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Saturday, 15 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC debuts AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus

TechNexion’s “Wandboard IMX8M-Plus” SBC runs Linux or Android on NXP’s new i.MX8M Plus with 2.3-TOPS NPU. Pre-orders go for $134 with 2GB RAM or $159 with 4GB and WiFi/BT, both with 32GB and M.2 with NVMe.

In January, NXP announced its i.MX8M Plus — its first i.MX8 SoC with an NPU for AI acceleration — but so far the only product we’ve seen based on it is a briefly teased Verdin iMX8M Plus module from Toradex. Now, TechNexion has opened pre-orders for a Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC based on a SODIMM-style “EDM SOM” module equipped with the i.MX8M Plus.

Read more

Also: Wandboard 8MPLUS SBC Gets NXP i.MX 8M Plus SoC with 2.3TOPS NPU

Debian Janitor: 8,200 landed changes landed so far

Filed under
Debian

The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor.

The bot has been submitting merge requests for about seven months now. The rollout has happened gradually across the Debian archive, and the bot is now enabled for all packages maintained on Salsa , GitLab , GitHub and Launchpad.

Read more

Optimised authentication methods for Ubuntu Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Still counting on passwords to protect your workstation? When set up properly, alternatives to passwords provide a streamlined user experience while significantly improving security. These alternative authentication methods can also easily be combined to create a custom and adaptive authentication profile.

This whitepaper introduces three popular authentication methods that provide a solid alternative to passwords. Perhaps you’d like to configure your laptop for login using a YubiKey hardware token connected to a dock. Another option could be to login with a Duo push notification when not connected to the dock, but use a Google Authenticator one-time password when no network is available. Maybe you need a separate hardware token just for ssh authentication, and you always need to keep a long, complex password for emergency authentication should all other methods fail. All of these scenarios can be easily configured within Ubuntu.

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Open Hardware: Arduino, RISC-V and 96Boards

Filed under
Hardware
  • Arduino-controlled robot arm is ready to play you in a game of chess

    If you’re tired of playing chess on a screen, then perhaps you could create a robotic opponent like Instructables user Michalsky. The augmented board runs micro-Max source code, enabling chess logic to be executed on an Arduino Mega with room for control functions for a 6DOF robotic arm.

    The setup uses magnetic pieces, allowing it to pick up human moves via an array of 64 reed switches underneath, along with a couple shift registers. The Mega powers the robot arm accordingly, lifting the appropriate piece and placing it on the correct square.

  • New RISC-V CTO On Open Source Chip Architecture’s Global Data Center Momentum

    With more big international players on board, the foundation's new head of technology sees signs of "state of the art moving forward."

  • Snapdragon 410 based 96Boards CE SBC gets an upgrade

    Geniatech has launched a Linux-ready, $109 “Developer Board 4 V3” compliant with 96Boards CE that offers a Snapdragon 410E, GbE, 3x USB, 802.11ac, GPS, and-25 to 70°C support.

    Geniatech has released a V3 edition of its 96Boards CE form-factor Developer Board 4 SBC, the third update of the Development Board IV we covered back in 2016. Starting at $109, the Developer Board 4 V3 still runs Linux, Android, and Windows 10 IoT Core on Qualcomm’s 1.2GHz, quad -A53 Snapdragon 410m, although it has been upgraded to the 10-year availability Snapdragon 410E. Geniatech also sells a line of Rockchip based SBCs, among other embedded products.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack and Linux Headlines

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • LHS Episode #360: Zapped

    Welcome to the 360th episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short-topic show, the hosts discuss 1.2GHz distance records, a hybrid antenna for geosynchronous satellite operation, data mode identification for your smart phone, being pwned, Ubuntu 20.04.1, LibreOffice, HamClock and much more. Thanks for listening and hope you have a great week.

  • LHS Episode #361: The Weekender LIV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • 2020-08-14 | Linux Headlines

    Google could be extending its Firefox search royalty deal, PyPy leaves the Software Freedom Conservancy, Ubuntu puts out a call for testing, Linspire removes snapd support, Microsoft showcases its open source contributions, and Facebook joins The Linux Foundation.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Django Weblog: DjangoCon Australia 2020: Schedule live and tickets on sale

    The 8th DjangoCon AU was scheduled to be run in Adelaide, South Australia this year. It's been moved to an online event and will take place on September 4th.

