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MagicMirror: a versatile home information hub

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Back in 2014, a Raspberry Pi enthusiast by the name of Michael Teeuw shared his build of a "magic mirror" with the world in a six-part series. The system consisted of a Raspberry Pi and monitor running a web browser in kiosk mode, with a web server that provided a dashboard interface — all stored in a custom-built case with a one-way mirror. Since his post, others around the world have built these devices for their home (including myself), forming both a community and an interesting open-source project. The recent release of MagicMirror2 (MM2) version 2.12.0 gives us an opportunity to learn more about where the project started and where it is today.

The MM2 project provides the software to convert what would otherwise be a normal household mirror into a valuable source of information. This information could take the form of drive times, train schedules, daily news, server loads, sports scores, or even the feed from the doorbell when someone is at the door. With the right know-how, the surface can even become interactive through the use of hand gestures or as a touchscreen.

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Kali Linux: Win-KeX Version 2.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

We have been humbled by the amazing response to our recent launch of Win-KeX. After its initial release, we asked ourselves if that is truly the limit of what we can achieve or could we pull off something incredible to mark the 25th anniversary of Hackers? What about “a second concurrent session as root”, “seamless desktop integration with Windows”, or – dare we dream – “sound”?

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Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • SDF record walkthrough

    In this essay I'll walk through the major parts of a simple V2000 SDFile record.

    Richard Apodaca summarized the SDfile format a few months ago, with details I won't cover here. You should read it for more background.

    Bear in mind that the variety of names for this format name leads to some confusion. It's often called an SDF file, which technically means structure-data file file, in the same way that PIN number technically means personal identification number number. I tend to write SD file, but the term in the documentation is SDFile.

  • I Want to Learn Programming but I Don’t Know Where to Start

    Software development is a challenging and lucrative career option. Our daily utility items — light bulbs, televisions, cars, banking, shopping — everything is driven by intelligent pieces of codes.

    If you want to learn programming but do not know where to start, you have come to the right blog. I have compiled a step-by-step guide that will get you started on your software development journey and eliminate your apprehensions.

  • Handling the SDF record delimiter

    In this essay I'll point out a common difficulty people have when trying to identify the end of an SDFile record.

  • Stack Abuse: Kernel Density Estimation in Python Using Scikit-Learn

    This article is an introduction to kernel density estimation using Python's machine learning library scikit-learn.

    Kernel density estimation (KDE) is a non-parametric method for estimating the probability density function of a given random variable. It is also referred to by its traditional name, the Parzen-Rosenblatt Window method, after its discoverers.

  • How to Create a Python Hello World Program

    There is a major difference between python 2 and python 3. For instance, one difference is the print statement. In python 2, the print statement is not a function. It is considered as a simple statement. Whenever we use the print statement in python 2, we do not use the parenthesis. On the other hand in python 3, print is a function and it is followed by the parenthesis.

    In any programming language, the simplest “Hello World” program is used to demonstrate the syntax of the programming language. In this article, we create the “Hello World” program in python 3. Spyder3 editor is used to creating and running the python script.

Mozilla: PGP in Thunderbird, Departures, Firefox Send and Firefox Notes

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Thunderbird implements PGP crypto feature requested 21 years ago

    Mozilla's mail reader Thunderbird has implemented a feature first requested 21 years ago.

    The somewhat garbled request – "I'd appreciate a plugin for PGP to ede and encrypt PGP crypted messages directly in Mozilla" [sic] – appears to have gone unimplemented due to concerns about US laws that bar export of encryption, debate about whether PGP was the right way to do crypto, and other matters besides.

    Thunderbird eventually chose to use Enigmail and its implementation of OpenPGP public key email encryption. However, it was an add-on rather than integrated. Commenters in the Bugzilla thread stemming from the request kept the dream of an integrated solution alive, though.

    Then in October 2019, the Thunderbird blog announced that Thunderbird 78 "will add built-in functionality for email encryption and digital signatures using the OpenPGP standard."

