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Friday, 22 Nov 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
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RADV's ACO Back-End Is Helping Radeon Navi Linux Gaming Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Gaming

It's been almost two months since last looking at the RADV ACO performance for this shader compiler back-end alternative to the AMDGPU LLVM code. ACO is making its debut in the upcoming Mesa 19.3 release while since the last round of testing have been more optimizations and fixes as well as getting the Navi/GFX10 support in place. In this article are some fresh benchmarks of the Vulkan RADV ACO support for not only Polaris and Vega but also the Radeon RX 5700 Navi graphics cards.

With a Radeon RX 590, RX 5700, RX 5700 XT, and VII graphics cards I tested Mesa 20.0-devel Git as of this week paired with Linux 5.4 Git -- the Linux 5.4 kernel upgrade also helps gaming performance. This is our first look at the ACO performance for new Navi graphics processors plus a fresh look in general with the ever-evolving state of Mesa Git. There are also new game tests included, namely the recently ported Shadow of the Tomb Raider by Feral Interactive for seeing how that benefits from the ACO back-end.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E33 – The Sentinel

    This week we’ve been to the Linux Application Summit in Barcelona. We round up news from the Ubuntu and desktop Linux community and bring you our picks from the wider tech news.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 33 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Kubernetes and the misconception of multi-cloud portability
  • Linux 5.5 To Finally Expose NVMe Drive Temperatures Via HWMON

    Linux for years has supported monitoring NVMe drive temperatures when installing the nvme user-space utility and run as root, etc. But now finally with Linux 5.5 the kernel is supporting NVMe drive temperature reporting through the hardware monitoring "HWMON" infrastructure alongside other hardware sensors.

    Come the Linux 5.5 stable release in early 2020 is the NVMe HWMON support to allow reporting the current NVMe drive temperature sensor(s) and min/max thresholds via this kernel infrastructure. This in turn allows user-space to simply query the data over sysfs without the need for any utilities, no root requirement, and should gracefully work with the various programs that report HWMON sensor readings to Linux desktop users.

  • PHP 5.3 To PHP 7.4 Performance Benchmarks On AMD EPYC

    With the big PHP 7.4.0 release due out next week, yesterday we published our PHP 7.4.0 benchmarks using the near-final build for this annual update to PHP. Those benchmarks compared previous releases as far back as PHP 5.6. But out of curiosity after that article I went to do some benchmarks going back to PHP 5.3 through PHP 7.4 and PHP 8.0-dev.

    With the AMD EPYC 7642 server running Ubuntu 19.10 used in yesterday's article, I ran the final PHP 5.3/5.4/5.5 benchmarks added in to yesterday's data. So for those curious how the historical PHP5 performance compares to the imminent PHP 7.4, these benchmarks are for your enjoyment today.

  • Wine Patches Coming To Allow UMIP Emulation - Works Around Issues For Ryzen 3000

    Coming up this weekend with the Linux 5.4 kernel is emulation/spoofing of the SGDT/SIDT/SMSW instructions around UMIP for allowing newer 64-bit Windows games to run on Wine and Steam Play (Proton). With newer CPUs like the AMD Ryzen 3000 series that support UMIP, these instructions are not allowed to run in user-space with Wine due to UMIP. So while the first stable kernel release is about to land with this support, some Wine-based emulation not contingent on the kernel patches is also in the works.

  • The different way to check whether you are using a 32-bit or 64-bit version of Linux on your computer
  • KF6 Sprint - Day One

    Today we started our KF6 sprint at the MBition office in Berlin.

    Beside the people attending in person, we have David Faure joining us via web conference.

    Thanks already to the people at MBition that spend time on making it possible to host the sprint there.

    First stuff to be discussed were some high level things, like does the monthly release scheme work out well. Short answer: yes Smile The short period works well, allows people to fix issues directly in frameworks and still have that reasonable fast provided to the users. And the overhead of release creation is low, thanks to automation.

  • Zidoo M9 is a Rockchip RK3399 TV Box/Mini PC/SBC with Dual OS Support

    Zidoo has launched several TV boxes running Android over the years, some of which we reviewed such as Zidoo X9 (2015), or Zidoo H6 Pro.

  • Goldman Sachs is planning on giving some of its most valuable software to Wall Street for free

    Goldman Sachs wants to give away some of its most valuable software.

    The investment bank spent countless hours over 14 years developing a platform called Alloy to help it access and analyze the growing set of financial databases being created across the firm. Now Goldman is taking the unusual step of making that program, as well as the language underlying it, available to the rest of Wall Street for free as open-source software in collaboration with a nonprofit called Finos.

