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 12.1-RC2 Has Update For UEFI 2.7A, Various Bug Fixes

Five best screen recorders for Linux

Filed under
Software

Screen recording comes in handy when creating a video tutorial, recording gameplay, live streaming or even something cool you just did and want to showcase it to others. Uses of a screen recorder are diverse and there are a ton of reasons to have one installed on your PC. In this article, we will provide a brief overview of five best screen recorders for Linux which include some basic as well as some advanced screen recorders.

Read more

Games: Stellaris, Crusader Kings III and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stellaris: Federations and Stellaris: Lithoids Species Pack announced at PDXCON

    PDXCON is now in full swing and the announcement are being handed out like candy. First up, Paradox Interactive and Paradox Development Studio have announced Stellaris: Federations and Stellaris: Lithoids Species Pack.

  • Crusader Kings III announced for release next year, to be more welcoming to new players

    As I suggested they would when setting Crusader Kings II permanently free (but not the DLC), Paradox Interactive have announced Crusader Kings III.

    "Crusader Kings III is a grand medieval simulator where you are free to live out any plausible ruler fantasy that we could think of - but not without challenge." says Henrik Fåhraeus, the Game Director. "Seeing its predecessor explode in popularity was very satisfying, especially considering that user friendliness was never our primary goal. Now we have a chance to address an even larger audience."

  • Prison Architect - Psych Ward: Warden's Edition expansion announced (plus another coming)

    I think we all saw this coming when Paradox Interactive picked up the rights to Prison Architect, with Double Eleven taking on further development. The first proper DLC has been announced at PDXCON named Prison Architect - Psych Ward: Warden's Edition.

    Psych Ward was previously a console exclusive DLC, so it's good to see it make it onto PC. However, it does include new added features not in the original DLC and it will launch along side a free content update for everyone. It's not exactly a small pack either, it actually sounds like it's going to be adding quite a bit to the game. Paradox also gave it a release date of November 21, so you won't exactly have long to wait to really find out.

  • BATTLETECH: Heavy Metal brings more classic 'Mechs and new weapon systems, releasing in November

    Even more news from PDXCON! Harebrained Schemes and Paradox Interactive have now properly announced the BATTLETECH: Heavy Metal expansion to bring more destruction.

  • Hearts of Iron IV: La Résistance expansion and a significant free update announced

    Paradox Development Studio and Paradox Interactive are expanding another of their grand-scale strategy games, with Hearts of Iron IV: La Résistance announced during PDXCON.

    Not just that, as they usually do they also confirmed a "significant" free content update will be released to all players. The free update will include a reworking of the resistance system, interface improvements to battleplans and air operations plus many other "quality of life improvements".

  • Bioshock 1 & 2 | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 19.04 | Steam Play

    Bioshock 1 & 2 running through Steam play.

  • Continuing the Counter-Strike 20th anniversary Valve put out skins, plus a possible Operation and update coming

    After starting off the celebration for Counter-Strike turning 20 back in June with the retro version of Dust II, Valve have now added a refreshed version of the map Cache and a themed Weapon Case and Sticker Capsule.

    We're expecting some bigger updates to come but let's go over what they've already done.

    [...]

    VNN's Tyler McVicker also released another of his highly speculative videos talking about lots of other things that could be pointing to a new operation. With a possible update coming that may include: custom Danger Zone modes, a new Danger Zone map, new Danger Zone weapons, co-op missions, hats and other wearable items, player taunts and more being speculated on.

    I personally hope Valve do put out a big update, since their celebration so far has been a bit lacklustre. An old map, a refreshed map and some skins you have to pay for. Not exactly big or exciting really so far. Speaking personally again, I'm still very much enjoying Danger Zone so if they do expand it again I will be quite pleased.