    Thunderbird 78 emerged in July 2020, and late in August Thunderbird contributor Kai Engert (:KaiE:) posted: "We have released support for OpenPGP email in Thunderbird version 78.2.1. Marking fixed."

  • Upcoming US Holidays (for Mike Taylor)

    This is my last full week at Mozilla, with my last day being Monday, September 21. It’s been just over 7 years since I joined (some of them were really great, and others were fine, I guess).

  • Update on Firefox Send and Firefox Notes

    As Mozilla tightens and refines its product focus in 2020, today we are announcing the end of life for two legacy services that grew out of the Firefox Test Pilot program: Firefox Send and Firefox Notes. Both services are being decommissioned and will no longer be a part of our product family. Details and timelines are discussed below.

    Firefox Send was a promising tool for encrypted file sharing. Send garnered good reach, a loyal audience, and real signs of value throughout its life. Unfortunately, some abusive users were beginning to use Send to ship malware and conduct spear phishing attacks. This summer we took Firefox Send offline to address this challenge.

    In the intervening period, as we weighed the cost of our overall portfolio and strategic focus, we made the decision not to relaunch the service. Because the service is already offline, no major changes in status are expected. You can read more here.

  • Mozilla Browser Extension to Track YouTube Recommendations

    It’s easy to get caught up in YouTube as it recommends an endless array of videos, with each one offering you more of the same type of content. But it’s not always the same content. Sometimes the process gets convoluted, and you wind up watching something you have no interest in. Mozilla is curious why this happens and created a browser extension to track YouTube recommendations.

10 Best Open-source Self-hosted Collaborative Text Editors Alternative to Google Docs

Filed under
Server
OSS

Collaborative writing is a term referred to team and group of writers involving in writing and editing the same document or writing project.

The project can be an essay, a technical documentation, a book or a research paper.

When groups and teams members join together in a writing project, They often face the challenge of choosing a tool.

Are you a researcher, book writer or a novelist? Maybe you are a technical writer or a software developer who works with a team. It's essential for you and your team to choose the right tool for the job. So according to your use-case what's your best option? That's what we are trying to answer in this article.

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GNU/Linux-Compatible Devices and Open Hardware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Microchip SAMD21 Machine Learning Evaluation Kits Work with Cartesiam, Edge Impulse and Motion Gestures Solutions

    While it all started in the cloud Artificial Intelligence is now moving at the very edge is ultra-low power nodes, and Microchip has launched two SAMD21 Arm Cortex-M0+ machine learning evaluation kits that now work with AI/ML solutions from Cartesiam, Edge Impulse, and Motion Gestures.

    Bot machine learning evaluation kits come with SAMD21G18 Arm Cortex-M0+ 32-bit MCU, an on-board debugger (nEDBG), an ATECC608A CryptoAuthentication secure element, ATWINC1510 Wi-Fi network controller, as well as Microchip MCP9808 high accuracy temperature sensor and a light sensor. But EV45Y33A development kit is equipped with an add-on board featuring Bosch’s BMI160 low-power Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), while EV18H79A features an add-on board with TDK InvenSense ICM-42688-P 6-axis MEMS.

  • 3µA/MHz Ambiq Apollo 4 MCU Targets Battery-powered IoT Devices with Voice Processing

    Ambiq Micro is using sub-threshold voltages under 0.5V to offer ultra-low-power Arm microcontrollers. In 2015, the company launch the Apollo Cortex-M4F MCU with 30µA/MHz power consumption in active mode, which was followed in 2016 by Apollo 2 in consuming just 10µA/MHz, and Apollo 3 (Blue) dropped power consumption to as low as 6µA/MHz against using a Cortex-M4F @ 48 MHz in active mode.

  • SBC and HMI starter kit run Linux on i.MX6 ULL

    Artila’s “SBC-7530” runs Linux 5.4 on an i.MX6 ULL with WiFi, 2x 10/100 LAN, 3x USB, 2x RS-485, 2x CAN, mini-PCIe with micro-SIM, and an optional starter kit with 7-inch touchscreen.

