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Wednesday, 22 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

FSFE: FOSDEM, Chaos Communication Congress, and Story of Evaggelos Balaskas

Filed under
GNU
OSS
  • Cory Doctorow +++ (pre-) FOSDEM +++ 36C3

    2020 is not just a new year, it is the dawn of a new decade. With more and more automated systems run by software, a political representation of freedom is more needed than ever. Read in our January Newsletter about why Cory Doctorow supports the FSFE financially and why you should do so too. Read about our upcoming FOSDEM activities including our pre-FOSDEM meeting and reflections on our presence at the Chaos Communication Congress. Also we have a new Software Freedom Podcast with Harald Welte and reports from our community.

  • Report from the 36c3, about:freedom - about:fsfe

    At the end of December, FSFE was in Leipzig at the 36th Chaos Communication Congress. As in previous years, we were present at the congress with lots of information material, talks and workshops. FSFE was one of the main organisers of the cluster about:freedom, an association of 12 civil society organisations and groups. Together with the other organisations, we focused on digital rights and network policy issues.

    In about:freedom, a broad political spectrum of topics could be covered due to the many different focuses of the individual organisations and groups. At our booth we informed about Free Software and presented individual campaigns of us. Together with the cluster about:freedom, we organised 19 self-organised sessions during the 4 days. To only name a few, the hand-on workshop „Freedom to go“ for a Google Independent Android Smartphone by Erik Albers, the more general presentation "The Free Software 1x1: Clarifying the basics and typical misunderstandings", "Computer says no": Worüber sollen Algorithmen entscheiden dürfen by Chris Köver, Emergency VPN: Analyzing mobile network traffic to detect digital threats and the talk by Christian Busse regarding Free Software in Science: "Free Software for Open Science" were part of the sessions.

  • The story of my first job in Tech Industry

    The other day I was thinking about my first ever job in this industry as a junior software engineer at the age of 20. I was doing okay with my studies at the Athens university of applied sciences but I was working outside of this industry. I had to gain some working experience in the field, so I made a decision to find part time work in a small software house. The experience and lessons learned in those couple weeks are still with me till this day … almost 20 years after!

More Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Hello Word in Django: How to start with Django

    In this article, we will learn how to develop and run a python-Django app in less than 5 minutes.

  • Python GUI Programming With Tkinter

    Python has a lot of GUI frameworks, but Tkinter is the only framework that’s built into the Python standard library. Tkinter has several strengths. It’s cross-platform, so the same code works on Windows, macOS, and Linux. Visual elements are rendered using native operating system elements, so applications built with Tkinter look like they belong on the platform where they’re run.

    Although Tkinter is considered the de-facto Python GUI framework, it’s not without criticism. One notable criticism is that GUIs built with Tkinter look outdated. If you want a shiny, modern interface, then Tkinter may not be what you’re looking for.

    However, Tkinter is lightweight and relatively painless to use compared to other frameworks. This makes it a compelling choice for building GUI applications in Python, especially for applications where a modern sheen is unnecessary, and the top priority is to build something that’s functional and cross-platform quickly.

  • The contextmanager Decorator

    Context managers provide a cool programming pattern, especially if you’re forgetful or just have too much to keep track of and you want to simplify your life.

  • URLs Lead The Way

    In the last article in the Understand Django series, we saw how a user’s browser request goes from their browser to Django’s “front door.” Now it’s time to look at how Django processes those requests.

    An HTTP request coming from a browser includes a URL describing which resource Django should produce. Since URLs can come in many forms, we must instruct Django on the kinds of URLs that our web application can handle. This is what the URL configuration is for. In the Django documentation, the URL configuration is called a URLconf, for short.

    Where is the URLconf? The URLconf is at the module path set by the ROOT_URLCONF setting in your project’s settings file. If you ran the startproject command, then that setting will be named like project.urls where “project” is the name given as an argument to the command. In other words, the URLconf is placed right next to the settings.py file in project/urls.py.

Do You Really Need Antivirus Software on Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

There’s a myth that Linux doesn’t have viruses. but for most people, it’s true that they don’t need an antivirus on Linux. How can both those claims be true? Do you really need antivirus on your Linux machine?

Although there have been cases like EvilGnome, a piece of malware that made headlines last year for infecting Linux desktops, they are ultra-rare. The short answer is that thanks to being more securely designed, better maintained, and, truth be told, less popular, Linux ends up being safer than Windows.

