Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 03 Dec 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

Kernel: LWN Articles (Paywall Expired), Alexander Popov, and Phoronix on Bcachefs and VPU

Filed under
Linux
  • A realtime developer's checklist

    We want all applications to be correct and bug-free, Ogness began; in the realtime domain, correctness "means running at the correct time". The application must wake up within a bounded time limit when there is time-critical work to do. Ogness highlighted that, in realtime systems, the right timing of tasks is a requirement; things will go wrong if the constraints are not met. Developers need to define which tasks and applications are time-critical; he noted that a lot of people mistakenly think that all tasks in a realtime system are realtime, while most of them are not.

    The good news for developers is that, under Linux, they can write realtime applications using only the POSIX API with the realtime extensions. The code will look familiar, and only three additional header files are required: sched.h (a member of the audience noted that the musl C library does not implement this one), time.h, and pthread.h.

    There are three properties that a realtime operating system must have: deterministic scheduling behavior, interruptibility (the CPU is always running something, so there should be a way to interrupt a task), and a way to avoid priority inversion, which happens when a high-priority task must wait for a lower-priority one. The third property, which might be less familiar to non-realtime developers, was described with an example.

  • iproute2 and libbpf: vendoring on the small scale

    LWN's recent article on Kubernetes in Debian discussed the challenges of packaging a massive project with hundreds of dependencies. Many of the issues that arose there, however, are not limited to such projects, as can be seen in the ongoing discussion about whether a copy of the relatively small libbpf library should be shipped with the iproute2 collection of networking tools. Fast-moving projects, it would seem, continue to feel limited by the restrictions imposed by the Linux distribution model.
    Iproute2 is a collection of network-configuration tools found on almost any Linux system; it includes utilities like arpd, ip (the command old-timers guiltily think they should be using when they type ifconfig), ss, and tc. That last command, in particular, is used to configure the traffic-control subsystem, which allows administrators to manage and prioritize the flow of network traffic through their systems. This subsystem has, for some years, had the capability to load and run BPF programs to both classify packets and make decisions on how to queue them. This mechanism gives administrators a great deal of flexibility in the management of network traffic.

    The code for handling BPF programs within iproute2 is old, though, and lacks support for many of the features that have been added to BPF in the last few years. Since that code was written, the BPF community has developed libbpf (which lives in the kernel source tree) as the preferred way to work with BPF programs and load them into the kernel. This is not a small task; libbpf must interpret the instructions encoded as special ELF sections in an executable BPF program and make the necessary calls to the sprawling bpf() system call. This work can include creating maps, "relocating" structure offsets to match the configuration of the running kernel, loading programs, and attaching those programs to the appropriate hooks within the kernel. Libbpf has grown quickly, along with the rest of the BPF ecosystem.

  • Systemd catches up with bind events

    The kernel project has a strong focus on not breaking user-space applications; if something works with a given kernel release, it should continue to work with subsequent releases. So it may be discouraging to read the lengthy exposition on an apparent user-space API break in the announcement for the systemd 247-rc2 release. Changes to udev configuration files will be needed to keep systems working, but the systemd project claims that it "is not [the] fault of systemd or udev, but caused by an incompatible kernel change that happened back in Linux 4.12". It seems like an appropriate time to look at what happened, how administrators need to respond, and whether anything can be done to avoid this kind of thing from happening again.
    Modern computers tend to be highly dynamic, with devices (of both the physical and virtual variety) appearing and disappearing while the system is running. The kernel handles the low-level details with regard to these device events, but it is up to user space to take care of the rest. For that to happen, user space needs to know when something has changed with the system's configuration.

    To that end, events are emitted to user space from deep within the kernel's driver-core subsystem whenever something changes; for example, plugging in a USB device will result in the creation of one or more ADD events to tell user space that the new device is available. The udev daemon is charged with responding to these events according to a set of rules; it can create device nodes, set permissions, notify other user-space components, and more, all in response to properties attached to events by matching rules. The set of possible events is relatively small and does not change often.

  • Changed-block tracking and differential backups in QEMU

    The block layer of QEMU, the open-source machine emulator and virtualizer, forms the backbone of many storage virtualization features: the QEMU Copy-On-Write (QCOW2) disk-image file format, disk image chains, point-in-time snapshots, backups, and more. At the recently concluded 2020 KVM Forum virtual event, Eric Blake gave a talk on the current work in QEMU and libvirt to make differential backups more powerful. As the name implies, "differential backups" address the efficiency problems of full disk backups: space usage and speed of backup creation.

    There's also the similar-sounding term, "incremental backups". The difference is that differential tracks what has changed since any given backup, while incremental tracks changes only since the last backup. Incremental backups are a subset of differential backups, but both are often lumped under the "incremental backups" term. This article will stick to "differential" as the broader term.

    With differential backups, one of the two endpoints when creating backups is always the current point in time. In other words, it is not like Git, where, if the latest version of a file is, say, v4, you can still diff between v2 and v3 — with differential backups, one of the two diff points is always v4, the current point in time.

    QEMU has had block-layer primitives to support full backups for some time; these were most commonly used for live-migrating the entire storage of a virtual machine, or for point-in-time snapshots. But over the past couple of years, QEMU and libvirt have picked up steam toward the goal of making differential backups a first-class feature that is enabled by default.

  • Linux kernel heap quarantine versus use-after-free exploits | Alexander Popov

    It's 2020. Quarantines are everywhere – and here I'm writing about one, too. But this quarantine is of a different kind.

    In this article I'll describe the Linux Kernel Heap Quarantine that I developed for mitigating kernel use-after-free exploitation. I will also summarize the discussion about the prototype of this security feature on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML).

