Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 14 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC debuts AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus

Filed under
Hardware

echNexion’s “Wandboard IMX8M-Plus” SBC runs Linux or Android on NXP’s new i.MX8M Plus with 2.3-TOPS NPU. Pre-orders go for $134 with 2GB RAM or $159 with 4GB and WiFi/BT, both with 32GB and M.2 with NVMe.

In January, NXP announced its i.MX8M Plus — its first i.MX8 SoC with an NPU for AI acceleration — but so far the only product we’ve seen based on it is a briefly teased Verdin iMX8M Plus module from Toradex. Now, TechNexion has opened pre-orders for a Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC based on a SODIMM-style “EDM SOM” module equipped with the i.MX8M Plus.

Read more

Kernel: Linux 5.9 Changes and Linux Plumbers Passes

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.9 Brings Safeguard Following NVIDIA's Recent "GPL Condom" Incident

    Stemming from the recent discussions over NVIDIA NetGPU code that relied on another shim for interfacing between NVIDIA's proprietary driver and the open-source kernel code, a new patch is on the way for Linux 5.9 to fight back against such efforts.

    As a result of that "NetGPU" code patch series and the ensuing discussion, longtime kernel developer Christoph Hellwig followed through with a set of kernel patches to tighten up access to kernel symbols exported as GPL-only and are frequently used by these open-source "shim" drivers to sit between the open-source kernel code and the binary kernel modules. This situation also known as the "GPL condom" defense is working to be better avoided with Linux 5.9+ kernels.

  • Linux 5.9 Dropping Xen 32-bit PV Guest Support

    Back in Linux 5.4 Xen 32-bit PV guest support was deprecated while now for Linux 5.9 it's set to be removed entirely. Last year's deprecation comes with the 32-bit usage dwindling in general but PVH being preferred to PV, Meltdown mitigations not being present, and the code not seeing much activity. Now for Linux 5.9 that support is being gutted.

  • Final passes for sale for Linux Plumbers

    We hit our registration cap again and have added a few more passes. The final date for purchasing passes is August 19th at 11:59pm PST. If the passes sell out before then we will not be adding more. Thank you all once again for your enthusiasm and we look forward to seeing you August 24-28!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Want Social Justice? The Free Software Movement Fights For Everyone!

    Everyone wants freedom but most people have no idea just how enslaved they have become to their computing devices and the proprietary software that controls those devices. The Free Software Movement aims to spread awareness of this issue and to advocate for the use of freedom-respecting software ("free software").

  • Participate in Hacktoberfest, Help Develop Contributions

    The month-long, virtual-festival event that celebrates open source contributions, Hacktoberfest, is coming soon and members of the openSUSE community can make a difference.

    The event that is in its seventh year and run by Digital Ocean and DEV encourages people to make their first contributions to open source projects.

    The event is for developers, designers who contribute artwork, people who can contribute to documentation,and more.

    As the event brings more awareness to open-source projects and encourages contributions that benefit communities, having developers and community members available to help people who want to contribute can be beneficial to the project.

  • Are universities spending enough on cybersecurity? [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Such attacks “will absolutely continue”, said Mark Ford, who leads higher education risk and financial advisory services for the audit firm Deloitte. As higher education becomes known as an “easy target”, this increasingly “attracts the bad guys”, he explained.

    The threat comes not just from criminals seeking money. Universities now house arguably the most valuable secrets on earth – plans for a coronavirus vaccine – putting them in the sights of state-backed [cr]ackers. In July, UK, US and Canadian intelligence services warned that Russian groups were attempting to target Covid-19 vaccine research and development.

    This raises the question: are universities doing enough to defend themselves against [cr]acking?

  • vScaler Integrates SLURM with GigaIO FabreX for Elastic HPC Cloud Device Scaling
  • vScaler Announces SLURM integration with GigaIO FabreX

    The additional integration of the SLURM workload manager, an open-source job scheduler for Linux and Unix-like kernels, means that vScaler Cloud users can request traditional resources like memory and compute cores to be available for jobs.