There’s no simple yes or no answer to the question of our title, though, as it depends on the user and their needs.

Read more

Also: Security updates for Wednesday

GameMode 1.5

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Feral's GameMode 1.5 Now Supports Changing The CPU Governor Differently For iGPUs

    With Feral's GameMode 1.5 the big change facing users is for those running integrated graphics. In a change led by an Intel open-source graphics driver developer, GameMode now supports setting an alternative CPU frequency scaling governor for integrated graphics use-cases. Up to now GameMode has defaulted to always using the "performance" CPU frequency scaling governor for normally delivering the best performance, but for integrated graphics that in some situations can lead to lower performance. Due to the integrated graphics and CPU cores sharing the same power envelope, ramping up the CPU performance can throw the graphics performance out of balance and at least for some games lead to lower performance. So with GameMode 1.5, the user can now opt for "powersave" or an alternative governor instead when using an iGPU.

  • Feral Interactive's open source 'GameMode' system performance booster has a new release

    Feral Interactive don't just port a lot of games to Linux, they also work on some open source bits here and there. One of their projects is GameMode, which just got a new release.

    GameMode is a "daemon/lib combo for Linux that allows games to request a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS and/or a game process". In simple terms, it can help ensure your Linux PC is giving the game all it can to run smoothly. Looks like someone new is handling the project too, with Alex Smith having left Feral Interactive.

Mozilla on Privacy Badger, Rust and Digital ID Systems

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox Extension Spotlight: Privacy Badger

    People can't be expected to understand all of the technically complex ways their online behavior is tracked by hidden entities. As you casually surf the web, there are countless techniques different third party actors use to secretly track your online movement. So how are we supposed to protect our privacy online if we don't even understand how the game works?

    To help answer this, the good folks at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (a non-profit devoted to defending digital privacy) built Privacy Badger--a browser extension designed to give you highly advanced tracking protection, while requiring you to do nothing more than install it on Firefox. No configuration, no advanced settings, no fuss. Once you have Privacy Badger installed, it automatically scours every website you visit in its relentless hunt for hidden trackers. And when it finds them, blocks them.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 322
  • What could an “Open” ID system look like?: Recommendations and Guardrails for National Biometric ID Projects

    Digital ID systems are increasingly the battlefield where the fight for privacy, security, competition, and social inclusion is playing out. In our ever more connected world, some form of identity is almost always mediating our interactions online and offline. From the corporate giants that dominate our online lives using services like Apple ID and Facebook and Google’s login systems to government IDs which are increasingly required to vote, get access to welfare benefits, loans, pay taxes, get on transportation or access medical care.

    Part of the push to adopt digital ID comes from the international development community who argue that this is necessary in order to expand access to legal ID. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for “providing legal identity for all, including birth registration” by 2030. Possessing legal identity is increasingly a precondition to accessing basic services and entitlements from both state and private services. For the most marginalised communities, using digital ID systems to access essential services and entitlements from both state and private services are often one of their first interactions with digital technologies. Without these commonly recognized forms of official identification, individuals are at risk of exclusion and denial of services. However, the conflation of digital identity as the same as (or an extension of) “legal identity”, especially by the international development community, has led to an often uncritical embrace of digital ID projects.

    In this white paper, we survey the landscape around government digital ID projects and biometric systems in particular. We recommend several policy prescriptions and guardrails for these systems, drawing heavily from our experiences in India and Kenya, among other countries.

    In designing, implementing, and operating digital ID systems, governments must make a series of technical and policy choices. It is these choices that largely determine if an ID system will be empowering or exploitative and exclusionary. While several organizations have published principles around digital identity, too often they don’t act as a meaningful constraint on the relentless push to expand digital identity around the world. In this paper, we propose that openness provides a useful framework to guide and critique these choices and to ensure that identity systems put people first. Specifically, we examine and make recommendations around five elements of openness: multiplicity of choices, decentralization, accountability, inclusion, and participation.

Red Hat/IBM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenShift 4.3 and OpenSCAP

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM POWER9: An open foundation to power intelligent business decisions

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, we unveiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the next generation of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, which provides the scale, flexibility and innovation to drive enterprise workloads across the hybrid cloud. Even with the advancements across the platform, we recognize that there’s no singular panacea to overcome every unique IT challenge. To meet these needs, Red Hat delivers specialized offerings built around Red Hat Enterprise Linux to address specific hardware, applications and environment requirements, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 continues this strategy with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM Power Systems (POWER9).