    DjangoCon AU is organized as a specialist track as part of PyConline AU. The schedule — though shorter than in previous years — is packed with talks about best practices, communities, contributions, and the present and future of Django.

    Since the event was due to run in Adelaide, the event is running in Australian Central Standard Time, UTC+9:30, and DjangoCon AU will start at 3:45pm ACST. This link shows when the DjangoCon AU Opening address starts for all the DjangoCon timezones..

  • Return how many times each letter shows up in the string by using an asterisk (*)

    Hello people, in this article we will solve the below python problem.

    You receive the name of a city as a string, and you need to return a string that shows how many times each letter shows up in the string by using an asterisk (*).

  • The Real Python Podcast – Episode #22: Create Cross-Platform Python GUI Apps With BeeWare

    Do you want to distribute your Python applications to other users who don't have or even use Python? Maybe you're interested in seeing your Python application run on iOS or Android mobile devices. This week on the show we have Russell Keith-Magee, the founder and maintainer of the BeeWare project. Russell talks about Briefcase, a tool that converts a Python application into native installers on macOS, Windows, Linux, and mobile devices.

  • Python vs R: Which is Good for Machine Learning?

    If you want to build a machine learning project and are stuck between choosing the right programming language to build it, you know you have come to the right place.

    This blog will not only help you understand the difference between the two languages namely: Python and R; but also help you know which language has an edge over one another in multiple aspects. So without wasting a single moment, let’s dive into it!

  • Freezegun - Real Joy for Fake Dates in Python

    If you've ever tested code involving dates and times in Python you've probably had to mock the datetime module. And if you've mocked the datetime module, at some point it probably mocked you back when your tests failed.

  • Mastering the SQLite Database in Python

    In this tutorial, we shall see some advanced tasks associated with the SQLite database from Python. We shall see topics such as inserting images, Listing the tables, Backup a database, Dumping Rollback in SQLite, Deleting records from a table, Dropping a table, SQLite database exceptions, and more.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 6 Blog Post
  • Top 10 Important Uses cases of Python in the Real World

    These top 10 Python uses cases in the real world prove how effective the programming language is. Read the real life uses of Python and implement it in your organization.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The modern developer experience

    We hear from many clients that developer productivity and efficiency continue to be pain points. Cloud adoption can help normalize developer experiences across application stacks and runtimes. The path and steps for your developers to push code should be clear, simple, and easy to implement, even on Day 1.

    The modern developer experience provides a unified and normalized practice with modern tools. Developers thrive in the inner loop where unit tests and code come together, and in a penalty-free runtime execution environment where no one gets hurt, no processes take down precious workloads, and no one knows that it took 20 minutes to resolve that pesky runtime error. The inner loop occurs in a developer workspace that is easy to set up, manage, prepare, maintain, and, more importantly, easy to allocate. If a new developer is added to your squad, they can have all of the mechanical things they need to push code changes into the pipeline on their first day.

    An important part of the modern developer experience is expressed as Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, which provides a set of constructs to provision a developer workspace in the cloud where they can perform their inner loop. A save action to a workspace file initiates an inner loop build in their local workspace, and an endpoint for the developer to see their changes quickly.

  • Call for Code Daily: Grillo, and how your code can help

    The power of Call for Code® is in the global community that we have built around this major #TechforGood initiative. Whether it is the deployments that are underway across pivotal projects, developers leveraging the starter kits in the cloud, or ecosystem partners joining the fight, everyone has a story to tell. Call for Code Daily highlights all the amazing #TechforGood stories taking place around the world. Every day, you can count on us to share these stories with you. Check out the stories from the week of August 10th:

  • Culture of Innovation and Collaboration: Hybrid Cloud, Privacy in AI and Data Caching

    Red Hat is continually innovating and part of that innovation includes researching and striving to solve the problems our customers face. That innovation is driven through the Office of the CTO and includes OpenShift, OpenShift Container Storage and use cases such as the hybrid cloud, privacy concerns in AI, and data caching. We recently interviewed Hugh Brock, research director for the office of the CTO, here at Red Hat about these very topics.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-33

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Fedora 33 has branched from Rawhide. Please update the Release Readiness page with your team’s status.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora Magazine: Come test a new release of pipenv, the Python development tool

    Pipenv is a tool that helps Python developers maintain isolated virtual environments with specifacally defined set of dependencies to achieve reproducible development and deployment environments. It is similar to tools for different programming languages, such as bundler, composer, npm, cargo, yarn, etc.