  • Profiling slow-running queries in Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility)

    Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility) is a fast, scalable, highly available, and fully managed document database service that supports MongoDB workloads. You can use the same MongoDB 3.6 application code, drivers, and tools to run, manage, and scale workloads on Amazon DocumentDB without having to worry about managing the underlying infrastructure. As a document database, Amazon DocumentDB makes it easy to store, query, and index JSON data.

    AWS built Amazon DocumentDB to uniquely solve your challenges around availability, performance, reliability, durability, scalability, backup, and more. In doing so, we built several tools, like the profiler, to help you run analyze your workload on Amazon DocumentDB. The profiler gives you the ability to log the time and details of slow-running operations on your cluster. In this post, we show you how to use the profiler in Amazon DocumentDB to analyze slow-running queries to identify bottlenecks and improve individual query performance and overall cluster performance.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Self-publishing and the 2nd edition of Ansible for DevOps

    Five years, 834 commits, and 24 major revisions later, I've just published the 2nd edition of Ansible for DevOps, a book which has now sold over 60,000 copies and spawned a popular free Ansible 101 video series on YouTube.

  • Open Standards Are Simple

    If you want to create a truly open standard, you _need_ to make it simple.

    There are no exceptions to this rule. When a standard becomes harder to fully implement than what your average motivated programmer can do in two months (max!), it _shouldn't_ be considered "open" anymore.

    Why?

  • In Which COVID-19 Misinformation Leads To A Bunch of Graphs Made With Rust

    A funny — and by funny, I mean sad — thing has happened. Recently the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has been analyzing data from the patchwork implementation of mask requirements in Kansas. They came to a conclusion that shouldn’t be surprising to anyone: masks help. They published a chart showing this. A right-wing propaganda publication got ahold of this, and claimed the numbers were “doctored” because there were two-different Y-axes.

    I set about to analyze the data myself from public sources, and produced graphs of various kinds using a single Y-axis and supporting the idea that the graphs were not, in fact, doctored. Here’s one graph that’s showing that:

    In order to do that, I had imported COVID-19 data from various public sources. Many states in the US are large enough to have significant variation in COVID-19 conditions, and many of the source people look at don’t show county-level data over time. I wanted to do that.

  • Basics of Working with the SQLite Database in Python

    A database is one of the most useful and popular files for storing data; they can be used to store any kind of data, including text, numbers, images, binary data, files, etc. SQLite is a relational database management system based on the SQL language. It is a C library, and it provides an API to work with other programming languages, including Python. It does not require a separate server process to be run as needed in large database engines like MySQL and Postgresql.

    It is swift and lightweight, and the entire database is stored in a single disk file, which makes it portable like CSV or other data storage files. Many applications use SQLite for internal data storage, mainly in environments like mobile devices or small applications.

  • Perl 7 By Default

    Perl 7 has been announced as the next direction of Perl development. My previous blog post explored at a high level the risks and benefits of the announced direction, as well as those of a more incremental proposal. The primary and critical difference between these two approaches is the decision to change interpreter defaults in an incompatible manner. I would like to explore each of the arguments presented for this design choice.

  • CY's Recent Submission for PWC(068-073)

    Skipped blogging on Perl Weekly Challenge(PWC) for a few weeks!

  • SSH vs. kubectl exec

    There’s a lot of similarities between SSH and kubectl, and both have their strengths and weaknesses. While SSH is architecturally set in stone, higher-level software can learn a thing or two from Kubernetes about centralized configuration when managing a fleet of machines. See Teleport for an example of how this can be done. SSH could also borrow the credential management approach from kubeconfigs (i.e. “put all my client creds and server info into one file that I can copy around”).

    kubectl could improve on its non-shell features like port forwarding and file transfer. It’s raw data throughput is also lacking, which precludes it from becoming a transport-layer protocol like SSH. In practice, these tools are complementary and get used for different tasks, it’s not “one or the other”. I hope this post helped you learn something new about both!

