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8 of the worst open source innovations of the decade

Filed under
OSS

Over the years, Linux and open source have been a master class on slow burn success. From out of nothing, Linux has become the champion of the cloud, IoT, and containers. And although it hasn't reached the "world domination" status it swore in the early 2000s, Linux desktop is still very much alive and building momentum.

But that doesn't mean it's been all success; in fact, there have been a few stumbles along the way. Let's take a look at some of the worst open source failures of the decade.

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9 of the biggest open source stories in 2019

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OSS

The year is 2019. Although cries of "world domination" still echo in the hallowed halls of Linux land, everyone knows this great event will have to wait for another year, but that doesn't mean all those who are invested in open source need to hang their heads in shame. Failure was never an option, and it wasn't an issue--not in the year of subtle takeover.

If I have to give 2019 a title for open source, it is just that--subtle takeover. Why? Because subtle things happened, many of which will have reverberations for years to come.

Let's take a look at the some of the moments that defined the year for Linux and open source.

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Heroku Review apps available for Treeherder

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF

In bug 1566207 I added support for Heroku Review Apps (link to official docs). This feature allows creating a full Treeherder deployment (backend, frontend and data ingestion pipeline) for a pull request. This gives Treeherder engineers the ability to have their own deployment without having to compete over the Treeherder prototype app (a shared deployment). This is important as the number of engineers and contributors increases.

Once created you get a complete Heroku environment with add-ons and workers configured and the deployment for it.

Looking back, there are few new features that came out of the work, however, Heroku Review apps are not used as widely as I would have hoped for.

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Linux-driven RISC-V core to debut on an NXP i.MX SoC

Filed under
Linux

The OpenHW Group unveiled a Linux-driven “CORE-V Chassis” eval SoC due for tape-out in 2H 2020 based on an NXP i.MX SoC, but featuring its RISC-V-and PULP-based 64-bit, 1.5GHz CV64A CPU and 32-bit CV32E cores. Meanwhile, Think Silicon demonstrated a RISC-V-based NEOX|V GPU.

A not-for-profit, open source RISC-V initiative called the OpenHW Group that launched in June has announced that it plans to tape out a Linux-friendly CORE-V Chassis evaluation SoC in the second half of 2020 built around its 64-bit CV64A CPU core and 32-bit CV32E coprocessor. The RISC-V based cores will be integrated into an undefined, NXP i.MX heterogeneous, multi-core SoC design. The SoC was announced at this week’s RISC-V Summit in San Jose, Calif., where Think Silicon also demo’d an early version of a RISC-V-based NEOX|V GPU (see farther below).

The open source CV64A CPU core and 32-bit CV32E are based on RISC-V architecture PULP Platform cores developed by the University of ETH Zurich. The 64-bit CV64A core is based on ETH Zurich’s Ariane implementation of its RV64GC RISC-V core IP. RV64GC is also used by many other RISC-V projects, including SiFive’s U54.

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today's howtos and leftovers

Filed under
Misc
HowTos

Juju 2.7: Enhanced k8s experience, improved networking and more

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Ubuntu

Canonical is proud to announce the availability of Juju 2.7. This new release introduces a range of exciting features and several improvements which enhance Juju across various areas.

To learn more about Juju, visit our page.

Kubernetes extensions

Juju is becoming the simplest way to deploy and manage your container-centric workloads. This release was aimed at bringing more Juju features to k8s charms and more k8s features to Juju.

K8s charms can now define actions, introspect agents, and communicate back to Juju via the addition of juju-run within the pod’s PATH environmental variable. Experienced k8s operators will feel more at home with the ability to set secrets, administer service accounts, and other k8s-native features from their charms directly.

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Also: How using Charmed OSM helps telcos to accelerate their NFV transformation

Graphics: NVIDIA 440.44 Linux Driver, Microsoft Code, and WSL Performs Very Poorly

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 440.44 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, __GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE Honored With Vulkan

    Out today is NVIDIA 440.44 as the latest stable Linux driver update in their new long-lived driver series. 