  • Bcachefs Going Through Period Of More Performance Optimizations - Phoronix

    Bcachefs was sent out for another round of review at the end of October. While it doesn't look like this file-system born out of Linux's block cache code will be mainlined in the immediate near future, it's still on a nice trajectory.

    The October post to the Linux kernel mailing list outlined all of the current features and those recently completed like erasure coding, inline data extents, and more -- plus many bug fixes.

  • Intel Begins Upstreaming Work For Their Vision Processing Unit On Linux

    While Intel engineers over the course of the year began upstreaming various elements of the Keem Bay SoC support, the actual Vision Processing Unit (VPU) enabling hasn't been sent out for review until now. Intel has sent out their initial patches for bringing up the Vision Processing Unit on the open-source Linux kernel.

    Intel's Visual Processing Unit that is new to the Keem Bay SoC can be used as a standalone SoC or as a PCI Express vision processing accelerator The Linux kernel work is ultimately about fulfilling both possible uses.

Software: Bolt, GMusicBrowser and Shortwave

Filed under
Software
  • bolt 0.9.1 with fixes for integrated thunderbolt controller

    A new release of bolt is out: 0.9.1 - Unstable icy waters. This is a bug-fix release that addresses some issue on integrated Thunderbolt controller.

    Intel's Ice Lake is the first architecture where the Thunderbolt controller is part of the CPU die. This is quite a big difference. There is a good article on wikichip called "A Look At The Ice Lake Thunderbolt 3 Integration" for those that are curious about the technical details. What matters for bolt is that there is no DROM, which means that the udev device representing the host switch does not have the usual name and id attributes for the device and vendor. Additionally, the unique_id attribute has a different UUID every boot. This breaks one of the fundamental assumptions for boltd, which used the unique_id of the host to uniquely identify the corresponding Thunderbolt domain. This is important because we store host devices and domains in the store. Now, with the uuid changing this means that 1) we can not match the previously stored domains and hosts to the ones after a reboot and thus will accumulate "stale" domains in the store. Ironically, the fact that the host device also does not have any name and id information means that boltd would refuse to create the BoltDevice for those which meant we did at least not accumulate the stale host devices in the store. It did break the detection of the generation, i.e. if it is Thunderbolt 3 or USB 4.

  • GMusicBrowser Back From the Dead with GTK3 Port - OMG! Ubuntu!

    It’s been a long time since I last typed the name ‘Gmusicbrowser’ in a post but what d’ya know: the venerable music player recently issued a pair of new releases.

    Gmusicbrowser was a fairly popular audio app back in the day due to its customisable nature, and its ability to handle large (and I mean large) music collections. The open source app supports all major music files like .mp3, .ogg, and .flac — with the new release .opus joins the club.

    It’s possible to tweak, tune, and tailor the look of Gmusicbrowser in a giddying number of ways using its ‘layouts’ feature. You can craft these by hand, or use a built-in preset (e.g., ‘iTunes’, ‘Rhythmbox’, ‘Quod Libet’, etc).

  • Repo Review: Shortwave

    A few years ago, I had already reviewed quite a few of the internet radio players available in the repository, but I thought I'd take the time now to have a look at a new radio player available called Shortwave. Shortwave uses the very large, community driven radio-browser.info database for its lists of internet radio stations, giving you access to over 28,000 radio streams.

    Shortwave has a nicer and more modern user interface than a lot of the other internet radio players I've previously tested. The simplicity of Shortwave is good, making it quick and easy to find the radio stations that you're looking for. The main screen that you're presented with when opening Shortwave is the Library page. This is where you can keep all your favorite radio stations for easy access. Clicking on the + button at the top left of the window will take you to the Discover page, where you can find new radio stations to listen to.

    [...]

    Shortwave, in my opinion, is one of the best internet radio players that I've used. It may not have quite as many advanced features as some of the other radio players available, but it makes up for that with its great ease of use. And now would also be the perfect time to use Shortwave for listening to some of your favorite Christmas carols!

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Short Topix: 200 Most Common Passwords Of 2020

    Despite the "annual warnings" (which are most likely much, much more frequent), users are still using easy-to-hack, easy-to-crack passwords. I know that, as this magazine's Chief Editor for over 11 years, we have run password articles so many times in the past that it's now impossible to count them all. I know this definitely isn't my first password article of 2020, either.

    Well, NordPass has released its list of the 200 most common passwords, along with their frequency of use, how many users were found using them, the length of time it took to crack the passwords, and how many times it was exposed. Without much surprise, the top "password" used was 123456. It rose to the number one spot, after occupying the number two spot in 2019.

    Now, you've got to promise me that you won't LAUGH at some of these passwords! Below is a reprint of the top 20 worst passwords of 2020.

    [...]

    Specifically, the issue goes something like this. If a Go SMS Pro user sends photos, videos or files to a user who does NOT have the app installed, the files are uploaded to a server, and the non-user of the app was sent a message via SMS text with a link to the files. This way, non-users did not have to install Go SMS Pro just to receive or view the files. At least, that's how it was supposed to work.

    However, researchers discovered that even when files were shared between users who both had the app installed, files were still uploaded to the servers. What's worse, the server was unsecured, and could be accessed by anyone with the link. Researchers also discovered that the web addresses were sequential, which means that anyone who could figure out the predictable web address could potentially gain access to millions of private files.

  • Certificates from Let's Encrypt (R3 active)

    Let's Encrypt has announced that, as of today, the TLS certificates issued by the Let's Encrypt certificate authority are using a new intermediate certificate. "While LE will start using their new _roots_ next year, the change today is using a _variant_ of their "R3" certificate which is cross-signed from IdenTrust, rather than chaining back to their "ISRG Root X1". This will affect you if you're using DANE, TLSA records in DNS, signed by DNSSEC, to advertise properties of the certificate chain which remote systems should expect to see."