  • Can we do better than our C compiler?

    Today, I wanted to become a C compiler. I added a hand-compiled assembly version of echo from our previous coding exercise and added a new make target, make asm, that will assemble it. Let's look at our hand-compiled assembly and compare it to our C compiler and ask whether or not it was worth it.

  • Benign Data Races Considered Harmful

    The series of posts about so called benign data races stirred a lot of controversy and led to numerous discussions at the startup I was working at called Corensic. Two bastions formed, one claiming that no data race was benign, and the other claiming that data races were essential for performance. Then it turned out that we couldn’t even agree on the definition of a data race. In particular, the C++11 definition seemed to deviate from the established notions.

  • Micronaut 2.0 Full-Stack Java Framework Released

    The Micronaut framework uses Java's annotation processors, which work with any JVM language that supports them, as well as an HTTP server and client built on the Netty non-blocking I/O client server framework. To provide a programming model similar to Spring and Grails, these annotation processors pre-compile the required metadata to perform DI, define AOP proxies, and configure applications to run in a low-memory environment, the company says. Many of the APIs in Micronaut were "heavily inspired" by Spring and Grails," which was by design and aids in bringing developers up to speed quickly," the company says.

  • Understanding computer vision and AI, part 1

    An active area in the field of computer vision is object detection, where the goal is to not only localize objects of interest within an image but also assign a label to each of these objects of interest. Considerable recent successes in the area of object detection stem from modern advances in deep learning, particularly leveraging deep convolutional neural networks. Much of the initial focus was on improving accuracy, leading to increasingly more complex object detection networks such as SSD, R-CNN, Mask R-CNN, and other extended variants of these networks. While such networks demonstrated state-of-the-art object detection performance, they were very challenging, if not impossible, to deploy on edge and mobile devices due to computational and memory constraints. This greatly limits the widespread adoption for a wide range of applications such as robotics, video surveillance, autonomous driving where local embedded processing is required.

    [...]

    Model Evaluation is an integral part of the model development process. It helps to find the best model that represents our data and how well the chosen model performs on unseen data.

    To improve the model we tune the hyper-parameters; parameter that determines the network structure (number of neurons in the network, network activation functions) or training parameter (gradient descent learning rate, adding parameters like momentum in the weight update rule). Tuning those parameters is an inevitable and important step to obtain better performance. Methods like GridSearch and RandomizedSearch can be used to navigate through the different parameters.

  • Qt Design Studio 1.6 Beta released

    We are happy to announce the beta release of Qt Design Studio 1.6

    Qt Design Studio is a UI design and development tool that enables designers and developers to rapidly prototype and develop complex UIs. Both designers and developers use Qt Design Studio and this makes collaboration between the two a lot simpler and more streamlined. To get an impression, you should watch this video.

Raspberry Pi Projects and News

Filed under
Hardware

LibreOffice 6.4.5 finally for Slackware 14.2

Filed under
LibO
Slack

The Document Foundation recently released version 7.0.0 of their Libre Office suite of applications. The packages for Slackware-current can be found in my repository. But the situation for Slackware 14.2 used to be different – I got stuck after LibreOffice 6.2 because the newer source releases (6.3 and onwards) require versions of system software that our stable Slackware 14.2 platform does not offer.

From time to time during the last year, when there was time and the build box was not compiling packages, I messed around with the libreoffice.SlackBuild script in futile attempts to compile recent versions of LibreOffice on Slackware 14.2. I failed all the time.
Until last week. After I had uploaded the new KDE Plasma5 packages to ‘ktown‘, I had an epiphany and decided to use a new approach. What I did was: question all the historic stuff in the SlackBuild script that got added whenever I needed to work around compilation failures; and accept that the compilation needs newer versions of software than Slackware 14.2 offers. The first statement meant that I disabled patches and variable declarations that messed with compiler and linker; and for the second statement I stuck to a single guideline: the end product, if I were able to compile a package successfully, has to run out of the box on Slackware 14.2 without the need to update any of the core Slackware packages.