Theme Updates, Offline Upgrades Headline New Additions to Pop!_OS 19.10

Filed under
OS

Offline upgrades are now live on Pop!_OS 19.04, bringing faster, more reliable upgrades. When an upgrade becomes available, it is downloaded to your computer. Then, when you decide to upgrade to the newest version of your OS, the upgrade will overwrite the current version of your software. However, this is not to be confused with an automatic update; your OS will remain on the current version until you yourself decide to upgrade.

To upgrade to 19.10 from a fully updated version of Pop!_OS 19.04, open the Settings application and scroll down on the sidebar menu to the Details tab. In the About panel of the Details tab, you will see a button to download the upgrade. Once the download is complete, hit the button again to upgrade your OS. This will be the standard method of upgrading between Pop!_OS releases going forward.

Read more

Also: Pop!_OS 19.10 Released With Tensorman Tool For Tensorflow Management, GNOME 3.34

Leftovers: GNOME/GTK, Android-x86, Fedora, LibreOffice and More

Filed under
Misc
  • g_array_steal() and g_ptr_array_steal() in GLib 2.63.1

    Another set of new APIs in the upcoming GLib 2.63.1 release allow you to steal all the contents of a GArray, GPtrArray or GByteArray, and continue using the array container to add more contents to in future.

    This is work by Paolo Bonzini and Emmanuel Fleury, and will be available in the soon-to-be-released 2.63.1 release.

  • GNOME Shell Hackfest 2019

    This week, I have attended the GNOME Shell Hackfest 2019 held in Leidschendam, The Netherlands. It was a fantastic event, in a fantastic city! The list of attendees was composed of key members of the community, so we managed to get a lot done — a high amount of achievements for only three days of hackfest, in fact.

  • Android-x86: Run Android on your PC: Release Note 7.1-r3

    The Android-x86 project is glad to announce the release of 7.1-r3. This is the third stable release for Android-x86 7.1 (nougat-x86). The prebuilt images are available in the following site as usual:
    https://www.fosshub.com/Android-x86-old.html
    https://osdn.net/rel/android-x86/Release%207.1

    Key Features

    The 7.1-r3 is mainly a bugfixes release of 7.1-r2. It based on Android 7.1.2 Nougat MR2 security updates (android-7.1.2_r39). Some newer features are also back-ported from 8.1 release. We encourage users of 7.1-r2 or older release upgrade to this release.

  • David Cantrell: rpminspect-0.8 released (and a new rpminspect-data-fedora)

    Work on the test suite continues with rpminspect and it is finding a lot of corner-case type runtime scenarios. Fixing those up in the code is nice. I welcome contributions to the test suite. You can look at the tests/test_*.py files to see what I'm doing and then work through one inspection and do the different types of checks. Look in the lib/inspect_NAME.c file and for all of the add_result() calls to figure out what tests should exist in the test suite. If this is confusing, feel free to reach out via email or another means and I can provide you with a list for an inspection.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-42

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Fedora 31 was declared No-Go. We are currently under the Final freeze.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • New Feature in Libreoffice: Full-Sheet Previews

    The feature was developed on the cp-6.2 branch of LibreOffice code-base (which is basicly Collabora Office 6.2), and is already available in Collabora Office snaphots. And is being backported to LibreOffice master, so it will be also available in LibreOffice development builds and soon in the Collabora Office snapshots.

  • Rooting for ZFS | TechSNAP 414

    We dive into Ubuntu 19.10’s experimental ZFS installer and share our tips for making the most of ZFS on root.

    Plus why you may want to skip Nest Wifi, and our latest explorations of long range wireless protocols.

  • 2019-10-18 | Linux Headlines

    Researchers discover a kernel bug that can crash Linux devices, Fedora 31’s release date slips, Cedalo opens up its Streamsheets code, Google announces the Android NDK 21 beta, and Unix turns 50.

  • Google Launches A Refreshed Pixelbook Laptop At $649

    Say hello to a more affordable Chromebook that's lightweight and more fun to type on.