  • Josh Bressers: Episode 228 – Door 03: Do all vulnerabilities matter equally?

    Josh and Kurt talk about how many security vulnerabilities matter enough to fix?

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Open Liberty 20.0.0.12 brings support for gRPC, custom JNDI names, and Java SE 15 - Red Hat Developer

    Open Liberty 20.0.0.12 now supports gRPC 1.0 and gRPC Client 1.0. This universal, open source framework is an efficient way to connect remote services across data centers. We’ve also added custom names support for the Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI), making it easier to look up and inject Jakarta Enterprise Beans (EJBs) in your Open Liberty applications. Finally, this new release is compatible with Java SE 15, the latest Java Standard Edition version. We’ll introduce these features and show you how to set up and configure the new gRPC and custom JNDI names support in Open Liberty 20.0.0.12.

  • Pablo Iranzo Gómez: Upstream/Downstream documentation workflow
  • Updates to Container Tools in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3

    The launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.3, brings with it a host of new container capabilities. This builds on the work done in RHEL 8.2 (New container capabilities in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2) and gives users even more reasons to upgrade from RHEL 7.

  • The rise of the Robot Operating System

    Having your work covered in a documentary like How to Start a Robot Revolution — a five-part documentary in the Open Source Stories series from Red Hat — is bound to make you feel old. You look back and think, "wow, I've been doing this for a long time." Indeed some of us have been working on Robot Operating System (ROS) now for well over a decade, far exceeding the traditional Silicon Valley two-year cycle of jumping to the next thing.

    Personally, the story in the film is just the latest chapter in an even longer journey. As a computer engineering undergrad at Tulane University in the mid-1990s, I met a new professor in the department named Jim Jennings. Like the other faculty, Jennings had a lab, but unlike them, his lab had robots. There were three RWI B14 robots, and students were welcome to program them. I was immediately hooked by the experience of writing code that made things move in the world.

  • Kafka Monthly Digest – November 2020

    In this 34th edition of the Kafka Monthly Digest, I’ll cover what happened in the Apache Kafka community in November 2020.

  • New IBM Redpaper: SUSE and IBM Power Systems for SAP HANA

What Is the Best Linux Distro for Laptops?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Let's start with those aging, venerable machines: your old laptop. Linux carries a strong reputation for breathing life into old hardware, and Lubuntu is one of the best options.

Lubuntu, as you might guess from the name, is an Ubuntu derivative. It uses a different desktop environment from Ubuntu, opting for the more lightweight and less resource-intensive LXDE desktop instead of GNOME. The result is a lightweight Linux distro that will run nicely on an older laptop.

Lubuntu requires a minimum of 1GB RAM for "advanced internet services" such as YouTube and Facebook, while just 512MB RAM will suffice for basic operations such as LibreOffice and basic web browsing. In terms of CPU, you'll need at least an Intel Pentium 4 or Pentium M, or an AMD K8.

Read more

Don't Panic: Kubernetes and Docker

Filed under
Server

Docker as an underlying runtime is being deprecated in favor of runtimes that use the Container Runtime Interface(CRI) created for Kubernetes. Docker-produced images will continue to work in your cluster with all runtimes, as they always have.

If you’re an end-user of Kubernetes, not a whole lot will be changing for you. This doesn’t mean the death of Docker, and it doesn’t mean you can’t, or shouldn’t, use Docker as a development tool anymore. Docker is still a useful tool for building containers, and the images that result from running docker build can still run in your Kubernetes cluster.

If you’re using a managed Kubernetes service like GKE or EKS, you will need to make sure your worker nodes are using a supported container runtime before Docker support is removed in a future version of Kubernetes. If you have node customizations you may need to update them based on your environment and runtime requirements. Please work with your service provider to ensure proper upgrade testing and planning.

If you’re rolling your own clusters, you will also need to make changes to avoid your clusters breaking. At v1.20, you will get a deprecation warning for Docker. When Docker runtime support is removed in a future release (currently planned for the 1.23 release in late 2021) of Kubernetes it will no longer be supported and you will need to switch to one of the other compliant container runtimes, like containerd or CRI-O. Just make sure that the runtime you choose supports the docker daemon configurations you currently use (e.g. logging).

Read more

International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is almost here: Stand with us on Dec. 4

Filed under
GNU

Although many of us are in quarantine, that doesn't mean that we have to cease our fight against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). The International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is just two days away, and we're here to let you know how we can all stand up this Friday, December 4th, against the latest encroachments from one of DRM's major players: Netflix.

As pandemic response measures all over the world forced so many people to stay home, we've seen a corresponding and dangerous increase in dependence on streaming media for entertainment. Streaming media has gone from an ethically problematic pastime to being a playground for dystopia. In a world where media is served over ephemeral streaming, these services can delete things from history, or rewrite them, sometimes without any announcement. Besides deciding what people can and can't view with their service, corporations like Netflix also dictate what can and can't be made, now that they're one of the heavyweights in television and film production and distribution. This rise in control is in part due to their constant mistreatment of their subscribers, having used DRM to prevent legitimate uses of their media and dictate which devices can play it.

December 4th marks the start of Netflix's "StreamFest" initiative in certain countries -- letting users have a taste of the poison apple before they commit to taking the bite. It's at times like these that we as a community need to step up and say that enough is enough, and let them know that DRM is unacceptable no matter where it appears or how it's being used. We may not be meeting in person, but that doesn't mean we can't come together and let our voices be heard. We hope you'll join us in this year's IDAD by following one or more of the suggestions we've provided below.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: BSPWM, Coder Radio, Destination Linux, Microsoft Entryism and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install ELK on Ubuntu 20.04

    The ELK stack is known as Elastic Stack is a collection of three open-source software i.e. Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. The ELK stack is used to search, analyze, and visualize a large volume of data.