Read more

Web Browsers: New Tor RC, Firefox/Mozilla Trouble, and Web Browsers Need to Stop

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • New release candidate: 0.4.4.4-rc

    There's a new alpha release available for download. If you build Tor from source, you can download the source code for 0.4.4.4-rc from the download page. Packages should be available over the coming weeks, with a new alpha Tor Browser release likely in the coming weeks.

    Remember, this is a release candidate, not a a stable release: you should only run this if you'd like to find and report more bugs than usual.

  • Mozilla is dead

    If Mozilla wants to survive, the management will be fired with unearned compensation, the most important departments will be strengthened, products that nobody ordered will be discontinued and the organization will be limited to its core competence. Browser, email, security, adaptability and the fight for a free Internet. And they work with all their might to ensure that the products will become an integral part of everyday life and all operating systems.

    Three months. That’s all the time they have for a clear signal. After that, users have to make a decision. Unfortunately, it will probably only be something with chromium.

    Poor Internet.

  • Web browsers need to stop

    I call for an immediate and indefinite suspension of the addition of new developer-facing APIs to web browsers. Browser vendors need to start thinking about reducing scope and cutting features. WebUSB, WebBluetooth, WebXR, WebDRM WebMPAA WebBootlicking replacing User-Agent with Vendor-Agent cause let’s be honest with ourselves at this point “Encrypted Media Extensions” — this crap all needs to go. At some point you need to stop adding scope and start focusing on performance, efficiency, reliability, and security5 at the scope you already have.

Games: Dead Cells, Sunset Shapes, Dying Light - Hellraid and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Dead Cells gets another big free update and a Demake Soundtrack

    A chiptune/8-bit version of the Dead Cells soundtrack? Absolutely sign me up. Oh, there's also a brand new free content update out now which is nice too.

    What they're calling the "Barrels o' Fun" update is out now, with an entirely new level/biome to play through which provides you with an alternative path to High Peak Castle which should spice-up the late game. This of course comes with new weapons, enemies, explosions and probably many player deaths. The new biome is called The Derelict Distillery, which comes with its own distinct style full of "old broken barrels and bottles, pipes venting steam, cool looking metal containers in the background - that kind of thing". That's great and all but it's the enemies that are important here, there's a new angry fella who throws big explosive barrels at you.

  • You are what you eat in the run and gun game Bite the Bullet

    What they're calling the "Barrels o' Fun" update is out now, with an entirely new level/biome to play through which provides you with an alternative path to High Peak Castle which should spice-up the late game. This of course comes with new weapons, enemies, explosions and probably many player deaths. The new biome is called The Derelict Distillery, which comes with its own distinct style full of "old broken barrels and bottles, pipes venting steam...

    [...]

    Quite a bit like the feel of Metal Slug, Contra and those sorts of run and gun games but with a little added platforming and wall jumping here and there.

  • Sunset Shapes is a relaxing puzzle game about building shadows

    Playing with shadows is something I'm sure we've all done a few times and Sunset Shapes takes that idea, merges it with some almost Tetris-like shapes to have you build a shadow.

    Inspired by the basic gameplay found in .projekt, each level gives you a set of shapes you need to fill with shadows. To do so, the game drops a bunch of random blocks onto the floor, for you to then move them around the air to attempt to fill out those shadow-shapes. For a puzzle game, it's actually a pretty sweet idea.

  • Evolution sim The Sapling expands in September with massive new features

    Indie game dev Wessel Stoop has announced their evolution sim, The Sapling, will be getting a first proper major update since entering Early Access in 2019.

    With an aim for The Flower Update to land on September 10, Stoop mentioned over email that they spent three months completely rewriting and optimizing the underlying engine. As a result, they mentioned it's become possible to make scenarios 100 times larger.