    Taiwan-based Artila Electronics, which is known for its Matrix line of low-power, compact IoT gateways, has launched its first SBC in 12 years. The i.MX6 ULL-equipped SBC-7530 follows its circa-2008 M-508 SBC, which is based on an ARM9-based Atmel (now Microchip) AT91RM9200.

  • Industrial panel PC is an IP69 neat freak

    Adlink’s IP69-protected “Titan-AL” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on Apollo Lake and is available with 15.6-, 21.5-, and 23.8-inch HD capacitive touchscreens in either VESA with M12 or pipe-mount configurations.

    Adlink has added an Intel Apollo Lake based panel PC to its Titan Panel Computer series that adheres to IP69 water and dust-proofing protections. The Titan-AL follows Adlink’s similarly IP69-protected Penta Food-C15/C17/C19 IP69K, which is aimed specifically at food processing operations and runs on an older Atom D2550. Other IP69 protected panel PCs include TechNexion’s i.MX6 based, 10.1-inch TWP-1010-IMX6 and Wincomm’s Skylake-based, 15-, 19-, and 22-inch WTP-9E66.

  • Compact module runs on Ryzen V1000

    Axiomtek’s Linux-ready “CEM130” COM Express Compact Type 6 module provides a Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC with up to 32GB DDR4 and support for quad displays, 2x SATA, 7x PCIe, 9x USB, and -20 to 60°C operation.

    Axiomtek, which has previously tapped AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC in a 3.5-inch CAPA13R SBC and DSP600-211 signage player, has now returned with a COM Express Compact Type 6 module. The CEM130 joins other V1000-equipped, 95 x 95mm Compact Type 6 modules such as Arbor’s EmETXe-a10M0 and Kontron’s COMe-cVR6.

  • New COM Express Type 6 Compact Module Compatible with Windows 10 and Linux Operating Systems
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  • Monitor water quality anywhere in the world with WaterAid

    Clean water is one of our most precious resources, but identifying sources of pollution often means expensive equipment. This can also mean taking multiple water quality readings and somehow aggregating them together to be easily usable. As a solution to both problems, Andrei Florian has developed WaterAid — which was recently named a finalist in this year’s Hackaday Prize.

    WaterAid consists of a measurement unit that senses water pH, turbidity, and temperature, as well as atmospheric temperature and humidity. Data is relayed to the system’s backend via a cellular connection, using an onboard MKR GSM 1400. Collected information from one or more devices is then displayed on a Soracom Lagoon dashboard for water monitoring from anywhere in the world!

    Not only can a fleet of WaterAids be used to continuously track a river, lake, or any other body of water, but individuals looking to get immediate feedback on quality can utilize the portable tool’s NeoPixel ring for color-coded judgement.

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  • A MKR ZERO-based volume controller for your PC

    While some keyboards provide media keys or even knobs to adjust your overall computer sound up and down, often what you really want is the ability to tune program volumes separately. To make this extremely easy, SNR Tech Bytes has come up with a beautifully-designed controller, which runs on the MKR ZERO.

    The device features five encoders to individually tune the master volume, Discord, Chrome, gaming, and Spotify, with the help of software on the PC itself. Encoder button mutes each channel as needed, using NeoPixels below to indicate each status.

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  • How is computing taught in schools around the world?

             

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  • Build an arcade cabinet | Hackspace 35

             

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    nut – testing shutdown and startup

                     

                       

    Based on this, I’m confident the rack will properly shutdown when the power fails. Just as important, it will come back when the power returns.

Adventures of porting postmarketOS to the Librem 5

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

I’ve been longing to drop the shackles of Android ever since I made the decision to stop using my Nokia N900. Nokia had given up on Linux phones, and it was clear that there would be no further security patches for my favorite smartphone of all time. Shaking Google out of Android had been my mission for years, and I had resorted to running my own builds of “de-Googled” LineageOS. I was longing for something better. I was out of the country when I first read about postmarketOS (“pmOS”) in May 2017. postmarketOS is a Linux distribution based on Alpine Linux, that strives to provide a Linux distribution running the mainline Linux kernel, as a means to revive old smartphones long forgotten by their manufacturers. My beloved N900 was one device with (rough) support! I quickly jumped on eBay to order a second N900 to meet me at home when I arrived back, because obviously two are needed. Obviously… Thus began my relationship with postmarketOS, one that continues to this day.