    Succeeding the 440.36 and 440.31 stable drivers, the 440.44 release isn't too exciting but at least NVIDIA should be introducing a new beta series shortly. 

  • Intel's OpenSWR OpenGL Software Rasterizer Pulls In Tessellator From Microsoft Direct3D Code

    OpenSWR is Intel's performance-minded software rasterizer for purposes like workstation visualizations and is where it outperforms the likes of LLVMpipe. This CPU-based OpenGL implementation can make use of not only AVX/AVX2 but also AVX-512 and other optimizations to support speedy CPU-based GL operations from laptops to Xeon Scalable hardware. Like LLVMpipe, OpenSWR does leverage LLVM in part. Those unfamiliar with this long-standing Intel open-source project can learn more at OpenSWR.org.

  • Windows Subsystem For Linux Performance At The End Of 2019

    Recently I wrapped up some benchmarks looking at the performance of Ubuntu on Microsoft's Windows Subsystem for Linux comparing WSL on Windows 10 Build 18362 (May 2019 Update) and then both WSL and WSL2 performance using the Windows 10 Build 19008 Insider's Preview (what will come as Windows 10 20H1 update) for looking at where the WSL performance is heading. Additionally, looking at the bare metal performance of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS for which the WSL instances were based plus Ubuntu 19.10. As well, for the Windows-compatible tests also looking at how the Windows performance itself was outside of WSL/WSL2.

Testing IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 139 and Latest Security Patches

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Security
  • IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 139 is available for testing

    the last Core Update for this decade is finally available for testing! If you have a couple of hours free over the holidays, please help us out by installing it and sending us your feedback!

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (crypto++ and thunderbird), Debian (cacti, freeimage, git, and jackson-databind), Fedora (nss), openSUSE (clamav, dnsmasq, munge, opencv, permissions, and shadowsocks-libev), Red Hat (nss, nss-softokn, nss-util, rh-maven35-jackson-databind, and thunderbird), Scientific Linux (nss, nss-softokn, nss-util, nss-softokn, and thunderbird), SUSE (caasp-openstack-heat-templates, crowbar-core, crowbar-openstack, crowbar-ui, etcd, flannel, galera-3, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, openstack-dashboard-theme-SUSE, openstack-heat-templates, openstack-neutron, openstack-nova, openstack-quickstart, patterns-cloud, python-oslo.messaging, python-oslo.utils, python-pysaml2, libssh, and strongswan), and Ubuntu (git, libpcap, libssh, and thunderbird). 

Mozilla and Beyond: Daniel Stenberg on BearSSL, Mozilla Root Store Policy, The Weak Notes, Wladimir Palant on Avira

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
  • Daniel Stenberg: BearSSL is curl’s 14th TLS backend

    curl supports more TLS libraries than any other software I know of. The current count stops at 14 different ones that can be used to power curl’s TLS-based protocols (HTTPS primarily, but also FTPS, SMTPS, POP3S, IMAPS and so on).

    The beginning

    The very first curl release didn’t have any TLS support, but already in June 1998 we shipped the first version that supported HTTPS. Back in those days the protocol was still really SSL. The library we used then was called SSLeay. (No, I never understood how that’s supposed to be pronounced)

    The SSLeay library became OpenSSL very soon after but the API was brought along so curl supported it from the start.

  • Announcing Version 2.7 of the Mozilla Root Store Policy

    After many months of discussion on the mozilla.dev.security.policy mailing list, our Root Store Policy governing Certificate Authorities (CAs) that are trusted in Mozilla products has been updated. Version 2.7 has an effective date of January 1st, 2020.

  • Week notes - 2019 w49 - worklog - The Weak Notes

    A week with a bad cold makes it more difficult to write week notes. So here my weak notes. Everything seems heavier to type, to push.

    This last week-end I was at JSConf JP. I wrote down some notes about it.

    The week starts with two days of fulltime diagnosis (Monday, Tuesday). Let's get to it: 69 open bugs for Gecko. We try to distribute our work across the team so we are sure that at least someone is on duty for each day of the week. When we have finished our shift, we can add ourselves for more days. That doesn't prevent us for working on bugs the rest of the week. Some of the bugs take longer.