  • Over 8 years in development later, Factorio is properly out now

    Originally crowdfunded on IndieGoGo back in 2013, who would have thought this 2D game about building conveyor belts across a big map would be such a big hit? A great many years later, 8+ in total and here we are. Factorio has now left Early Access as a proper full game.

    The game was pretty much finished already, this last push was to get it out before Cyberpunk which ended up being delayed anyway. With that in mind, there's some rough edges here and there that needs sorting. Still, they said they wanted to make the release truly special, so they added in a big 'Spidertron' walking spider mech that has all sorts of ridiculous uses and it sounds like serious fun. It can driven, remotely controlled, it has rocket launchers and more.

  • Rip Them Off is an upcoming blend of tower defense and satirical economic management

    Tower defense mixed blended with an economic management puzzle that has a satirical take on capitalism? Can't say I remember any other game that blends such elements together. Rip Them Off from Lozange Lab is releasing in September and it's now their PR team has reached out to us directly here at GOL to confirm Linux PC support.

    "The Board needs its profit, and it’s up to you to line the streets with shops the masses can’t resist. Choose your locations, pick your stores and earn enough to advance up the corporate ladder with its increasingly difficult challenges."

  • Dying Light - Hellraid is out now giving you a little dungeon crawling

    Based loosely upon what would have been a standalone game from Techland (it's "on-hold"), Dying Light - Hellraid, a small DLC that swaps Zombies for Skeletons and sends you into a cramped and streamlined dungeon crawler.

    Techland say it's not just a new map, as they created new enemies for it and it has its own progression system giving you gradual access to new swords, axes and hammers. While you can't take regular equipment into Hellraid, you do get to take these brand new weapons outside into the normal Dying Light world once you pay using the new coin system. It also has co-op support so you can play with others.

  • Dota Underlords is getting a hero rotation soon and a rank reset

    Valve have remembered that Dota Underlords exists and needs some attention, with an announcement that it's going to see a hero rotation soon.

    Addressing the fact that since release, updates have slowed down and have mostly been balance changes, they mentioned how their team has been helping "other recent Valve projects ship" and external issues "2020 everybody" (COVID19 interrupted everything). They've mentioned that in the "next few weeks" we will get a hero rotation bringing in 8 new heroes, along with new alliances, new items and a rank reset. Hopefully this is the start of more updates to come.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

GNUnet 0.13.2 released

Filed under
GNU
Security

This is a bugfix release for gnunet 0.13.1.
It fixes some build issues and contains changes to the REST API implmementation (no change in the API itself) as well as OpenID Connect related fixes to re:claimID.

Read more

What Does Mozilla Firing 25% of its Workforce Tells us About its Future

Filed under
News

Mozilla has fired 250 employees which is 25% of its workforce. Why Mozilla did it and what lies ahead for Mozilla?
Read more

HeliOS is a Tiny Embedded OS Designed for Arduino Boards

Filed under
OS

Mannie Peterson (aka FellFromTree) has developed an embedded operating system called HeliOS that’s designed specifically for 8-bit and 32-bit Arduino boards, and can easily be used from the Arduino IDE.

HeliOS is said to have only 21 function calls and implements cooperative and event-driven multitasking, task notification/messaging, timers, and memory management. It’s a non-preemptive multitasking kernel so you won’t have to deal with mutexes.

The developer explains how scheduling works with HeliOS:

HeliOS uses a run-time balanced strategy which ensures tasks with shorter run-times are prioritized over tasks with longer run-times. This ensures all running tasks receive approximately equal total run-time without using context switching. The other multitasking option available in HeliOS is event driven multitasking, which uses the wait/notify and timer interfaces. Mixing cooperative and event driven tasks in HeliOS is not a problem.

Read more

Debian vs Ubuntu in 2020- The Ultimate Showdown

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

As a computer software distribution package, Ubuntu and Debian are utilized in two ways...