    The software and language "have grown to become critical tools within our firm across the trade lifecycle that help us price, assess and evaluate risk, clear transactions, and perform regulatory reporting," said Neema Raphael, co-chief data officer at Goldman. By making it publicly available, "we'll unlock tremendous value for the industry when we co-develop and share models."

  • Open source transparency comes to root of trust hardware

    Geopolitics have put enterprise data centers in the crosshairs of international espionage. From all corners of the globe, hackers of all sorts, including those aligned with national spy agencies, are zeroing in on hardware roots of trust.

    For any computing platform, the root of trust is the ultimate line of defense against cybersecurity attacks. No matter how secure your operating system and applications appear to be, they are acutely vulnerable if running on a hardware platform whose root of trust has been compromised by an unauthorized party.

  • Cloud Print becomes the latest product to face Google death squad

    At the end of 2020, after over a decade in beta, Google will pick up its product-ending shotgun and take Cloud Print for a talk behind the back shed, from which it will never return.

    "Beginning January 1, 2021, devices across all operating systems will no longer be able to print using Google Cloud Print," Google said in a support note.

    "We recommend that over the next year, you identify an alternative solution and execute a migration strategy."

    Last week for its own Chrome OS operating system, Google added CUPS printing, which it will use instead of Cloud Print.

  • Google shuts down its Cloud Print service after 10-year Beta

    Google revealed plans to shut down Cloud Print, a cloud-based printing solution, at the end of 2020 permanently.

    The company launched Cloud Print back in 2010 as a solution to print from any Internet connected device to compatible printers. The main benefit of the solution was that users did not have to install printer drivers on their client devices and that devices did not need to be in the same local network as the printer. The solution enabled printing on devices without official support from the printer's manufacturer or drivers for that particular device.

    On Windows users could install the Google Cloud Printer application to add cloud printing functionality to the operating system.

  • Google Cloud Print will be shut down on December 31, 2020

    After offering printing from any device, from any location, to any web-connected printer with Cloud Print, Google is shutting down the service that has technically been a beta product since 2010. Cloud Print will be gone by the end of next year and users will need to find an alternative before December 31, 2020. Chrome OS, which originally relied on Cloud Print entirely for printing needs, eschewing the need to develop native printing controls, is now going full native.

    Chrome OS already handles some administrative tasks for printers that use the Common Unix Printing System (CUPS). Google promises to expand administrative options through the end of the year, and add more robust support for external print servers and other security policy administration in 2020. Since Chrome OS and its apps relied entirely on Cloud Print, Google will also be developing APIs for third-party developers to handle printing tasks.

Why You Should Be Using Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

How many times have you been happily working away when, out of nowhere, Windows either forced a reboot to update, stopped responding, or completely crashed? With Linux, those events are a thing of the past. Because of the way Linux was designed, you (the user) have complete control over nearly everything.

Say, for example, an application fails on you. Instead of that application taking the entire desktop along for the ride (an issue that often stumps even software development providers), you can log into what’s called a virtual console and force that crashed application closed via the command line. Yes, that does take a bit more skill than the average user possesses, but once you know how it’s done, it becomes second nature.

The likelihood of that actually happening, however, is low. The few instances where this has happened to me was due to my using beta or “nightly” releases of software, which the average user wouldn’t be working with.

Linux simply works and works with an almost unheard of reliability.

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Industrial-grade Linux OS gets Over-the-Air updates

Filed under
OS
Linux

Modern embedded systems need a reliable and secure way to deliver software updates remotely. Toradex aims to accomplish this by publishing critical operating system updates to customers with devices running TorizonCore, an easy-to-use industrial-grade Linux OS.
The system will provide full control over which updates and when these updates are pushed to their devices by way of a web interface. Additionally, customers will be able to push their own updates to their devices using the same OTA system.

Managing deployed devices is made easy by providing a high-level view of all devices and their current status. Grouping devices together into fleets is supported and makes managing updates for many devices easy. Every device publishes information up to the server which can prove useful for evaluating device health, inconsistencies in deployed devices, etc.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE Development Report

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/47

    Another week, in which openQA did block some of the snapshots – and some issues it was unfortunately not able to see. Anyway, during the week 2019/47 we have released three snapshot into the wild (1116, 1118 and 1119), containing those changes:

    Mesa 19.2.4: fixes critical rendering issues from earlier Mesa 19.2.3. As this rendering issue did not happen on all graphics adapters, openQA had no chance of spotting it
    Linux kernel 5.3.11
    KDE Plasma 5.17.3
    Subversion 1.13.0
    binutils 2.33.1

  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST Development Sprints 88 and 89

    A few weeks ago, we wrote about the new ItemSelector widget that is finding its way into YaST user interfaces. It turned out that just a simple on/off status is not enough in some cases, so we had to extend that concept. For example, software modules may have dependencies, and we want to show the difference between one that was explicitly selected by the user and one that was auto-selected because some other software module requires it.