Things were not all rosy though… After some time it became clear that the older N900 CPU wasn’t going to get any faster for running “modern” applications and that there would never be a free userspace graphics driver for its GPU, so I was quite excited when I first learned about the Librem 5. Sure, it didn’t have a physical slide-out keyboard, but the promise of a device from a company that would treat Linux support as a first-class citizen was too good to pass up. I promptly pre-ordered a developer kit (“devkit”) and phone, with the full intention of porting postmarketOS to the device and eventually using it full time to replace the heaping pile of Android in my pocket.

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LibreOffice: Yaru, Promotion and Locale-independent Writer Templates

Filed under
LibO
  • The best LibreOffice extensions. Yaru icon theme

    Paul Kepinski made a new nice LibreOffice icon theme. Its name is Yaru. He wanted include it into LibreOffice source code, but then he made an extension and now you can download it by the link. Just enjoy!

  • Spread the word – add LibreOffice to your email signature!

    Love LibreOffice? Want to let more people know about it? An effective (and easy) way is to add a mention of the software to your email signature. This is the piece of text that’s automatically added to emails that you send, and typically includes some information about your job, or other contact details.

    Many people also use their email signatures (aka “sigs”) to spread the word about causes they support – such as free and open source software projects. So, you could use your signature to raise awareness about LibreOffice, for instance! When people read your emails, if they also check out the signature, they’ll learn something.

  • Locale-independent Writer templates

    Users create new documents in various ways. When they do so in Online or via Windows Explorer’s context menu (New → …) then actual templates are not involved in the process, technically. What happens instead is that there is a plain empty Writer (or Calc, Impress) document that gets copied. The reason for this is that by the time the document gets created, the WOPI-like protocol or Windows Explorer doesn’t have a running soffice process to create a document instance from a template: it’ll just copy a file.

Screencasts and Audiocasts/Shows

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Manjaro 20.1 XFCE Edition overview | #FREE OPERATING SYSTEM.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Manjaro 20.1 XFCE Edition and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • The Real Python Podcast – Episode #27: Preparing for an Interview With Python Practice Problems

    What is an effective way to prepare for a Python interview? Would you like a set of problems that increase in difficulty to practice and hone your Python skills? This week on the show, we have Jim Anderson to talk about his new Real Python article, “Python Practice Problems: Get Ready for Your Next Interview.” This article provides several problems, which include skeleton code, unit tests, and solutions for you to compare your work.

    David Amos also joins us this week, and he has brought another batch of PyCoder’s Weekly articles and projects from the Python community. We cover these topics: Structural Pattern Matching, Common Python Data Structures, A Tax Attorney Uses Python, Discover the Role of Python in Space Exploration, and Five Pairs of Magic Methods in Python That You Should Know.

  • Force Students To Run Spyware To Stop Cheating In Online Exams

    Ever since everyone started working remotely more of these online exam proctoring tools and monitoring tools have been popping up and I thought wouldn't it be fun to go and see how they plan to stop cheating and even better how fundamentally flawed this plan actually is. Almost 100% of people who do an online exam will cheat, and cheating should be expected if you don't like that then don't hold an online exam.

  • Normalizing Surveillance

    Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, and Petros Koutoupis talk about Amazon's Alexa for landlords program.

    Show notes:

    00:00:23 For starters, let's begin with Normalization of Surveillance.
    00:50:00 Amazon Alexa for landlords.
    00:10:15 Is this really jus another way to discover new markets?
    00:19:03 Doc the mechanic?!
    00:27:49 If you're young do you really not care about privacy?
    00:30:49 A couple of things that will clue people on privacy, are: Health data, and political issues

  • "Hey, DT. You Need A Better Studio!" (Plus Other Comments I Get)

    In this lengthy rant video, I address a few questions and comments that I've been receiving from viewers. I discuss alternatives to the Ubuntu Software Center, alternatives to the term "proprietary garbage", what software you should install alongside your window managers in Arch Linux, VirtualBox versus Virt-Manager, and my recording setup and why I need a proper studio.