    A new version of pipenv, 2020.6.2, has been recently released. It is now available in Fedora 33 and rawhide. For older Fedoras, the maintainers decided to package it in COPR to be tested first. So come try it out, before they push it into stable Fedora versions. The new version doesn’t bring any fancy new features, but after two years of development it fixes a lot of problems and does many things differently under the hood. What worked for you previously should continue to work, but might behave slightly differently.

  • Introduction to cloud-native CI/CD with Tekton (KubeCon Europe 2020)

    If you’re interested in cloud-native CI/CD and Tekton but haven’t had a chance to get hands-on with the technology yet, the KubeCon Europe Virtual event provides an opportunity to do that. Tekton is a powerful and flexible open source framework for creating cloud-native CI/CD pipelines. It integrates with Kubernetes and allows developers to build, test, and deploy across multiple cloud providers and on-premises clusters as shown in Figure 1.

  • Introduction to Strimzi: Apache Kafka on Kubernetes (KubeCon Europe 2020)

    Apache Kafka has emerged as the leading platform for building real-time data pipelines. Born as a messaging system, mainly for the publish/subscribe pattern, Kafka has established itself as a data-streaming platform for processing data in real-time. Today, Kafka is also heavily used for developing event-driven applications, enabling the services in your infrastructure to communicate with each other through events using Apache Kafka as the backbone. Meanwhile, cloud-native application development is gathering more traction thanks to Kubernetes.

    Thanks to the abstraction layer provided by this platform, it’s easy to move your applications from running on bare metal to any cloud provider (AWS, Azure, GCP, IBM, and so on) enabling hybrid-cloud scenarios as well. But how do you move your Apache Kafka workloads to the cloud? It’s possible, but it’s not simple. You could learn all of the Apache Kafka tools for handling a cluster well enough to move your Kafka workloads to Kubernetes, or you could leverage the Kubernetes knowledge you already have using Strimzi.

  • OpenShift for Kubernetes developers: Getting started

    If you are familiar with containers and Kubernetes, you have likely heard of the enterprise features that Red Hat OpenShift brings to this platform. In this article, I introduce developers familiar with Kubernetes to OpenShift’s command-line features and native extension API resources, including build configurations, deployment configurations, and image streams.

  • Man-DB Brings Documentation to IBM i

    IBM i developers who have a question about how a particular command or feature works in open source packages now have an easy way to look up documentations, thanks to the addition of support for the Man-DB utility in IBM i, which IBM unveiled in late July.

    Man-DB is an open source implementation of the standard Unix documentation system. It provides a mechanism for easily accessing the documentation that exists for open source packages, such as the Node.js language, or even for commands, like Curl.

    The software, which can be installed via YUM, only works with open source software on IBM i at the moment; it doesn’t support native programs or commands.

  • Making open decisions in five steps

    The group's leader made a decision, and everyone else accepted it. The leader may have been a manager, a team lead, or the alpha in a social group. Was that decision the best one for the group? Did it take all relevant factors into account? It didn’t really matter, because people didn’t want to buck authority and face the ramifications. But this behavior was typical of life in hierarchical systems.

  • 7 tips for giving and receiving better feedback

Wine 5.15 and Beyond

Filed under
Software

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.15 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Initial implementation of the XACT Engine libraries.
      - Beginnings of a math library in MSVCRT based on Musl.
      - Still more restructuration of the console support.
      - Direct Input performance improvements.
      - Exception handling fixes on x86-64.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    
    
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
    
    
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.15.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.15.tar.xz
    
    
    
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
    
    
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    
    
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    
    
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    
    
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.15 Release Brings Initial Work On XACT Engine Libraries

    Wine 5.15 is out as the latest bi-weekly development snapshot for this program allowing Windows games/applications to generally run quite gracefully on Linux and other platforms. 