  • Problematic monetization in security products, Avira edition

    A while back we’ve seen how Avast monetizes their users. Today we have a much smaller fish to fry, largely because the Avira’s extensions in question aren’t installed by default and require explicit user action for the additional “protection.” So these have far fewer users, currently 400 thousands on Firefox and slightly above a million on Chrome according to official add-on store numbers. It doesn’t make their functionality any less problematic however.

    That’s especially the case for Avira Browser Safety extension that Avira offers for Firefox and Opera. While the vendor’s homepage lists “Find the best deals on items you’re shopping for” as last feature in the list, the extension description in the add-on stores “forgets” to mention this monetization strategy. I’m not sure why the identical Chrome extension is called “Avira Safe Shopping” but at least here the users get some transparency.

    [...]

    The Avira Browser Safety extension is identical to Avira Safe Shopping and monetizes by offering “best shopping deals” to the users. This functionality is underdocumented, particularly in Avira’s privacy policy. It is also risky however, as Avira chose to implement it in such a way that it will execute JavaScript code from Avira’s servers on arbitrary websites as well as in the context of the extension itself. In theory, this allows Avira or anybody with control of this particular server to target individual users, spy on them or mess with their browsing experience in almost arbitrary ways.

    In addition to that, the security part of the extension is implemented in a suboptimal way and will upload the entire browsing history of the users to Avira’s servers without even removing potentially sensitive data first. Again, Avira’s privacy policy is severely lacking and won’t make any clear statements as to what happens with this data.

RISC-V based PolarFire SoC FPGA and Devkit Coming in Q3 2020

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Microsemi unveiled PolarFire FPGA + RISC-V SoC about one year ago, but at the time, development was done on a $3,000 platform with SiFive U54 powered HiFive Unleashed board combined with an FPGA...

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News From Python Programmers

Filed under
Development
  • Data Engineer Interview Questions With Python

    Going to interviews can be a time-consuming and tiring process, and technical interviews can be even more stressful! This tutorial is aimed to prepare you for some common questions you’ll encounter during your data engineer interview. You’ll learn how to answer questions about databases, Python, and SQL.

  • 8 AI Predictions for 2020: Business Leaders & Researchers Weigh In

    The first industrial revolution was powered by coal, the second by oil and gas, and the third by nuclear power. The fourth — AI — is fueled by an abundance of data and breakthroughs in compute power. While this abundance has allowed us to make significant progress in recent years, there is still much to be done for AI to be the positive life-changing force that many hope it will be. We asked thought leaders at the forefront of AI and machine learning technology to contribute some insight into what they think will transpire in 2020. Their predictions center around hardware, the human impact of AI, the public’s understanding of AI, and its limitations.

  • The easiest way to deploy Django application

    Heroku is a cloud application platform, it facilitate the deployement of a web application.

    They support several programming languages, include Python.

  • Encoding and Decoding Base64 Strings in Python

    Have you ever received a PDF or an image file from someone via email, only to see strange characters when you open it? This can happen if your email server was only designed to handle text data. Files with binary data, bytes that represent non-text information like images, can be easily corrupted when being transferred and processed to text-only systems.

    Base64 encoding allows us to convert bytes containing binary or text data to ASCII characters. By encoding our data, we improve the chances of it being processed correctly by various systems.

    In this tutorial, we would learn how Base64 encoding and decoding works, and how it can be used. We will then use Python to Base64 encode and decode both text and binary data.

Red Hat and IBM Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • MicroProfile 3.2 is now available on Open Liberty in Red Hat Runtimes

    Open Liberty 19.0.0.12 provides support for MicroProfile 3.2, allowing users to provide their own health check procedures and monitor microservice applications easily with metrics. Additionally, updates allow trust to be established using the JDK’s default truststore or a certificate through an environment variable.

    [...]

    Open Liberty has added support for Jaeger in MicroProfile OpenTracing. A sample tracer is available for using Zipkin as a tracing backend. With the addition of Jaeger support, developers can also use Jaeger as a tracing backend.