Linux Mint Cinnamon Vs. MATE: which one to choose?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Mint is by far one of the most popular Linux distros on the market, especially among Windows users who are jumping into the Linux bandwagon. This is mostly because Linux Mint comes with a familiar desktop environment that resembles the classic Windows desktop. It offers tons of quality of life features, making it very user-friendly for users who have never tried Linux before.

Since Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, you get access to the largest Linux community to help you out with all your problems and issues.

With that being said, when you got to download the Linux Mint ISO, you will be presented with three desktop environments to choose from.

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Terminal Image Viewer – display images in a terminal

Filed under
GNU
Linux

One of our favorite adages is “A picture is worth a thousand words”. It refers to the notion that a still image can convey a complex idea. Images can portray a lot of information quickly and more efficiently than text. They capture memories, and never let you forget something you want to remember, and refresh it in your memory.

Images are part of every day internet usage, and are particularly important for social media engagement. A good image viewer is an essential part of any operating system.

Terminal Image Viewer is different from the majority of image viewers. It’s a tiny C++ program (under 650 lines of code) that displays images in a terminal by outputting RGB ANSI codes and Unicode block graphic characters.

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Todoist is Now Available on GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

FossMint has a good list of unique-style quality organization applications with titles such as Copyu, Takswarrior, and Zenkit ToDo but there is one app that has been far away from the reach of Linux users and we are excited to announce that it is finally available for users across the GNU/Linux platform.

Todoist is a task and project management app designed to enable users to reliably keep track of their tasks as well as to arrange, analyze, plan, and collaborate on projects in an easy manner.

Until the company released an electron wrapper version that can run on Linux platforms, Todoist was not available to most of the open-source enthusiasts. The good thing is that now that it is available as an Electron app, so are all the features! What is also cool is its ability to work offline so users can take it wherever they go in their pockets or rucksacks.

As a freemium productivity app, you will find working Todoist a breeze because of its sleek ad and clutter-free UI. The free plan allows as many as up to 5 people per project for a total of 8 projects.

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Software Freedom Day 2020: Software Freedom is More Important than Ever

Filed under
GNU
OSS

“For more than a century we’ve seen examples of how sharing, making ideas, products and projects available to modify, expand and rework has resulted in better technology”

Open source and Free Software are now synonymous with the software industry, which is still a relatively new area of computing, all things considered, writes Jan Wildeboer, EMEA open source evangelist, Red Hat. However, the earliest known “open source” initiative dates back to 1911 when Henry Ford launched a group that saw US car manufacturers sharing technology openly, without monetary benefit. Similarly, in the 1950s Volvo decided to keep the design patent open for its three-point seatbelt for other car manufacturers to use for free.

In universities, in big companies and public organisations, sharing software was the norm. Computers were very expensive, specialised and the majority of software was developed more or less from scratch to solve specific issues. Over the years, computers became more ubiquitous and standardised, so software could be separated from the hardware. This gave way to pure software companies that decided they needed to protect their source code of their products. Proprietary software became the norm.

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10 Useful Alternatives to the Top Utility

Filed under
Software

The top utility will need little introduction to seasoned Linux users. top is a small utility that offers a dynamic real-time view of a running system.

It allows users to monitor the processes that are running on a system. top has two main sections, with the first showing general system information such as the amount of time the system has been up, load averages, the number of running and sleeping tasks, as well as information on memory and swap usage.

The second main section displays an ordered list of processes and their process ID number, the user who owns the process, the amount of resources the process is consuming (processor and memory), as well as the running time of that process.

Some versions of top offer extensive customization of the display, such as choice of columns or sorting method.