Desktop Operating System
Server

Although they are similar in many ways, they have their differences. Ubuntu is based on the testing branch of Debian and often, Debian involves too many manual works and so it is not recommended for beginners. While Ubuntu is easy to use for beginners, it is not as stable as Debian in its built. Let us have a comparison between Debian vs Ubuntu.

Read more

[email protected] ARM64 Linux Beta Release for COVID-19 Vaccine Research

Filed under
Linux

A few months ago, we reported that [email protected] supported 64-bit Arm SBC’s and Servers in the Fight against COVID-19. But [email protected] did not support Arm hardware just yet, but thanks to work from Nercotix, Linaro, Arm, miniNodes, and Packet.com, we now get support for [email protected] on ARM64 meaning you can help researchers studying SARS-CoV-2 virus and help them develop a COVID-19 vaccine with Raspberry Pi 3/4 boards, or other 64-bit Arm SBC’s and servers.

The solution relies on Neocortix Cloud Services Platform allowing the unused capacity of large numbers of individual mobile phones or other connected nodes to be harnessed into a single, unified computational engine. The very first application that made use of the platform was Neocortix PhonePaycheck were users get paid to let businesses perform calculations on their phones at night while charging and connected to WiFi. That way users of premium phones like Galaxy S10 or S20 can make around $80 a year when used for 8 hours a day, or $240 per year with a spare phone running 24/7.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • An Average IT Org

    Supply chain attacks are a known issue, and also lately there was a discussion around the relevance of reproducible builds. Looking in comparison at an average IT org doing something with the internet, I believe the pressing problem is neither supply chain attacks nor a lack of reproducible builds. The real problem is the amount of prefabricated binaries supplied by someone else, created in an unknown build environment with unknown tools, the average IT org requires to do anything.

    [...]

    Yes some of that is even non-free and might contain spyw^telemetry.

    [...]

    In the end the binary supply is like a drug for the user, and somehow the Debian project is also just another dealer / middle man in this setup. There are probably a lot of open questions to think about in that context.

    Are we the better dealer because we care about signed sources we retrieve from upstream and because we engage in reproducible build projects?

    Are our own means of distributing binaries any better than a binary download from github via https with a manual checksum verification, or the Debian repo at download.docker.com?

    Is the approach of the BSD/Gentoo ports, where you have to compile at least some software from source, the better one?

    Do I really want to know how some of the software is actually build?

  • NSA and FBI warn that new Linux malware threatens national security
  • Critical vulnerabilities in Quiz And Survey Master WordPress Plugin

    Quiz and Survey Master is a WordPress plugin for creating quizzes and surveys easily on WordPress sites. It is installed on over 30,000+ websites.

    Recently WordFence‘s Chloe Chamberland discovered two critical vulnerabilities in Quiz and Survey Master plugin version 7.0.

  • Pros & Cons of WordPress Plugins Auto-updates

    WordPress has released a major update yesterday with some big changes. One of the features is the ability to apply all the plugins and themes updates automatically.

    Earlier plugins updates could be automatically applied with the help of additional plugins. One popular plugin is Jetpack that can apply available updates automatically. Now WordPress 5.5 core supports auto-updates out of the box.

    In this article, we will discuss the auto-update feature of WordPress. For many websites, this feature can be a lifesaver but for some, there may involve some risks.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Want Social Justice? The Free Software Movement Fights For Everyone!

    Everyone wants freedom but most people have no idea just how enslaved they have become to their computing devices and the proprietary software that controls those devices. The Free Software Movement aims to spread awareness of this issue and to advocate for the use of freedom-respecting software ("free software").

  • Participate in Hacktoberfest, Help Develop Contributions

    The month-long, virtual-festival event that celebrates open source contributions, Hacktoberfest, is coming soon and members of the openSUSE community can make a difference. The event that is in its seventh year and run by Digital Ocean and DEV encourages people to make their first contributions to open source projects. The event is for developers, designers who contribute artwork, people who can contribute to documentation,and more. As the event brings more awareness to open-source projects and encourages contributions that benefit communities, having developers and community members available to help people who want to contribute can be beneficial to the project.