  • Working with Linux containers on RHEL 8 with Podman, image builder and web console

    Podman was released with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 and 8.0 as the next generation of Linux container tools, is designed to allow faster experimentation and development of features.

    Podman features include rootless, kube generate, and kube play (see: "Podman can now ease the transition to Kubernetes and CRI-O"). Podman is also compatible with the Open Containers Initiative (OCI), Runtime, Image, and Distribution specifications, so customers can build container images that run on OpenShift (which uses CRI-O) or other 3rd-party OCI compliant container engines, and vice versa.

    As can be seen in Figure 1, CRI-O, in Red Hat OpenShift, shares many of its underlying components with Podman. This allows Red Hat engineers to leverage knowledge gained in experiments conducted in Podman for new capabilities in OpenShift.

  • Red Hat Software Collections 3.4, Red Hat Developer Toolset 9 now generally available

    Building the next generation of enterprise applications requires the latest and greatest developer tools paired with production-grade stability. To help meet these twin needs, we’re pleased to deliver the latest version of Red Hat’s curated collection of the latest open source runtime languages, databases, compilers and related developer tools: Red Hat Software Collections 3.4.

  • Celebrating 20 years of enterprise Java: Innovation

    Twenty years ago this week, enterprise Java was born. The Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) launched as version 1.2 on Dec. 12, 1999. It built upon many years of work previously in the enterprise distributed systems arena, such as the common object request broker architecture (CORBA) and distributed computing environment (DCE), and its birth marked the beginning of a technology that would become a powerhouse in the world of enterprise application development.

    Building on the "write once, run anywhere" promise of the Java programming language, the enterprise Java platform extends this neutrality and portability with a set of specifications that are well-suited for building large scale applications. As a result, enterprise Java has been able to offer an appealing option for developers that enables them to take advantage of the reliability, speed, efficiency and ease-of-use needed for enterprise-grade development.

  • Keycloak: Core concepts of open source identity and access management

    Keycloak provides the flexibility to export and import configurations easily, using a single view to manage everything. Together, these technologies let you integrate front-end, mobile, and monolithic applications into a microservice architecture. In this article, we discuss the core concepts and features of Keycloak and its application integration mechanisms. You will find links to implementation details near the end.

  • What 5 new innovations will open source yield in the 2020s?

    When I look back to where technology was in 2010, it’s astounding to think about how much has changed — and how so many of those advancements were fueled by open source.

    Ten years ago, AI was not a part of our everyday lives, most developers hadn’t even heard of containers or microservices, blockchain was little more than an idea, and serverless was a far-off dream. Now these technologies, built on open source projects and the communities that surround them, are shaping how developers do their jobs and how people interact with technology on a daily basis.

    In this blog post, I talk about some of the trends that have shaped the past decade as we look forward to what 2020 — and the next decade — has in store for us.

  • Open and Innovative: others don’t have a patch on SUSE

    It’s not just general purpose and large x86_64 systems that feel the benefit of fixing vulnerable systems without waiting for a planned maintenance window. We see so many customers in the SUSE world that run critical applications or large database instances on IBM POWER. In many cases these systems do not have the same levels of flexibility built into general purpose systems, and so every minute of downtime hurts.
    SUSE Linux Enterprise Live Patching has supported live patching on the POWER systems for almost 2 years now. This is just another example of SUSE always listening to the user community and delivering to them what the users really need and when they need. Customers know and depend on SUSE to be the first to deliver the right technology at the right time.

Audiocasts/Shows: Talk Python to Me, Art With Free Software and mintCast on Linux Mint

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Talk Python to Me: Episode #242: Your education will be live-streamed

    Online education has certainly gone mainstream. Developers and companies have finally gotten comfortable taking online courses. Sometimes these are recorded, self-paced courses like we have at Talk Python Training. Other times, they are more like live events in webcast format.

    In this episode, you'll meet two guys who are taking the interactivity of online learning up a notch. Brian Clark and Cecil Philip run a weekly event on Twitch where they are live-streaming an interactive Python course. They take questions from 100's of students and dig into the diversions more mainstream online learning simply cannot.