Proprietary Software, Games, Patent Traps/Tax and Openwashing

Filed under
Software
  • Adobe Announces Plan To Essentially Steal Money From Venezuelans Because It 'Has To' Due To US Sanctions

    Adobe has long had a history of questionable behavior, when it comes to the rights of its customers, and how the public is informed on all things Adobe. With the constant hammering on the concept that software it sells is licensed rather than purchased, not to mention with the move to more SaaS and cloud-based software, the company is, frankly, one of the pack leaders in consumers not actually owning what they bought.

  • Fantasy tactical RPG Wildermyth blends a mix of hand-painted 2D and 3D art & arrives on Steam soon

    With character art during the turn-based battles that look like paper cutouts in a 3D environment, Wildermyth certainly has a strange and lovely charm to it.

    Currently available on itch.io where users have been testing it for some time, Worldwalker Games have now announced that their character-driven tactical RPG will enter Early Access on Steam on November 13. In Wildermyth, your party will be tasked with defending the lands from various threats, switching between the turn-based combat and making decisions on the over-world map. It has choice-based comic-styled events, which can end up changing your heroes' appearance, personalities, relationships, and abilities.

  • Paragon Looks To Upstream Their Microsoft exFAT Driver For The Linux Kernel

    With the upcoming Linux 5.4 kernel release there is now an exFAT file-system driver based on an old Samsung code drop of their exFAT driver support for mobile devices. This comes after Microsoft made the exFAT specification public recently and gave their blessing for a native Linux driver for the file-system. The Linux developers acknowledge though the current exFAT code is "horrible" and a "pile of crap" but is within the staging area.

    So in Linux 5.4's staging is this preliminary read-write driver for exFAT that continues to be cleaned up and further improved upon. Meanwhile there is also another out-of-tree exFAT Linux driver based on Samsung's sdFAT code that is said to be in better shape than the mainline code. But now there's another option with Paragon Software wanting to upstream their own exFAT driver into the Linux kernel.

  • VMware’s Joe Beda: Enterprise Open Source Is Growing [Ed: “Enterprise Open Source” means proprietary software and openwashing for marketing purposes]

    One of the fathers of Kubernetes says enterprise customers see the most benefit from the community-driven approach because their users get the opportunity to influence the direction development takes.

Linux Devices/Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Site.js and Pi

    Chatting about Pi, on a Pi, with a chat server running on Site.js on the same Pi.

  • This MicroATX Motherboard is Based on Phytium FT2000/4 Arm Desktop SoC @ 3.0 GHz
  • Rikomagic R6 Review – Part 1: Android Mini Projector’s Unboxing and First Boot

    Rikomagic R6 is a mini Android projector that looks like a vintage radio, or depending on your point of view a mini vintage television.

  • Brief on Behalf of Amicus Curiae Open Source Hardware Association in Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc., No. 18-2214 (Fed. Cir.)

    Curver Luxembourg, SARL v. Home Expressions Inc. is a case of first impression for the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The question on appeal is whether a design patent’s scope is tied to the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent.

    In this amicus brief, the Open Source Hardware Association (“OSHWA”) explains the potential effects on open source hardware development, and design practice generally, of untethering design patent protection from the article of manufacture disclosed in the patent. A large percentage of open-source hardware combines both ornamental and functional elements, and industrial design routinely involves applying design concepts from disparate fields in novel ways. To engage in this practice, open-source hardware designers need to know the universe of available source material and its limits. Further, understanding the licensing requirements of open-source hardware begins with understanding how the elements that make up that hardware may or may not be protected by existing law. Accordingly, while many creators of open-source hardware do not seek patent protection for their own creations, an understandable scope of design patent protection is nonetheless essential to their ability to collaborate with other innovators and innovate lawfully.