  • Are universities spending enough on cybersecurity? [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Such attacks “will absolutely continue”, said Mark Ford, who leads higher education risk and financial advisory services for the audit firm Deloitte. As higher education becomes known as an “easy target”, this increasingly “attracts the bad guys”, he explained.

    The threat comes not just from criminals seeking money. Universities now house arguably the most valuable secrets on earth – plans for a coronavirus vaccine – putting them in the sights of state-backed [cr]ackers. In July, UK, US and Canadian intelligence services warned that Russian groups were attempting to target Covid-19 vaccine research and development.

    This raises the question: are universities doing enough to defend themselves against [cr]acking?

  • vScaler Integrates SLURM with GigaIO FabreX for Elastic HPC Cloud Device Scaling
  • vScaler Announces SLURM integration with GigaIO FabreX

    The additional integration of the SLURM workload manager, an open-source job scheduler for Linux and Unix-like kernels, means that vScaler Cloud users can request traditional resources like memory and compute cores to be available for jobs.

  • Profiling slow-running queries in Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility)

    Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility) is a fast, scalable, highly available, and fully managed document database service that supports MongoDB workloads. You can use the same MongoDB 3.6 application code, drivers, and tools to run, manage, and scale workloads on Amazon DocumentDB without having to worry about managing the underlying infrastructure. As a document database, Amazon DocumentDB makes it easy to store, query, and index JSON data. AWS built Amazon DocumentDB to uniquely solve your challenges around availability, performance, reliability, durability, scalability, backup, and more. In doing so, we built several tools, like the profiler, to help you run analyze your workload on Amazon DocumentDB. The profiler gives you the ability to log the time and details of slow-running operations on your cluster. In this post, we show you how to use the profiler in Amazon DocumentDB to analyze slow-running queries to identify bottlenecks and improve individual query performance and overall cluster performance.

Programming Leftovers

  • Self-publishing and the 2nd edition of Ansible for DevOps

    Five years, 834 commits, and 24 major revisions later, I've just published the 2nd edition of Ansible for DevOps, a book which has now sold over 60,000 copies and spawned a popular free Ansible 101 video series on YouTube.

  • Open Standards Are Simple

    If you want to create a truly open standard, you _need_ to make it simple.

    There are no exceptions to this rule. When a standard becomes harder to fully implement than what your average motivated programmer can do in two months (max!), it _shouldn't_ be considered "open" anymore.

    Why?

  • In Which COVID-19 Misinformation Leads To A Bunch of Graphs Made With Rust

    A funny — and by funny, I mean sad — thing has happened. Recently the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has been analyzing data from the patchwork implementation of mask requirements in Kansas. They came to a conclusion that shouldn’t be surprising to anyone: masks help. They published a chart showing this. A right-wing propaganda publication got ahold of this, and claimed the numbers were “doctored” because there were two-different Y-axes. I set about to analyze the data myself from public sources, and produced graphs of various kinds using a single Y-axis and supporting the idea that the graphs were not, in fact, doctored. Here’s one graph that’s showing that: In order to do that, I had imported COVID-19 data from various public sources. Many states in the US are large enough to have significant variation in COVID-19 conditions, and many of the source people look at don’t show county-level data over time. I wanted to do that.

  • Basics of Working with the SQLite Database in Python

    A database is one of the most useful and popular files for storing data; they can be used to store any kind of data, including text, numbers, images, binary data, files, etc. SQLite is a relational database management system based on the SQL language. It is a C library, and it provides an API to work with other programming languages, including Python. It does not require a separate server process to be run as needed in large database engines like MySQL and Postgresql. It is swift and lightweight, and the entire database is stored in a single disk file, which makes it portable like CSV or other data storage files. Many applications use SQLite for internal data storage, mainly in environments like mobile devices or small applications.