  • [Krita artist] Production report: episode 31

    Slowly but surely and in the background of the book-publishing project I've been working on a future episode of Pepper&Carrot. Here is a report about that with many screenshots:

  • mintCast 323.5 – Traveling Networker Problem

    In our Innards section, we talk more about Linux Mint and Clem’s comments.

Fedora 31 Workstation review - The color of winter

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Last week, we talked about MX Linux MX-19. This week, let's have a look at Fedora 31. Now, some of you may already start grumbling and complaining. Because I will focus a lot of my energy on the Gnome desktop and what it doesn't do, and all that. But then, Fedora is the pioneer child (not in the communist sense) of the Gnome world, showcasing the latest fixes and features the environment offers. Therein lies my hope and my expected but hopefully proven wrong disappointment.

Looking back to the past two years or so, I found Fedora to have improved a little in the performance area, has become more consistent, gained stability in major areas side by side with bugs and problems in others, and still isn't user-friendly enough for immediate consumption. Y'know, proprietary stuff, window buttons, desktop icons, stuff like that. Fedora 30 is a good melting pot of all these observations. I wasn't happy, but then, it's time to rewind the clock, reset my emotions, and boldly charge head first into the wall of open-source.

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Games: Hellpoint, Wasteland 2 Director's Cut, Bite the Bullet, Steam Play Proton

Filed under
Gaming
  • Hellpoint, the dark sci-fi action RPG from Cradle Games now launching in 2020 with new details

    Cradle Games recently put out some fresh exciting details for Hellpoint, their upcoming crowdfunded dark sci-fi action RPG.

    Firstly, it seems the release has been pushed back a while. They were aiming for this year but they're just not going to hit it. They've been going through console certification, along with doing regular updates to the PC Beta and they're now saying it's going to be sometime in "Q1 2020" for Hellpoint's release.

  • Get Wasteland 2 Director's Cut FREE in the GOG Winter Sale, lots of Linux games going cheaps

    Is there seriously another big sale going on already? Yep! This time it comes with a FREE game too. GOG are offering Wasteland 2 Director's Cut at no cost.

    Firstly then, the Wasteland 2 Director's Cut Digital Classic Edition going FREE on GOG which also comes with Wasteland 1: The Original Classic so you're getting two games for nothing here. That should keep you busy enough through the colder Winter nights.

  • Action-RPG platform shooter Bite the Bullet is going to have some really crazy weapons

    Mega Cat Studios previously showed how eating enemies in Bite the Bullet would power you up, now they're talking about the varied weapons you get to play with.

    As a huge fan of Broforce and other such crazy action platformers, Bite the Bullet is high up on my list of games coming out next year. We shouldn't be waiting too long on it, with it due in the first quarter of 2020. To show it off a little more, Mega Cat Studios have a new video talking about all the weapons and some of them are pretty crazy.

  • Another Steam Beta is out, updates the Linux Runtime to help Steam Play Proton

    Quite a small update to the Steam Beta recently, but for some Linux gamers using Steam Play Proton it might be a rather helpful one.

    The new Library got tweaked a little again, now allowing for Family Sharing of tools, Valve also fixed new categories created in small mode or Big Picture mode not being properly saved when switching to normal mode and recently played but disallowed by Family View games not appearing in the Recent Games shelf when Family View is enabled on startup.

Debian: ElkArte, LTS and riscv64 Port

Filed under
Debian
  • How to Install ElkArte Forum with Apache and Let's Encrypt on Debian 10

    ElkArte is a free, open-source and powerful forum software that allows you to create your own online forum community. In this tutorial, we will explain how to install ElkArte on Debian 10 server.

  • My Free Software Activities in November 2019

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Debian GNU/Linux riscv64 port -- Sponsors and Build machines

    In previous posts about the riscv64 port there were mentions about history, progress and other details, but in this one I want to address the topic of sponsors and build machines, which even if there are mentions from time to time (e.g. in talks and slides posted here), it has not been covered in a comprehensive manner.

    And it's only fair that we acknowledge people and orgs sponsoring and contributing resources... and about time too. They will appear roughly in chronological order.

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