  • OpenShift 4.3: Quay Container Security Integration

    In the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Web UI Console, we introduced a new Cluster Overview Dashboard as the landing page when users first log in. The dashboard is there to help users resolve issues more efficiently and maintain a healthy cluster. With the latest 4.3 release, we added an image security section to the cluster health dashboard card. This section will appear on the dashboard when the Container Security Operator gets installed.

  • Deploying OpenSCAP on Satellite using Ansible

    In many environments today, security is one of the top priorities. New information security vulnerabilities are discovered regularly, and these incidents can have a significant impact on businesses and their customers. Red Hat customers I talk to are frequently looking for tools they can use to help evaluate and secure their environments.

    One of these tools is OpenSCAP, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and can perform compliance and vulnerability scanning on RHEL servers. Satellite makes OpenSCAP easier to use by allowing you to deploy the OpenSCAP agent to hosts, manage the OpenSCAP policies centrally, and to view OpenSCAP reports from the Satellite web interface.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Using IF ELSE condition in Django template

    IF tag evaluates the variable and variable is considered True if it exists and is not empty (if that variable is any iterable) and is not a False boolean value. Which means we can use a boolean variable, a list or a set with IF tag.

  • Ensemble/Voting Classification in Python with Scikit-Learn

    Ensemble classification models can be powerful machine learning tools capable of achieving excellent performance and generalizing well to new, unseen datasets.

    The value of an ensemble classifier is that, in joining together the predictions of multiple classifiers, it can correct for errors made by any individual classifier, leading to better accuracy overall. Let's take a look at the different ensemble classification methods and see how these classifiers can be implemented in Scikit-Learn.

  • PyCharm 2019.3.2

    We’ve been taking some time to polish PyCharm further, so be sure to update to the newest version! You can get it from within PyCharm (Help | Check for Updates), using JetBrains Toolbox, or by downloading the new version from our website.

  • EuroPython 2020: Pre-launch Website Ready

    In the last couple of weeks we have put together a pre-launch site for EuroPython 2020, which has all the information around the event, as we currently know and can share with you.

s-tui CPU Monitoring And Stress Testing Tool Sees Its First Stable (1.0.0) Release

Filed under
Software

s-tui, a terminal-based CPU monitoring and stress testing tool for Linux, has reached version 1.0.0 stable after being in development for almost 3 years.

s-tui monitors the CPU frequency, utilization, temperature, fan speeds and power using colored graphs, while also showing performance dips caused by thermal throttling.

The tool also has built-in options for stress testing the CPU using third party tools like stress or stress-ng.

Read more

EasyOS version 2.2.5 released

Filed under
Debian

The previous official release was 2.2. What is new is mostly work on the infrastructure.

This includes hardware-profiling for video and sound, to automatically handle booting of a USB-stick on different computers, or plugging in different cards on the same computer.

There has also been a lot of work on Bluetooth, in particular to support sound, such as Bluetooth speakers and earbuds.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Linux needs easier bug reporting tools

Filed under
Linux

I get that developers need specific information for bug reports, but in many cases, the extraction of that information is beyond the pay grade of the average user. Take, for instance, the backtrace. The backtrace command is a powerful tool that allows the user to start an application while gathering specific information about why a program might not be running properly. This is not a command built for the new user. I've been using Linux since the late 1990s and I have to remind myself how the tool is used (because I don't use it often).

Read more

Games: Starcom: Nexus, Wild Woods, Shrine

Filed under
Gaming
  • Wx3 Labs continue polishing the Linux Beta of Starcom: Nexus - it's looking good

    After getting a Linux Beta build back in December, the open-world space action and adventure game Starcom: Nexus continues getting polished up for Linux support.

    The developer provided a key, so I took a look to see how the Linux version was running and it's fantastic. I've yet to come across any issues with it. As a massive fan of space, the possibility of aliens and sci-fi tech Starcom: Nexus definitely ticks a lot of the right boxes and the story reminds me of Star Trek: Voyager.