  • How-To: Upgrade PinePhone PCB - Boiling Steam

    BraveHeart and UBPorts PinePhone owners: know that you’re not left in the dark if you wanted to have 3 GB of RAM and double the internal storage (32 GB) on your existing device, without having to buy another PinePhone.

    Pine64 has made it possible to upgrade your existing device by selling the mainboard itself. This component currently costs $105; they used to sell them at a discount of $80 for people who already had the older-generation PinePhones, but it seems that promotion has already ended. Tack on another $12 or so for standard shipping, and $20 for expediated shipping.

    I’ve noticed during the time I’ve used Arch Linux with this upgrade, the extra GB of RAM has definitely made an improvement in terms of responsive-ness. Menus and applications open and close a lot more smoothly. And you can’t go wrong with having double the storage capacity; now you can install more applications, have more music, etc.

  • Apt vs. Aptitude Command: A Definitive Guide | FOSS Linux

    f you are like me, you surely have come across the aptitude and apt command. Not only that, but you should have also seen discussions based on which one is “better”? If you are still wondering, then you have come to the right place as we not only understand both of them but also try to differentiate them in the most unbiased way you can find.

  • [Old] How to enable SSH login notifications by email in CentOS 8

    Is your Linux Server used by multiple users and you want to know when a user is logging in by SSH? If yes, then you can enable SSH notifications in Bash profile to get notified. We will add a small script that will send you an email when somebody logs into the server.

  • MAAS CLI-only machine creation | Ubuntu

    The whole point of MAAS configuration is to get machines deployed. If you read the previous post in this series, you know how to install MAAS and do basic configuration using only the MAAS Command-Line Interface (CLI). So far, so good, but now we need to enable networking and create some machines.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-15 Arrives on December 16th with More Improvements for the Volla Phone

Filed under
Ubuntu

Not even a month after they released Ubuntu Touch OTA-14, the UBports Foundation is already working on Ubuntu Touch OTA-15, which is now available for public testing.

This release promises more improvements for the Volla Phone and other Android 9 devices. For example, it fixes buggy audio playback on the Volla Phone, as well as other devices, sending of USSD codes on all Android 9 devices, and Volla Phone’s front camera orientation to correctly rotate the photos after being taken.

Read more

PCLinuxOS Selected Articles/New Pages

Filed under
PCLOS
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: The Cat

    Why and when did you start using Linux?
    Just one year after our family bought our first PC with Win95, it already started freezing, breaking. All the wonders from MS. Since then, I started looking for an alternative to that crap. I heard about Linux, but back in the 90's there were very few people, books and resources about it in Brazil. So, after a frustrating period with a Mac (which let me down when it simply stopped functioning), I found Linux in Switzerland. My first distro was Linux Mint, which was quite friendly to use, but that broke my computer after every biannual big update, and the users' forum was useless. So, after learning about the evil systemd, I read something about the Resistance, the Few Ones who kept the flame of tradition! And here am I with PCLinuxOS, since the glorious year of 2014!

    What specific equipment do you currently use with PCLinuxOS?
    Two notebooks, one is a Lenovo with Intel i5, the other one is an old (and brave) single core Toshiba Satellite!

    Do you feel that your use of Linux influences the reactions you receive from your computer peers or family? If so, how?
    People still believe that Linux is for engineers, geeks and the like, so some think you're some kind of hacker, or genius. When you show them the graphical desktop, with all looking "normal", with icons, and Firefox and all the like, they get amazed!

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • Good Words, Good Deeds, Good News
  • Welcome From The Chief Editor

    Here's To Hoping that 2021 is far, far better than the 2020 that we all have endured. It's going to take some time to see how much impact the COVID-19 pandemic will have on society and many entrenched habits/trends that have existed for many, many years. But, any time something of this magnitude hits society, there's almost no way it can't have an impact. We'll never be able to go back to the old "normal." That old "normal" will be replaced with a new "normal" that will supplant it in ways we cannot yet begin to imagine.

  • Mind Your Step: Going On Sabbatical

    If you have watched videos about Linux on YouTube, especially ones that compare various distributions, did you notice that most of those videos do not even mention PCLinuxOS.

    It does not do us well when it comes to public exposure of the distribution. But in this case, it is a good thing. Sometimes, not being popular has its benefits.

    What I am saying is that the less popular a technology or product is, the less likely cybercriminals will spend time trying whatever it is they do on these products.

    [...]

    I am considering installing Nextcloud on my webspace after moving the original website to Neocities. So far, It seems to work, but with a few quirks.

    The webspace assigned contains 100GB of storage and runs in a container configured with 512MB of RAM, and enough bandwidth for a low traffic website, which this website has been for the past 24 years!

    I have not decided whether to go for it or not, being that this is a low traffic website, and that Nextcloud was designed for high traffic servers. What attracts me to this solution is the high level of security built into the application.

    The fact that this website existed for 24 years without a data breach or other attack is proof that the less popular a technology, product or idea is, the less it becomes vulnerable (or even feasible) to cyberattacks.

    Case in point, the Slackware website is still accessed through HTTP instead of HTTPS, due to the fact that almost no one new to Linux has even heard of Slackware, let alone trying to install that distribution on their machines. At least my website is accessed only through HTTPS, which is important as I do not want my website to be tagged as Not Secure by Google simply because I did not enable HTTPS for my website.

    Another solution I am considering is to use a product such as WordPress, but not allowing any accounts to be created. (The main website for PCLinuxOS does just that!)

    I know that I just mentioned that WordPress is a popular product for building websites. But the way it is used on the main PCLinuxOS website is an exception to that theory.