  •        

  • Wine Developer Begins Experimenting With macOS ARM64 Support

    Over the months ahead with Apple preparing future desktops/laptops with their in-house Apple silicon built on the ARM 64-bit architecture, Wine developers are beginning to eye how to support these future 64-bit ARM systems with macOS Big Sur. 

    Wine developer Martin Storsjo has been experimenting with the macOS + ARM64 support and has got the code along far enough that "small test executables" can run on the patched copy of Wine. 

Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC debuts AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus

Filed under
Hardware

echNexion’s “Wandboard IMX8M-Plus” SBC runs Linux or Android on NXP’s new i.MX8M Plus with 2.3-TOPS NPU. Pre-orders go for $134 with 2GB RAM or $159 with 4GB and WiFi/BT, both with 32GB and M.2 with NVMe.

In January, NXP announced its i.MX8M Plus — its first i.MX8 SoC with an NPU for AI acceleration — but so far the only product we’ve seen based on it is a briefly teased Verdin iMX8M Plus module from Toradex. Now, TechNexion has opened pre-orders for a Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC based on a SODIMM-style “EDM SOM” module equipped with the i.MX8M Plus.

Read more

Kernel: Linux 5.9 Changes and Linux Plumbers Passes

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.9 Brings Safeguard Following NVIDIA's Recent "GPL Condom" Incident

    Stemming from the recent discussions over NVIDIA NetGPU code that relied on another shim for interfacing between NVIDIA's proprietary driver and the open-source kernel code, a new patch is on the way for Linux 5.9 to fight back against such efforts.

    As a result of that "NetGPU" code patch series and the ensuing discussion, longtime kernel developer Christoph Hellwig followed through with a set of kernel patches to tighten up access to kernel symbols exported as GPL-only and are frequently used by these open-source "shim" drivers to sit between the open-source kernel code and the binary kernel modules. This situation also known as the "GPL condom" defense is working to be better avoided with Linux 5.9+ kernels.

  • Linux 5.9 Dropping Xen 32-bit PV Guest Support

    Back in Linux 5.4 Xen 32-bit PV guest support was deprecated while now for Linux 5.9 it's set to be removed entirely. Last year's deprecation comes with the 32-bit usage dwindling in general but PVH being preferred to PV, Meltdown mitigations not being present, and the code not seeing much activity. Now for Linux 5.9 that support is being gutted.

  • Final passes for sale for Linux Plumbers

    We hit our registration cap again and have added a few more passes. The final date for purchasing passes is August 19th at 11:59pm PST. If the passes sell out before then we will not be adding more. Thank you all once again for your enthusiasm and we look forward to seeing you August 24-28!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Want Social Justice? The Free Software Movement Fights For Everyone!

    Everyone wants freedom but most people have no idea just how enslaved they have become to their computing devices and the proprietary software that controls those devices. The Free Software Movement aims to spread awareness of this issue and to advocate for the use of freedom-respecting software ("free software").

  • Participate in Hacktoberfest, Help Develop Contributions

    The month-long, virtual-festival event that celebrates open source contributions, Hacktoberfest, is coming soon and members of the openSUSE community can make a difference.

    The event that is in its seventh year and run by Digital Ocean and DEV encourages people to make their first contributions to open source projects.

    The event is for developers, designers who contribute artwork, people who can contribute to documentation,and more.

    As the event brings more awareness to open-source projects and encourages contributions that benefit communities, having developers and community members available to help people who want to contribute can be beneficial to the project.

  • Are universities spending enough on cybersecurity? [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Such attacks “will absolutely continue”, said Mark Ford, who leads higher education risk and financial advisory services for the audit firm Deloitte. As higher education becomes known as an “easy target”, this increasingly “attracts the bad guys”, he explained.

    The threat comes not just from criminals seeking money. Universities now house arguably the most valuable secrets on earth – plans for a coronavirus vaccine – putting them in the sights of state-backed [cr]ackers. In July, UK, US and Canadian intelligence services warned that Russian groups were attempting to target Covid-19 vaccine research and development.

    This raises the question: are universities doing enough to defend themselves against [cr]acking?