  • You can now nominate games for the GamingOnLinux GOTY Award

    It's finally here! We're bringing back the GamingOnLinux GOTY Awards we did a few years ago, so it's time to get nominating.

    How it usually works is we have this dedicated GOTY Page, you pick a category and then search for a game in the box at the top to nominate it in that category. You can nominate as many as you wish, as long as they fit within the category.

    Once enough time has passed we will then lock down nominations, clear up any in the wrong place and open it for voting in around a week or two.

  • Wild Woods, a free couch co-op action game about defending a moving wagon

    Currently free on itch.io while it's not finished, Wild Woods resembles Unrailed! a little in that you're protecting a moving vehicle but it does it in a rather different way.

    Playable by yourself or with up to three others (1-4 players), you will be running alongside your wagon as it travels through a dangerous forest. During the daytime you can collect resources, which will be vital for surviving the night. When the sun goes down, bandits come out and attack. As you progress, you get to do a few upgrades on your wagon and overall it's a real sweet game to try out.

  • Shrine, a total conversion of Doom II has you slaying Eldritch abominations

    Regular readers will know by now that I love a good first-person shooter, I also keep an eye on fun mods and entire conversions of Doom. Shrine is another recent discovery, sending you into the Eldritch depths of hell.

    Shrine is inspired by Lovecraftian horror, so it's very much styled as you would expect with seriously freaky looking enemy types. It has 8 brand new weapons, 13 enemies to blast into the next dimension, 16 levels that are surprisingly challenging and a ton of custom textures/sounds and more.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • New Linux System Call Proposed To Let User-Space Pin Themselves To Specific CPU Cores

    A "pin_on_cpu" system call has been proposed for the Linux kernel as a new means of letting user-space threads pin themselves to specific CPU cores.

    User-space processes requesting to be run on specific CPU cores can already e done by the likes of Linux's sched_setaffinity to get/set the CPU affinity mask while pin_on_cpu would be a new and simpler way.

  • First ‘ktown’ Plasma5 update for Slackware in 2020

    Slackware and Plasma5… what will 2020 bring?

    For starters, Pat just added Kerberos to Slackware-current! That is the first (small but significant) step towards a big change in Slackware which will unfold over the coming period. And at the end of that, I expect that Plasma5 gets folded into the distro as well. Here’s hoping!

    In any case, I just released KDE-5_20.01 and the packages are available for download from my ‘ktown‘ repository. As always, these packages are meant to be installed on a full installation of Slackware-current which has had its KDE4 removed first. These packages will not work on Slackware 14.2.

  • An Open Source Effort to Encrypt the Internet of Things

    End-to-end encryption is a staple of secure messaging apps like WhatsApp and Signal. It ensures that no one—even the app developer—can access your data as it traverses the web. But what if you could bring some version of that protection to increasingly ubiquitous—and notoriously insecure—internet-of-things devices?

  • Why UK leaders need open technology for the disrupted future

    We’re not quite past the post with Brexit, but thankfully, we have moved beyond the Brexit hiatus. And, it’s time we did. Whatever your views on the merits of Brexit, as the UK’s Prime Minister has stressed, it’s time to move on and move forward.

    In fact, there may be no better time to spread the word about being open for business by highlighting the benefits of open technology. It is a task that all business leaders in the UK need to embrace. By seizing the moment to “get open done”, we can not only develop and sustain the UK’s leadership in open technology, but also carve out our status on the world stage for many years to come.

    The timing couldn’t be better. It’s a pivotal moment to demonstrate how declaring our independence of European markets does not equate with a lack of collaboration or creativity.

    Brexit offers us a convenient pause; a time for us to take stock and reflect on who we are as a nation and what we can offer global markets. We’ve had our fair share of inventors and game-changers in the past. Now, we have an opportunity to show the UK can lead in technology.

  • Acculturation Guide

    The Acculturation Guide is a hands-on “boot camp” for those interested in the configuration, administration and operation of applications on YottaDB. This file is the script (or workbook) for the workshop, consisting of the exercises below.

    At the end of these exercises, you should have a basic working knowledge of the essential aspects of YottaDB Administration and Operation. While this workshop alone will not by any means make you a YottaDB expert, the basic working knowledge it will give you will help you to quickly understand the concepts explained in the user documentation and put you on the path to becoming an expert.