The Spectre Mitigation Performance Impact On AMD Ryzen 5000 "Zen 3" Processors

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering what the current cost is to the default Spectre mitigation protections on the new AMD Ryzen 5000 series "Zen 3" processors, here are a set of performance tests looking at that overhead with the still relevant mitigations applied by default and then if forcing them off. The Zen 3 mitigation overhead was compared then to similar AMD Zen 2 and Zen+ processors.

After looking last week at the odd state of mitigation performance on Intel's new Tiger Lake processors, the attention shifted to looking at the mitigation overhead for the new AMD Zen 3 processors. Thankfully there is less mitigations to worry about with AMD processors but still even with these new processors there is still a measurable difference in affected workloads between mitigations on and off. Also, unlike Tiger Lake and contrary to rumors, the Zen 3 mitigation performance was in the right direction: disabling the mitigations did help boost the performance as is logical, unlike what we saw with Tiger Lake where now disabling the mitigations hurt the overall performance.

Read more

Open source predictions for 2021

Filed under
OSS

When I think of open source and 2021, a Saga song comes to mind: "On The Loose." I believe no one can stop open source in the coming year--that's how big it's going to get. That's saying something, given how enterprise businesses already depend on open source technology on a daily basis. The dependency we're currently experiencing is nothing compared to what I predict for the coming year.

Of course, it's not just about business, as I have one rather bold prediction for consumers as well.

What are these predictions? Let me warm up my crystal ball, dim the lights, drop the needle on some music to create the perfect ambiance, and gaze deep into the waters of the future.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install Wiki.js on CentOS 8 - RoseHosting

    Wiki.js is a free and open-source wiki application written in Node.js. It is simple, lightweight, and uses Markdown files to saves all contents. You can save your content directly to the Markdown file and sync it with your Git repository. It offers a rich set of features including, integrated access control, a built-in search engine, and supports external authentication.

  • How to install FreeCAD on Linux Mint 20 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install FreeCAD on Linux Mint 20.

  • How to optimize the apt package manager on Debian-based Linux distributions - TechRepublic

    There are a number of ways Linux is superior to other operating systems. Not only is Linux more reliable and stable, it’s more secure and user-friendly (in more areas than you might believe). But above everything else, one of the most amazing things about Linux is it’s flexibility. You’d be hard-pressed to find a distribution of Linux that insists you do it one way and only one way (which is the case with Windows and macOS).

  • Image Noise Reduction By Image Stacking/Blending

    Simply put, it is a way to use multiple photos of an image to reduce the noise in the final image to produce a cleaner and clearer final image.

    Image Stacking/Blending is not the same as Focus Stacking, which is normally used when taking Macro or Close Up images.

  • Faked Memory Sticks

    There is a big trade in cheaper memory sticks, that is, all types. These include both USB Pen Drives and SDXC and microSDXC (aka TF) types. But there are many others. Some cheaper ones have speed problems, and if that's not a concern, go ahead. But amongst them are a number of Fake Memory drives. Let's just explain what that means.

    A fake memory drive is a memory drive, it's the details that are faked. It will actually work up to a point. What has been faked is the amount of storage space it holds. Your computer or phone or whatever device using it, relies on information stored at the beginning of the memory to know how much space there is on it. Also held there is the file index system. If someone can overwrite that information, then the drive can return false data to the system about how much space it has.

  • Inkscape Tutorial: Create A Custom Calendar
  • Using Timeshift To Backup & Restore Your PCLinuxOS System

    I recently ran across a post by one of the PCLinuxOS forum members, asking for an article/tutorial on how to use Timeshift, so I decided to give it a go.

    Now, if you're new to PCLinuxOS or Linux in general, you may be asking yourself, "what is Timeshift?"

    Well, Timeshift is a package/program written for Linux to create restore points for your operating system, much like the restore point feature in Windows. It allows you to make incremental backups that create exact images of your system, at specific points in time. They can be used to restore your system to the exact state that it was in, at the time when the backup was made. The backups are incremental so they don't need as much hard drive space to store.

  • BPF For Observability: Getting Started Quickly | Linux Journal

    BPF is a powerful component in the Linux kernel and the tools that make use of it are vastly varied and numerous. In this article we examine the general usefulness of BPF and guide you on a path towards taking advantage of BPF’s utility and power. One aspect of BPF, like many technologies, is that at first blush it can appear overwhelming. We seek to remove that feeling and to get you started.

  • Learn how to simplify data protection using Vinchin Backup & Recovery with Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager

    Looking for a reliable backup solution for your Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager deployments?

    Join us on Wednesday, December 16, for a webinar with Luwen Zhang from Vinchin and Simon Coter from Oracle. Luwen and Simon will discuss how to simplify the data protection process using Vinchin Backup & Recovery with Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager.

Linux: The 7 best distributions for new users

Filed under
Linux

The age-old question has returned, one that divides a certain community faster than a penguin can devour a mouthful of krill. That question? What are the best Linux distributions for new users? When you ask the question of the Linux community, they inevitably answer with the distribution they use. Why wouldn't they? Loyalty has always been set at a fairly high bar with Linux. You find a distribution that's perfect for you, and you want everyone to use it. Thing is, you probably forget that your Linux skills are likely considerably higher than the average user--and especially the new user.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GhostBSD 20.11.28 overview | A simple, elegant desktop BSD Operating System. - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of GhostBSD 20.11.28 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • mintCast 349 – NAT Ain’t A Firewall – mintCast

    First up, in our Wanderings, Leo has another helping of Pi, Moss gets spooked, Josh changes up the desktop, and Joe strips.

    Then in the news, OpenSUSE’s going public?, Pine64 feels the Plasma, and Linux gets Ray tracing.

    In security, kill switches and a reminder that NAT ain’t a firewall.