    The brief argues that the District Court in the case—and every district court that has considered the issue—correctly anchored the patented design to the article of manufacture when construing the patent. The brief explains that anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture is the best approach, for several reasons. Connecting the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture calibrates the scope of design patent protection to the patentee’s contribution over the prior art. It avoids encumbering the novel and nonobvious application of prior designs to new articles of manufacture, a fundamental and inventive practice of industrial design. It aligns the scope of design patent protection with its purpose: encouraging the inventive application of a design to an article of manufacture. This balances protection for innovative designs with later innovators’ interest in developing future designs. Finally, anchoring the patented design to the disclosed article of manufacture helps fulfill design patent law’s notice function by clarifying the scope of protection.

Graphics: Gallium3D and AMDGPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Gallium3D's Mesa State Tracker Sees "Mega Cleanup" For NIR In Mesa 19.3

    AMD developer Marek Olšák has landed a "mega cleanup" to the Gallium3D Mesa state tracker code around its NIR intermediate representation handling.

    As part of getting the NIR support in good enough shape for default usage by the RadeonSI driver, Marek has been working on a number of clean-ups involving the common Gallium / Mesa state tracker code for NIR.

  • AMDGPU DC Looks To Have PSR Squared Away - Power-Savings For Newer AMD Laptops

    It looks like as soon as Linux 5.5 is where the AMDGPU kernel driver could be ready with Panel Self Refresh (PSR) support for enabling this power-savings feature on newer AMD laptops.

    While Intel's Linux driver stack has been supporting Panel Self Refresh for years, the AMD support in their open-source Linux driver code has been a long time coming. We've seen them working towards the support since Raven Ridge and now it appears the groundwork has been laid and they are ready to flip it on within the Display Core "DC" code.

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos
  • CentOS 8 Package Management with DNF on the Command Line
  • AdamW’s Debugging Adventures: “dnf is locked by another application”
  • Managing user accounts with Cockpit
  • Download Ubuntu 19.10 ISO image to install on VirtualBox VM
  • GNU poke: Dealing with alternatives - Unions in Poke

    Computing with data whose form is not the most convenient way to be manipulated, like is often the case in unstructured binary data, requires performing a preliminary step that transforms the data into a more convenient representation, usually featuring a higher level of abstraction. This step is known in computer jargon as unmarshalling, when the data is fetch from some storage or transmission media or, more generally, decoding.

    Once the computation has been performed, the result should be transformed back to the low-level representation to be stored or transmitted. This is performed in a closing step known as marshalling or, more generally, encoding.

    Consider the following C program whose purpose is to read a 32-bit signed integer from a byte-oriented storage media at a given offset, multiply it by two, and store the result at the same offset.

  • Android NDK r21 moves to beta

    Android announced that NDK r21 is now in beta. Android NDK is a toolset for implementing parts of an app in native code. The release — which is the first long term support release — includes improved defaults for better security and performance.

    One of the key features in the release is an update to GNU Make to version 4.2, which provides a number of bug fixes, and enables ‘–output-sync’ to avoid interleaving output with error messages, the team explained. This is enabled by default with ndk-build.

    Additionally, GDB, the GNU project debugger, has been updated to version 8.3, which includes fixes for debugging modern Intel CPUs.

  • What is the history behind C Programming and Unix?

    If you think C programming and Unix are unrelated, then you are making a big mistake. Back in the 1970s and 1980s, if the Unix engineers at Bell Labs had decided to use another programming language instead of C to develop a new version of Unix, then we would be talking about that language today.

    The relationship between the two is simple; Unix is the first operating system that is implemented with a high-level C programming language, got its fame and power from Unix. Of course, our statement about C being a high-level programming language is not true in today’s world.

    This article is an excerpt from the book Extreme C by Kamran Amini. Kamran teaches you to use C’s power. Apply object-oriented design principles to your procedural C code. You will gain new insight into algorithm design, functions, and structures. You’ll also understand how C works with UNIX, how to implement OO principles in C, and what multiprocessing is.

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