    The workshop is not a course in programming with YottaDB. Familiarity with Linux® (or at least UNIX®) will allow you to move faster through the material, but is not absolutely required. If you have no experience whatsoever with Linux or UNIX, supplementary tutorial material on the side will increase your level of comfort.

  • Where InfluxDB time series database is going

    Paul Dix: So in mid-2012, I started this company and basically we wanted to build a SaaS [software as a service] product for doing real-time metrics and monitoring. Initially my idea was I wanted to do anomaly detection and machine learning on data sets, but to build that we first had to build all the infrastructure, so we could collect time series data at scale and query it.

    Fast forward, basically another year, and we went to Y Combinator, we did the winter of 2013 batch and this product wasn't really taking off. But I could see that there was something from an infrastructure perspective. We did have some customers paying us and I talked to them, asked why they were paying us. They told us that they were using our product as a time series platform.

    So we pivoted and the goal was initially to build a database, but that later morphed into being an entire platform for working with time series data. My goal was to build something that was generally useful for developers to create their applications with.

  • Accessibility checker and support for PDF/UA specs

    PDF/UA or ISO 14289 is a specifications that defines the requirements for accessibility in a PDF document. The specification defines the required structure and formatting of the document (also refers to WCAG specification from W3C for use on the web) and PDF features, which should be enabled or disabled so the document is better suited for accessibility (for example PDF tags are required).

    Thanks to the Dutch Standardisation Forum for financially sponsoring and Collabora Productivity in cooperation with Nou&Off for the work on implementing this specification into LibreOffice.

  • Cops: Waze App Directs Casino-Bound Drivers Into Wilderness

    “The address on the ad lists 1 Borgata Way in Atlantic City NJ, which is correct, the location pinned with the ad is actually in the middle of the Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area, near Lake Success.”

  • Senators to Trump administration: Protect small businesses from Iranian [cracking] threat [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The advisory from DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency warned of Iran’s history of “disruptive and destructive cyber operations against strategic targets” and advised U.S. organizations to consider whether they make an attractive target for the Iranians. According to the FBI, those potential private-sector targets include cleared defense contractors.

  • Python Bytes Episode #165: Ranges as dictionary keys - oh my!
  • mintCast 326.5 – Biscuits and a Thinkpad

    In our Innards section, we talk all things ‘Lenovo Thinkpads’

  • Microsoft is testing ads in WordPad in Windows 10

    Over the years Microsoft has taken numerous controversial decisions with Windows 10, including installing sponsored apps, using the Start menu to advertise apps it thinks you might be interested in, and -- of course -- the various forms of data-collecting telemetry.

    Now it has been discovered that more ads could be on their way. A Windows researcher has uncovered ads in WordPad encouraging people to try out Word, Excel and PowerPoint online.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Operator pattern: REST API for Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift

    In this article, we will see a similar pattern when writing the REST API in any known framework vs. writing an Operator using Kubernetes’ client libraries. The idea behind this article is not to explain how to write a REST API, but instead to explain the internals of Kubernetes by working with an analogy.

  • Rust framework dev says ‘I’m done with Open Source’…has second thoughts

    The main developer behind a Rust actor framework pulled the code behind the project in apparent protest against an “unsafe sh*tstorm” against him last week.

    And while the coder in question now appears to have nominated new leadership to continue the project, the apparent “ragequit” has prompted questions about the dynamics within the open source community.

    [...]

    “You could notice after each unsafe shitstorm, I started to spend less and less time with the community,” he continued. “You felt betrayed after you put so much effort and then to hear all this sh*t comments, even if you understand that that is usual internet behavior. Anyway, removing issue was a stupid idea. But I was pissed off with last two personal comments, especially while sitting and thinking how to solve the problem. I am sorry for doing that.” [SIC]

  • How to Write and Run a C Program in Linux

    Linux is becoming programming heaven for developers, being an open-source and free operating system. Turbo C compiler is already an old approach to compile programs so let us programmers move to Linux for a new programming environment. In this article,

  • TechWiser’s giant Raspberry Pi AirPod speaker (and more)

    YouTube is a haven for awesome Raspberry Pi projects, and we often spend time scanning through the platform’s wares for hidden gems. One such hidden gem is this video from TechWiser, in which they showcase some of their favourite Raspberry Pi projects:

  • A quick-and-dirty guide on how to install packages for Python

    When people start learning Python, they often will come across a package they want to try and it will usually start with "just pip install it!" The problem with that advice is it's a very simplistic view of how to manage packages and can actually lead to problems down the road. And while there is a tutorial on installing packages at packaging.python.org, it might be a bit intimidating for some if they are just looking to quickly get up and going.