  • The Month in WordPress: November 2020

    November 2020 saw several updates to the WordPress 5.6 release. Read on to follow all the latest news from the WordPress world!

  • Taskcluster's DB (Part 3) - Online Migrations

    A few of the tables holding data for Taskcluster contain a tens or hundreds of millions of lines. That’s not what the cool kids mean when they say “Big Data”, but it’s big enough that migrations take a long time. Most changes to Postgres tables take a full lock on that table, preventing other operations from occurring while the change takes place. The duration of the operation depends on lots of factors, not just of the data already in the table, but on the kind of other operations going on at the same time.

    The usual approach is to schedule a system downtime to perform time-consuming database migrations, and that’s just what we did in July. By running it a clone of the production database, we determined that we could perform the migration completely in six hours. It turned out to take a lot longer than that. Partly, this was because we missed some things when we shut the system down, and left some concurrent operations running on the database. But by the time we realized that things were moving too slowly, we were near the end of our migration window and had to roll back. The time-consuming migration was version 20 - migrate queue_tasks, and it had been estimated to take about 4.5 hours.

    When we rolled back, the DB was at version 19, but the code running the Taskcluster services corresponded to version 12. Happily, we had planned for this situation, and the redefined stored functions described in part 2 bridged the gap with no issues.

  •   

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (brotli, jupyter-notebook, and postgresql-9.6), Fedora (perl-Convert-ASN1 and php-pear), openSUSE (go1.15, libqt5-qtbase, mutt, python-setuptools, and xorg-x11-server), Oracle (firefox, kernel, libvirt, and thunderbird), Red Hat (rh-postgresql10-postgresql and rh-postgresql12-postgresql), SUSE (java-1_8_0-openjdk, python, python-cryptography, python-setuptools, python3, and xorg-x11-server), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-aws, linux-aws-5.4, linux-azure, linux-azure-5.4, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-5.4, linux-hwe-5.4, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-oracle-5.4, linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi, linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-kvm, linux-lts-trusty, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, python-werkzeug, and xorg-server, xorg-server-hwe-16.04, xorg-server-hwe-18.04).

Server: BSD, OpenStack, and GNU/Linux

Filed under
Server
  • From Unix to Linux: Key Trends in the Evolution of Operating Systems (Part 2)

    According to the McKusick article cited earlier, BSD's popularity seems to stem from the cost-free distribution of the system, more than from any technical superiority over Bell Labs’ Unix. As I mentioned, AT&T had no scruples about folding BSD innovations back into Unix. The C code in BSD now looks dated and sometimes a bit scary, but the tools and operating system were production-ready and popular.

    When Digital Equipment Corporation brought out their VAX minicomputers as a replacement for the PDP series, the Berkeley crew grabbed the VAX Unix port from AT&T and built a new version of BSD on it. Mini-computers became a central part of the computing landscape in the late 1970s and early 1980s (before personal computers became commercially available), and BSD's popularity grew along with the VAX. A popular warning was, "All the world is not a VAX." This referred to bad habits that computer science students were picking up because the VAX helpfully did things such as provide them with zeroed-out memory if they failed to initialize the memory explicitly. If programmers relied on finding zeros in uninitialized memory, their programs would go horribly wrong when ported to other systems. This was now a world where programmers expected to move between computer systems, and take their programs with them. That world was created by Unix and BSD.

    BSD was also the impetus for the great eruption that brought Unix into the commercial mainstream: the founding of Sun Microsystems. Bill Joy and his colleagues took advantage of the permissive BSD license to sell computers with their enhanced version of BSD, called SunOS. Sun Microsystems’ workstations and mini-computer servers wiped out a generation of other mini-computer companies and started to set the standard for modern computing and networking—all based on SunOS, which meant BSD.

  • Most Reliable Hosting Company Sites in November 2020

    The most reliable hosting company site in November 2020 was New York Internet (NYI), which responded to all of Netcraft’s requests in November. NYI offers a comprehensive set of hybrid IT solutions across cloud, multi-cloud, colocation and bare metal in its US data centres. So far in 2020, NYI has appeared seven times in the top 10.

    In November, the top eight sites each responded to all of Netcraft’s requests and were separated by average connection time. Webair appeared in second place. The hosting provider has provided managed hosting solutions for over 18 years and offers colocation across North America, Europe and Singapore.

    Hyve Managed Hosting wraps up the podium places, in third. Hyve provides a range of services including cloud hosting for business with full management services. These services are complemented by 35 data centres across Europe, North and South America, Asia and Australia.

    Whilst Linux continues to dominate the top 10, FreeBSD makes an appearance in first place in November with NYI.

  • Forecasting the future of cloud with OpenStack experts | Ubuntu

    OpenStack, the cloud computing platform, has proved to be a beacon of success for open source. It rounds off 10 years in existence this year, a period which has seen it reach nearly 200 countries, and we want to look ahead to what the future holds for the technology. We’ve spoken to a number of journalists and other leading experts, including the Open Infrastructure Foundation, the organisation which manages the development of the technology, to understand how OpenStack may develop in the future.

    While we’ve seen businesses of all sizes adopt OpenStack to embrace the cutting edge and engage with the likes of AI and containers, predicting its next steps is not such an easy question to answer. John Leonard, Research Editor from the UK’s Computing, explains: “That’s a little hard to say. Open source is now the default rather than the exception and there are many more open source collaborations now covering different areas, notably the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). I expect OpenStack will end up focusing on areas of IaaS less well served by Kubernetes, perhaps around serverless and storage innovations.”

    [...]

    Tytus Kurek, Product Manager at Canonical believes the foundational element of OpenStack will prove important; “Whereas the interest has long spread to other technologies, OpenStack remains the foundation of private cloud infrastructure across many organisations. In the following years we’re expecting to see continuous improvements around its stability, security and integration as well as supportability for 5G, AI/ML, edge and even more advanced use cases.”