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Myriad X-equipped machine vision camera runs Ubuntu on Apollo Lake

Filed under
Ubuntu

Adlink’s “NEON-1000-MDX Smart Camera” runs Ubuntu 18.04 on an Intel Apollo Lake SoC with a Myriad X VPU supported by Intel OpenVINO and Adlink’s Edge vision software. Four camera options are available from 1.2 to 5MP.

In July, Adlink announced a NEON-2000-JT2 machine vision camera based on an Nvidia Jetson TX2 or Jetson Xavier NX module. Now the company has returned with a similarly Ubuntu-driven NEON-1000-MDX Smart Camera with the same form factor, but powered by an Intel Apollo Lake SoC accompanied by an Intel Movidius Myriad X VPU for AI processing.

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Linux Mint Cinnamon Vs. MATE: which one to choose?

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint is by far one of the most popular Linux distros on the market, especially among Windows users who are jumping into the Linux bandwagon. This is mostly because Linux Mint comes with a familiar desktop environment that resembles the classic Windows desktop. It offers tons of quality of life features, making it very user-friendly for users who have never tried Linux before.

Since Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, you get access to the largest Linux community to help you out with all your problems and issues.

With that being said, when you got to download the Linux Mint ISO, you will be presented with three desktop environments to choose from.

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Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Can You Build a Gaming PC for $500?

    Of course, you don't have to use Windows -- Linux-based operating systems are free and many support a large library of games. Ubuntu is very popular, it's easy to set up, and well supported. Another alternative to consider is Valve's SteamOS. However, unlike Ubuntu, it's not as simple to install and its sole focus is playing games through Steam. It is free, of course, and that alone makes it worth considering.

  • Comedy point and click adventure Plot of the Druid to get a demo in October

    Plot of the Druid is an upcoming fantasy comedy point and click adventure, it's coming with Linux support and they're going to be putting out a demo on October 15.

    "Harness the power of nature to solve problems. Avoid awkward social situations by turning into a small furry creature. Befriend wood spirits that are very reclusive, especially when they have hangovers. Crash a radical party by the Druids Against Nature. Rescue a beautiful princess from a nasty bladder infection. And all while you’re trying to finish school. Which better happen soon, because an insanely dangerous tournament is about to start. No one’s ever won the tournament, but who cares when you’re a powerful druid, right?"

    Looks like it could be another good one, currently in development by Adventure4Life Studios who worked on the fan-made remaster of Indiana Jones and the fate of Atlantis, which ended up being shut down by Lucasfilm. Plot of the Druid uses high-definition hand-painted drawings that capture the feel of old-school pixel art, mixed with plenty of sarcastic humour found in the classics.

  • Faraway: Director's Cut getting a launch delay to be 'bigger and better'

    Faraway: Director's Cut, the upcoming PC release of the very popular mobile game was originally due next week but they're no longer setting a date.

    A promising looking game, with some fun puzzles but it wasn't enough time for Pine Studio. In a fresh announcement on Steam, they mentioned how it's going to be their first self-published game and so they have full control of the release so they 'want to do it right'. As for why such a sudden delay so close to release, this was due to an 'exceptional' closed-beta test with lots of feedback they want to consider.

  • Northgard hits 2 million copies sold, Clan of the Lynx DLC is out now

    After recently announcing an impressive 2 million copies sold milestone, Shiro Games have released the Clan of the Lynx DLC for their strategy game Northgard.

    "Led by Mielikki, the Beastmaster, and her lynx companions, Brundr and Kaelinn, Northgard's newest force excels at hunting more so than open warfare. Prowl through dense forests, stalking animals and mythological creatures, and return victorious with Hunting Trophies to unlock powerful abilities for the fearsome felines."

  • Want to play Soldat 2? We have some copies to give away

    The classic side-scrolling multiplayer action platformer shall return in Soldat 2 on September 22, so we've teamed up with Transhuman Design to offer a few copies to GOL readers.

    Soldat 2 is a 2.5D shooter directly based on the original, with an aim to create a more modern version with lots of enhanced content. This includes customization, modding with Steam Workshop support, randomly generated levels, custom game rules and modes, new weapons, vehicles and so much more. Developed by Michal "MM" Marcinkowski - creator of the original.

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