    If you just want to start poking at Python and want to avoid the pitfalls to installing packages globally, it only takes 3 steps to do the right thing.

Games: Albion Online, Rosewater, Terminal Phase, The Coma 2

Filed under
Gaming
  • Albion Online has the 'biggest-ever' update now live named 'Queen'

    The Queen update for the MMO Albion Online is live, what Sandbox Interactive claim is the "biggest-ever". This is the eighth post-release content update for Albion Online, with a focus on a major rework of the Outlands continent.

    A new Hideouts system sounds quite fun, giving Guilds a place to build a secret underground base in the open-world black zones (full PvP). You will see see a lot more open-world PvP battles with a new territory claiming system, new Elite enemy NPCs to fight in Elite Randomized Dungeons, a new skin customization system, simplified and streamlined Item Power progression and more.

  • Rosewater, a wild west adventure set in the world of Lamplight City is coming to Linux next year

    Grundislav Games along with Application Systems Heidelberg have announced Rosewater, a wild west adventure set in the world of their previous game Lamplight City.

    "It's been several years since Harley Leger left New Bretagne and headed west, hoping to leave the past behind and make her way as a freelance writer. After arriving in the sleepy border town of Rosewater, a seemingly trivial assignment for the local paper leads to the hunt for a missing man's fortune--and the story of the century."

  • Terminal Phase – A Space Shooter Game That Runs In Terminal

    Today, I came across an interesting CLI game called Terminal Space, a space shooter game that runs in your Terminal. It is somewhat similar to a mobile game named Space Impact that usually came bundled with several old Nokia phones. I have played Space Impact game on my Nokia basic model phone several years ago. It was really interesting and addictive game. If you’ve played Space Impact, Terminal Space might look very familiar. It is an open source project released under GPLv3 and is written in Racket programming language. In this brief guide, I am going to show you how to install and play Terminal Phase space shooter game in Terminal on Linux.

  • The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters has a new trailer ahead of the full release next week

    Leaving Early Access on January 28, the Korean-made survival-horror The Coma 2: Vicious Sisters has a new trailer.

    While it's technically part of a series, you don't need any amiliarity with the story from The Coma: Recut. Vicious Sisters follows a new protagonist, Mina Park and her first experience in the Shadow Realm. However, if you've played the previous game you might spot some familiar faces.

EasyNAS 1.0 Beta-1

Filed under
Security
SUSE

This doesn’t mean it’s finished. it only means that the firmware update can take this version up to 1.0 GA. Almost most of the features are ready, still there are some edges that need to attend to. Still need to test everything but it will be easier with the new design.
Updates are hosted from EasyNAS repo that will also have the addons, it will be able to install new packages and distribute new code, new languages even custom apps that someone need.
Working as fast as I can

Read more

Ubuntu Studio Has a New Website and Ubuntu Server Has a New Report

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Studio: New Website!

    Ubuntu Studio has had the same website design for nearly 9 years. Today, that changed.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 21 January 2020

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list or visit the Ubuntu Server discourse hub for more discussion.

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today's howtos

GameMode 1.5

  • Feral's GameMode 1.5 Now Supports Changing The CPU Governor Differently For iGPUs

    With Feral's GameMode 1.5 the big change facing users is for those running integrated graphics. In a change led by an Intel open-source graphics driver developer, GameMode now supports setting an alternative CPU frequency scaling governor for integrated graphics use-cases. Up to now GameMode has defaulted to always using the "performance" CPU frequency scaling governor for normally delivering the best performance, but for integrated graphics that in some situations can lead to lower performance. Due to the integrated graphics and CPU cores sharing the same power envelope, ramping up the CPU performance can throw the graphics performance out of balance and at least for some games lead to lower performance. So with GameMode 1.5, the user can now opt for "powersave" or an alternative governor instead when using an iGPU.