    What’s vital though, is no matter how they grow over the coming years, OpenStack and its contemporaries remain true to the foundations and virtues of open source – ensuring that as many people can contribute and benefit.

  • Moving to a More “Open” Environment

    The expansion and proliferation of open source organizations such as the Linux Foundation and the OpenStack Foundation attest to how much open source projects have become mainstream.

  • Benefits of Hosting on A Linux Server [Ed: Is this a real article? No. It's borderline SEO spam, as the first link in it reveals.]

    One major benefit of Linux is that it doesn’t slow down over time as compared to Windows. As more and more programs and background processes are added the operating system gets addled with a lot of requests.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Santa is pseudo packaging | Playing Perl 6␛b6xA Raku

    Santa needs to know where all the chimneys are. Thanks to schedule constraints, a single subroutine call has to do to query multies defined in a bunch of modules.

  • Development community that we can see to development of Perl Part1 - C language specification creating group | Yuki Kimoto Perl Blog

    The Perl core team seems to be looking for resources to help in language development.

    Currently, it seems the material in python.

    perlgov: the perl governance document

    I feel that Perl and Python cultures are quite different.

    It's also based on an improvised document in 2019 when the Python reader quit.

    I can understand how envious we are when we see Python attracting users(although
    I'm watching a lot of cheating at the same time).

    On the other hand Perl has long been a conservative culture.

    So, we can refer to the methods used by developers of languages, operating systems and tools that also have a conservative mindset.

    The first thing I would like us to refer to is the method used by the group that creates C language specifications.

  • Everything You Need to Know About Bash For Loops in Linux

    A bash script is simply a plain text file containing a series of commands that the bash shell can read and execute. Bash is the default shell in pre-Catalina macOS, and most Linux distributions.

    If you’ve never worked with a shell script before, you should begin with the absolute simplest case. This will allow you to practice key concepts including the creation of the script and its execution.

  • Re-format blah,YYYYMMDD,blah as blah,YYYY,MM,DD,blah

    This exercise was inspired by a recent article by Girish Managoli. He showed how to prepare a data table for machine learning using simple shell tools.

  • The 20 Best Matlab Books For Beginner and Expert Developers [Ed: Better to use GNU Octave, which is Free software and similar]

    MATLAB is short for Matrix Laboratory. MATLAB is the simplest and most profitable computing climate for researchers, scientists, and engineers. It incorporates the MATLAB language, the main programming language devoted to numerical and specialized computing. You can utilize MATLAB for a scope of utilizations, including Artificial Intelligence, signal preparing and interchanges, picture and video handling, deep learning, control frameworks, test and estimation, and computational science. Thus, in this modern era, it has become very crucial to learn MatLab, and for the appropriate guidance, an adequate set of MatLab books is inevitably important.

  • Why I love Emacs

    I'm a habitual Emacs user. I didn't choose Emacs as much as it chose me. Back when I was first learning about Unix, I stumbled upon a little-known feature in a strange application called Emacs, which was apparently hidden away on my computer. Legend had it (and was proven true) that if you typed emacs into a terminal, pressed Alt+X, and typed tetris, you could play a falling-blocks game.

    [...]

    That was my introduction to GNU Emacs. While it was frivolous, it was also an accurate indication of what Emacs is all about—the idea that users can reprogram their (virtual) worlds and do whatever they want with an application. Playing Tetris in your text editor is probably not your primary goal on an everyday basis, but it goes to show that Emacs is, proudly, a programming platform. In fact, you might think of it as a kind of precursor to Jupyter, combining a powerful programming language (called elisp, to be exact) with its own live environment. As a consequence, Emacs is flexible as a text editor, customizable, and powerful.

    Elisp (and Common Lisp, by extension) aren't necessarily the easiest languages to start out on, if you're used to Bash or Python or similar languages. But LISP dialects are powerful, and because Emacs is a LISP interpreter, you can build applications, whether they're Emacs plugins or prototypes of something you want to develop into a stand-alone project. The wildly popular org-mode project is just one example: it's an Emacs plugin as well as a markdown syntax with mobile apps to interpret and extend its capabilities. There are many examples of similarly useful applications-within-Emacs, including an email client, a PDF viewer, web browser, a shell, and a file manager.

X Still Improving and Microsoft 'Embraces' and 'Extends' Mesa, More DRM

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • X.Org Server 1.20.10 Allows For Larger Number Of Input Devices, Present Extension Fixes - Phoronix

    Following Tuesday's disclosure of more X.Org Server security bugs, X.Org Server 1.20.10 was released that provides those input fixes plus a number of other patches that have been back-ported and accumulated in the 1.20 series.

  • Microsoft Begins Landing Changes For Cross-Platform Support With Their Mesa D3D12 Code [Ed: Microsoft is interfering in Mesa development to make it more Windows- and Microsoft-leaning. See the comments: “Did they also include an option to uninstall the windows subsystem?” [...] “Is this worth celebrating? It means nothing for desktop Linux at all." […] "MS is firmly in the “Extend” phase of their conquest…”]

    Last month the Microsoft-backed Direct3D 12 Gallium3D driver was merged into Mesa 21.0. This is the driver for allowing graphics/compute APIs like OpenGL and OpenCL to run on top of Direct3D with Windows 10. That work to the Gallium D3D12 code has been continuing with the start of the cross-platform code now being merged.

  • Syscall User Dispatch Appears Destined For Linux 5.11 To Help Windows Games On Linux

    The Syscall User Dispatch support looks like it should be mainlined for the Linux 5.11 kernel. This functionality is important for modern Windows games running on Linux under Wine / Proton.