  • Perl 7 By Default

    Perl 7 has been announced as the next direction of Perl development. My previous blog post explored at a high level the risks and benefits of the announced direction, as well as those of a more incremental proposal. The primary and critical difference between these two approaches is the decision to change interpreter defaults in an incompatible manner. I would like to explore each of the arguments presented for this design choice.

  • CY's Recent Submission for PWC(068-073)

    Skipped blogging on Perl Weekly Challenge(PWC) for a few weeks!

  • SSH vs. kubectl exec

    There’s a lot of similarities between SSH and kubectl, and both have their strengths and weaknesses. While SSH is architecturally set in stone, higher-level software can learn a thing or two from Kubernetes about centralized configuration when managing a fleet of machines. See Teleport for an example of how this can be done. SSH could also borrow the credential management approach from kubeconfigs (i.e. “put all my client creds and server info into one file that I can copy around”).

    kubectl could improve on its non-shell features like port forwarding and file transfer. It’s raw data throughput is also lacking, which precludes it from becoming a transport-layer protocol like SSH. In practice, these tools are complementary and get used for different tasks, it’s not “one or the other”. I hope this post helped you learn something new about both!

  • Can we do better than our C compiler?

    Today, I wanted to become a C compiler. I added a hand-compiled assembly version of echo from our previous coding exercise and added a new make target, make asm, that will assemble it. Let's look at our hand-compiled assembly and compare it to our C compiler and ask whether or not it was worth it.

  • Benign Data Races Considered Harmful

    The series of posts about so called benign data races stirred a lot of controversy and led to numerous discussions at the startup I was working at called Corensic. Two bastions formed, one claiming that no data race was benign, and the other claiming that data races were essential for performance. Then it turned out that we couldn’t even agree on the definition of a data race. In particular, the C++11 definition seemed to deviate from the established notions.

  • Micronaut 2.0 Full-Stack Java Framework Released

    The Micronaut framework uses Java's annotation processors, which work with any JVM language that supports them, as well as an HTTP server and client built on the Netty non-blocking I/O client server framework. To provide a programming model similar to Spring and Grails, these annotation processors pre-compile the required metadata to perform DI, define AOP proxies, and configure applications to run in a low-memory environment, the company says. Many of the APIs in Micronaut were "heavily inspired" by Spring and Grails," which was by design and aids in bringing developers up to speed quickly," the company says.

  • Understanding computer vision and AI, part 1

    An active area in the field of computer vision is object detection, where the goal is to not only localize objects of interest within an image but also assign a label to each of these objects of interest. Considerable recent successes in the area of object detection stem from modern advances in deep learning, particularly leveraging deep convolutional neural networks. Much of the initial focus was on improving accuracy, leading to increasingly more complex object detection networks such as SSD, R-CNN, Mask R-CNN, and other extended variants of these networks. While such networks demonstrated state-of-the-art object detection performance, they were very challenging, if not impossible, to deploy on edge and mobile devices due to computational and memory constraints. This greatly limits the widespread adoption for a wide range of applications such as robotics, video surveillance, autonomous driving where local embedded processing is required. [...] Model Evaluation is an integral part of the model development process. It helps to find the best model that represents our data and how well the chosen model performs on unseen data. To improve the model we tune the hyper-parameters; parameter that determines the network structure (number of neurons in the network, network activation functions) or training parameter (gradient descent learning rate, adding parameters like momentum in the weight update rule). Tuning those parameters is an inevitable and important step to obtain better performance. Methods like GridSearch and RandomizedSearch can be used to navigate through the different parameters.

  • Qt Design Studio 1.6 Beta released

    We are happy to announce the beta release of Qt Design Studio 1.6 Qt Design Studio is a UI design and development tool that enables designers and developers to rapidly prototype and develop complex UIs. Both designers and developers use Qt Design Studio and this makes collaboration between the two a lot simpler and more streamlined. To get an impression, you should watch this video.

Raspberry Pi Projects and News

Today in Techrights