  • Feral Interactive's open source 'GameMode' system performance booster has a new release

    Feral Interactive don't just port a lot of games to Linux, they also work on some open source bits here and there. One of their projects is GameMode, which just got a new release. GameMode is a "daemon/lib combo for Linux that allows games to request a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS and/or a game process". In simple terms, it can help ensure your Linux PC is giving the game all it can to run smoothly. Looks like someone new is handling the project too, with Alex Smith having left Feral Interactive.

Mozilla on Privacy Badger, Rust and Digital ID Systems

  • Firefox Extension Spotlight: Privacy Badger

    People can't be expected to understand all of the technically complex ways their online behavior is tracked by hidden entities. As you casually surf the web, there are countless techniques different third party actors use to secretly track your online movement. So how are we supposed to protect our privacy online if we don't even understand how the game works? To help answer this, the good folks at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (a non-profit devoted to defending digital privacy) built Privacy Badger--a browser extension designed to give you highly advanced tracking protection, while requiring you to do nothing more than install it on Firefox. No configuration, no advanced settings, no fuss. Once you have Privacy Badger installed, it automatically scours every website you visit in its relentless hunt for hidden trackers. And when it finds them, blocks them.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 322
  • What could an “Open” ID system look like?: Recommendations and Guardrails for National Biometric ID Projects

    Digital ID systems are increasingly the battlefield where the fight for privacy, security, competition, and social inclusion is playing out. In our ever more connected world, some form of identity is almost always mediating our interactions online and offline. From the corporate giants that dominate our online lives using services like Apple ID and Facebook and Google’s login systems to government IDs which are increasingly required to vote, get access to welfare benefits, loans, pay taxes, get on transportation or access medical care. Part of the push to adopt digital ID comes from the international development community who argue that this is necessary in order to expand access to legal ID. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for “providing legal identity for all, including birth registration” by 2030. Possessing legal identity is increasingly a precondition to accessing basic services and entitlements from both state and private services. For the most marginalised communities, using digital ID systems to access essential services and entitlements from both state and private services are often one of their first interactions with digital technologies. Without these commonly recognized forms of official identification, individuals are at risk of exclusion and denial of services. However, the conflation of digital identity as the same as (or an extension of) “legal identity”, especially by the international development community, has led to an often uncritical embrace of digital ID projects. In this white paper, we survey the landscape around government digital ID projects and biometric systems in particular. We recommend several policy prescriptions and guardrails for these systems, drawing heavily from our experiences in India and Kenya, among other countries. In designing, implementing, and operating digital ID systems, governments must make a series of technical and policy choices. It is these choices that largely determine if an ID system will be empowering or exploitative and exclusionary. While several organizations have published principles around digital identity, too often they don’t act as a meaningful constraint on the relentless push to expand digital identity around the world. In this paper, we propose that openness provides a useful framework to guide and critique these choices and to ensure that identity systems put people first. Specifically, we examine and make recommendations around five elements of openness: multiplicity of choices, decentralization, accountability, inclusion, and participation.

Red Hat/IBM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenShift 4.3 and OpenSCAP

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM POWER9: An open foundation to power intelligent business decisions

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, we unveiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the next generation of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, which provides the scale, flexibility and innovation to drive enterprise workloads across the hybrid cloud. Even with the advancements across the platform, we recognize that there’s no singular panacea to overcome every unique IT challenge. To meet these needs, Red Hat delivers specialized offerings built around Red Hat Enterprise Linux to address specific hardware, applications and environment requirements, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 continues this strategy with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM Power Systems (POWER9).

  • OpenShift 4.3: Quay Container Security Integration

    In the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Web UI Console, we introduced a new Cluster Overview Dashboard as the landing page when users first log in. The dashboard is there to help users resolve issues more efficiently and maintain a healthy cluster. With the latest 4.3 release, we added an image security section to the cluster health dashboard card. This section will appear on the dashboard when the Container Security Operator gets installed.

  • Deploying OpenSCAP on Satellite using Ansible

    In many environments today, security is one of the top priorities. New information security vulnerabilities are discovered regularly, and these incidents can have a significant impact on businesses and their customers. Red Hat customers I talk to are frequently looking for tools they can use to help evaluate and secure their environments. One of these tools is OpenSCAP, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and can perform compliance and vulnerability scanning on RHEL servers. Satellite makes OpenSCAP easier to use by allowing you to deploy the OpenSCAP agent to hosts, manage the OpenSCAP policies centrally, and to view OpenSCAP reports from the Satellite web interface.