    Syscall User Dispatch has been in the works for a while as a kernel-level improvement for dealing with Windows games/apps that use system call instructions, bypassing the Windows API. Games avoiding the Windows API and performing system calls directly is an increasingly common occurrence by modern Windows games, seemingly in the name of Digital Rights Management schemes and similar protected modes. This though has been a problem for Wine (and Steam Play's Proton) when bypassing the conventional Windows APIs.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Open Liberty 20.0.0.12 brings support for gRPC, custom JNDI names, and Java SE 15 - Red Hat Developer

    Open Liberty 20.0.0.12 now supports gRPC 1.0 and gRPC Client 1.0. This universal, open source framework is an efficient way to connect remote services across data centers. We’ve also added custom names support for the Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI), making it easier to look up and inject Jakarta Enterprise Beans (EJBs) in your Open Liberty applications. Finally, this new release is compatible with Java SE 15, the latest Java Standard Edition version. We’ll introduce these features and show you how to set up and configure the new gRPC and custom JNDI names support in Open Liberty 20.0.0.12.

  • Pablo Iranzo Gómez: Upstream/Downstream documentation workflow
  • Updates to Container Tools in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3

    The launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.3, brings with it a host of new container capabilities. This builds on the work done in RHEL 8.2 (New container capabilities in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2) and gives users even more reasons to upgrade from RHEL 7.

  • The rise of the Robot Operating System

    Having your work covered in a documentary like How to Start a Robot Revolution — a five-part documentary in the Open Source Stories series from Red Hat — is bound to make you feel old. You look back and think, "wow, I've been doing this for a long time." Indeed some of us have been working on Robot Operating System (ROS) now for well over a decade, far exceeding the traditional Silicon Valley two-year cycle of jumping to the next thing. Personally, the story in the film is just the latest chapter in an even longer journey. As a computer engineering undergrad at Tulane University in the mid-1990s, I met a new professor in the department named Jim Jennings. Like the other faculty, Jennings had a lab, but unlike them, his lab had robots. There were three RWI B14 robots, and students were welcome to program them. I was immediately hooked by the experience of writing code that made things move in the world.

  • Kafka Monthly Digest – November 2020

    In this 34th edition of the Kafka Monthly Digest, I’ll cover what happened in the Apache Kafka community in November 2020.

  • New IBM Redpaper: SUSE and IBM Power Systems for SAP HANA

What Is the Best Linux Distro for Laptops?

Let's start with those aging, venerable machines: your old laptop. Linux carries a strong reputation for breathing life into old hardware, and Lubuntu is one of the best options. Lubuntu, as you might guess from the name, is an Ubuntu derivative. It uses a different desktop environment from Ubuntu, opting for the more lightweight and less resource-intensive LXDE desktop instead of GNOME. The result is a lightweight Linux distro that will run nicely on an older laptop. Lubuntu requires a minimum of 1GB RAM for "advanced internet services" such as YouTube and Facebook, while just 512MB RAM will suffice for basic operations such as LibreOffice and basic web browsing. In terms of CPU, you'll need at least an Intel Pentium 4 or Pentium M, or an AMD K8. Read more

Don't Panic: Kubernetes and Docker

Docker as an underlying runtime is being deprecated in favor of runtimes that use the Container Runtime Interface(CRI) created for Kubernetes. Docker-produced images will continue to work in your cluster with all runtimes, as they always have. If you’re an end-user of Kubernetes, not a whole lot will be changing for you. This doesn’t mean the death of Docker, and it doesn’t mean you can’t, or shouldn’t, use Docker as a development tool anymore. Docker is still a useful tool for building containers, and the images that result from running docker build can still run in your Kubernetes cluster. If you’re using a managed Kubernetes service like GKE or EKS, you will need to make sure your worker nodes are using a supported container runtime before Docker support is removed in a future version of Kubernetes. If you have node customizations you may need to update them based on your environment and runtime requirements. Please work with your service provider to ensure proper upgrade testing and planning. If you’re rolling your own clusters, you will also need to make changes to avoid your clusters breaking. At v1.20, you will get a deprecation warning for Docker. When Docker runtime support is removed in a future release (currently planned for the 1.23 release in late 2021) of Kubernetes it will no longer be supported and you will need to switch to one of the other compliant container runtimes, like containerd or CRI-O. Just make sure that the runtime you choose supports the docker daemon configurations you currently use (e.g. logging). Read more

International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is almost here: Stand with us on Dec. 4

Although many of us are in quarantine, that doesn't mean that we have to cease our fight against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). The International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is just two days away, and we're here to let you know how we can all stand up this Friday, December 4th, against the latest encroachments from one of DRM's major players: Netflix. As pandemic response measures all over the world forced so many people to stay home, we've seen a corresponding and dangerous increase in dependence on streaming media for entertainment. Streaming media has gone from an ethically problematic pastime to being a playground for dystopia. In a world where media is served over ephemeral streaming, these services can delete things from history, or rewrite them, sometimes without any announcement. Besides deciding what people can and can't view with their service, corporations like Netflix also dictate what can and can't be made, now that they're one of the heavyweights in television and film production and distribution. This rise in control is in part due to their constant mistreatment of their subscribers, having used DRM to prevent legitimate uses of their media and dictate which devices can play it. December 4th marks the start of Netflix's "StreamFest" initiative in certain countries -- letting users have a taste of the poison apple before they commit to taking the bite. It's at times like these that we as a community need to step up and say that enough is enough, and let them know that DRM is unacceptable no matter where it appears or how it's being used. We may not be meeting in person, but that doesn't mean we can't come together and let our voices be heard. We hope you'll join us in this year's IDAD by following one or more of the suggestions we've provided below. Read more