  • vScaler Integrates SLURM with GigaIO FabreX for Elastic HPC Cloud Device Scaling
  • vScaler Announces SLURM integration with GigaIO FabreX

    The additional integration of the SLURM workload manager, an open-source job scheduler for Linux and Unix-like kernels, means that vScaler Cloud users can request traditional resources like memory and compute cores to be available for jobs.

  • Profiling slow-running queries in Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility)

    Amazon DocumentDB (with MongoDB compatibility) is a fast, scalable, highly available, and fully managed document database service that supports MongoDB workloads. You can use the same MongoDB 3.6 application code, drivers, and tools to run, manage, and scale workloads on Amazon DocumentDB without having to worry about managing the underlying infrastructure. As a document database, Amazon DocumentDB makes it easy to store, query, and index JSON data.

    AWS built Amazon DocumentDB to uniquely solve your challenges around availability, performance, reliability, durability, scalability, backup, and more. In doing so, we built several tools, like the profiler, to help you run analyze your workload on Amazon DocumentDB. The profiler gives you the ability to log the time and details of slow-running operations on your cluster. In this post, we show you how to use the profiler in Amazon DocumentDB to analyze slow-running queries to identify bottlenecks and improve individual query performance and overall cluster performance.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Self-publishing and the 2nd edition of Ansible for DevOps

    Five years, 834 commits, and 24 major revisions later, I've just published the 2nd edition of Ansible for DevOps, a book which has now sold over 60,000 copies and spawned a popular free Ansible 101 video series on YouTube.

  • Open Standards Are Simple

    If you want to create a truly open standard, you _need_ to make it simple.

    There are no exceptions to this rule. When a standard becomes harder to fully implement than what your average motivated programmer can do in two months (max!), it _shouldn't_ be considered "open" anymore.

    Why?

  • In Which COVID-19 Misinformation Leads To A Bunch of Graphs Made With Rust

    A funny — and by funny, I mean sad — thing has happened. Recently the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) has been analyzing data from the patchwork implementation of mask requirements in Kansas. They came to a conclusion that shouldn’t be surprising to anyone: masks help. They published a chart showing this. A right-wing propaganda publication got ahold of this, and claimed the numbers were “doctored” because there were two-different Y-axes.

    I set about to analyze the data myself from public sources, and produced graphs of various kinds using a single Y-axis and supporting the idea that the graphs were not, in fact, doctored. Here’s one graph that’s showing that:

    In order to do that, I had imported COVID-19 data from various public sources. Many states in the US are large enough to have significant variation in COVID-19 conditions, and many of the source people look at don’t show county-level data over time. I wanted to do that.

  • Basics of Working with the SQLite Database in Python

    A database is one of the most useful and popular files for storing data; they can be used to store any kind of data, including text, numbers, images, binary data, files, etc. SQLite is a relational database management system based on the SQL language. It is a C library, and it provides an API to work with other programming languages, including Python. It does not require a separate server process to be run as needed in large database engines like MySQL and Postgresql.

    It is swift and lightweight, and the entire database is stored in a single disk file, which makes it portable like CSV or other data storage files. Many applications use SQLite for internal data storage, mainly in environments like mobile devices or small applications.

  • Perl 7 By Default

    Perl 7 has been announced as the next direction of Perl development. My previous blog post explored at a high level the risks and benefits of the announced direction, as well as those of a more incremental proposal. The primary and critical difference between these two approaches is the decision to change interpreter defaults in an incompatible manner. I would like to explore each of the arguments presented for this design choice.

  • CY's Recent Submission for PWC(068-073)

    Skipped blogging on Perl Weekly Challenge(PWC) for a few weeks!

  • SSH vs. kubectl exec

    There’s a lot of similarities between SSH and kubectl, and both have their strengths and weaknesses. While SSH is architecturally set in stone, higher-level software can learn a thing or two from Kubernetes about centralized configuration when managing a fleet of machines. See Teleport for an example of how this can be done. SSH could also borrow the credential management approach from kubeconfigs (i.e. “put all my client creds and server info into one file that I can copy around”).

    kubectl could improve on its non-shell features like port forwarding and file transfer. It’s raw data throughput is also lacking, which precludes it from becoming a transport-layer protocol like SSH. In practice, these tools are complementary and get used for different tasks, it’s not “one or the other”. I hope this post helped you learn something new about both!

  • Can we do better than our C compiler?

    Today, I wanted to become a C compiler. I added a hand-compiled assembly version of echo from our previous coding exercise and added a new make target, make asm, that will assemble it. Let's look at our hand-compiled assembly and compare it to our C compiler and ask whether or not it was worth it.

  • Benign Data Races Considered Harmful

    The series of posts about so called benign data races stirred a lot of controversy and led to numerous discussions at the startup I was working at called Corensic. Two bastions formed, one claiming that no data race was benign, and the other claiming that data races were essential for performance. Then it turned out that we couldn’t even agree on the definition of a data race. In particular, the C++11 definition seemed to deviate from the established notions.

  • Micronaut 2.0 Full-Stack Java Framework Released

    The Micronaut framework uses Java's annotation processors, which work with any JVM language that supports them, as well as an HTTP server and client built on the Netty non-blocking I/O client server framework. To provide a programming model similar to Spring and Grails, these annotation processors pre-compile the required metadata to perform DI, define AOP proxies, and configure applications to run in a low-memory environment, the company says. Many of the APIs in Micronaut were "heavily inspired" by Spring and Grails," which was by design and aids in bringing developers up to speed quickly," the company says.

  • Understanding computer vision and AI, part 1

    An active area in the field of computer vision is object detection, where the goal is to not only localize objects of interest within an image but also assign a label to each of these objects of interest. Considerable recent successes in the area of object detection stem from modern advances in deep learning, particularly leveraging deep convolutional neural networks. Much of the initial focus was on improving accuracy, leading to increasingly more complex object detection networks such as SSD, R-CNN, Mask R-CNN, and other extended variants of these networks. While such networks demonstrated state-of-the-art object detection performance, they were very challenging, if not impossible, to deploy on edge and mobile devices due to computational and memory constraints. This greatly limits the widespread adoption for a wide range of applications such as robotics, video surveillance, autonomous driving where local embedded processing is required.

    [...]

    Model Evaluation is an integral part of the model development process. It helps to find the best model that represents our data and how well the chosen model performs on unseen data.

    To improve the model we tune the hyper-parameters; parameter that determines the network structure (number of neurons in the network, network activation functions) or training parameter (gradient descent learning rate, adding parameters like momentum in the weight update rule). Tuning those parameters is an inevitable and important step to obtain better performance. Methods like GridSearch and RandomizedSearch can be used to navigate through the different parameters.

  • Qt Design Studio 1.6 Beta released

    We are happy to announce the beta release of Qt Design Studio 1.6

    Qt Design Studio is a UI design and development tool that enables designers and developers to rapidly prototype and develop complex UIs. Both designers and developers use Qt Design Studio and this makes collaboration between the two a lot simpler and more streamlined. To get an impression, you should watch this video.

Raspberry Pi Projects and News

Filed under
Hardware

LibreOffice 6.4.5 finally for Slackware 14.2

Filed under
LibO
Slack

The Document Foundation recently released version 7.0.0 of their Libre Office suite of applications. The packages for Slackware-current can be found in my repository. But the situation for Slackware 14.2 used to be different – I got stuck after LibreOffice 6.2 because the newer source releases (6.3 and onwards) require versions of system software that our stable Slackware 14.2 platform does not offer.

From time to time during the last year, when there was time and the build box was not compiling packages, I messed around with the libreoffice.SlackBuild script in futile attempts to compile recent versions of LibreOffice on Slackware 14.2. I failed all the time.
Until last week. After I had uploaded the new KDE Plasma5 packages to ‘ktown‘, I had an epiphany and decided to use a new approach. What I did was: question all the historic stuff in the SlackBuild script that got added whenever I needed to work around compilation failures; and accept that the compilation needs newer versions of software than Slackware 14.2 offers. The first statement meant that I disabled patches and variable declarations that messed with compiler and linker; and for the second statement I stuck to a single guideline: the end product, if I were able to compile a package successfully, has to run out of the box on Slackware 14.2 without the need to update any of the core Slackware packages.

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