    This kind of shook the foundations of the underlying classes; all of a sudden a bit is no longer just a bit, but it needs to be broken down into even smaller pieces. Well, we cheated; we now use integer values instead. Most of the class hierarchy still only uses 0 and 1, but the new YCustomStatusItemSelector also supports using higher numbers for application-defined purposes.

    For each possible status value, the application defines the name of the icon to be displayed (for graphical UIs like the Qt UI), the text equivalent (for text mode / the NCurses UI), and an optional nextStatus which tells the widget what status to cycle to when the user changes the status of an item with a mouse click or with the keyboard. A value of -1 lets the application handle this.

    So this is not a one-trick-pony that is useful only for that one use case (the software modules), but a generic tool that might find good uses in other places all over YaST as well.

KDE's Plasma Mobile Now Supports Phone Calls on the PinePhone Linux Smartphone

Filed under
KDE
Linux

As we reported earlier this month, KDE Plasma Mobile is already running well on the PinePhone, but not all things are working properly, such as phone calls, which the Plasma Mobile team reports that they managed to add multiple patches to integrate telephony functions with the graphical UI.

"Bhushan Shah submitted multiple patches in postmarketOS to integrate telephony functions with user interface. Using which PINE64 Pinephone can connect calls from user interface. Currently audio is a work in progress however, and we hope to have this resolved soon," said the Plasma Mobile team.

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Chromium and Mozilla: ARM, TenFourFox and Firefox Engineers

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Arm Has Been Working To Boost The Chrome/Chromium Browser Performance

    Arm engineers have been working to speed-up the open-source Chromium web browser on 64-bit ARM (AArch64) and ultimately to flow back into Google's Chrome releases. Their focus has been around Windows-on-Arm with the growing number of Windows Arm laptops coming to market, but the Chromium optimizations also benefit the browser on Linux too.

    Arm has been focusing on Chromium optimizations not only for the Chromium/Chrome browsers itself but also for software leveraging the likes of CEF and Electron that rely upon Chromium code for rendering.

  • TenFourFox FPR17b1 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 17 beta 1 is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). SourceForge seems to have fixed whatever was making TenFourFox barf on its end which now might actually be an issue over key exchange. For a variety of reasons, but most importantly backwards compatibility, my preference has been to patch up the NSS security library in TenFourFox to support new crypto and ciphers rather than just drop in a later version. We will see if the issue recurs.

    This release fixes the "infinite loop" issue on Github with a trivial "hack" mitigation. This mitigation makes JavaScript slightly faster as a side-effect but it's because it relaxes some syntax constraints in the runtime, so I don't consider this a win really. It also gets rid of some debug-specific functions that are web-observable and clashed on a few pages, an error Firefox corrected some time ago but missed my notice. Additionally, since 68ESR newly adds the ability to generate and click on links without embedding them in the DOM, I backported that patch so that we can do that now too (a 4-year-old bug only recently addressed in Firefox 70). Apparently this functionality is required for certain sites' download features and evidently this was important enough to merit putting in an extended support release, so we will follow suit.

    I also did an update to cookie security, with more to come, and cleared my backlog of some old performance patches I had been meaning to backport. The most important of these substantially reduces the amount of junk strings JavaScript has hanging around, which in turn reduces memory pressure (important on our 32-bit systems) and garbage collection frequency. Another enables a fast path for layout frames with no properties so we don't have to check the hash tables as frequently.

  • Week notes - 2019 w47 - worklog

    Week Notes. I'm not sure I will be able to commit to this. But they have a bit of revival around my blogging reading echo chamber. Per revival, I mean I see them again.

    The Open Data Institute just started one with a round about them. I subscribed again to the feed of Brian Suda and his own week notes. Alice Bartlett has also a very cool personal, down to earth and simple summary of her week. I love that she calls them weaknotes She's on week 63 by now.

  • Marco Zehe: My extended advent calendar

    This year, I have a special treat for my readers. On Monday, November 25, at 12 PM UTC, I will start a 30 day series about everything and anything. Could be an accessibility tip, an how-to about using a feature in an app I use frequently, some personal opinion on something, a link to something great I came across on the web… I am totally not certain yet. I have ideas about some things I want to blog about, but by far not 30 of them yet.

Cleverly Reimagined Slax Distro Pushes Portable Linux's Limits

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Slax runs on a wide range of different file systems, including EXT (ext2,ext3,ext4), btrfs, and even FAT and NTFS.

It took me about one hour to download the must-have computing applications and accessory tools that fit my needs. The installation of each program takes longer than a distro installed to a hard drive. USB drives are much slower than an internal hard drive.

Once I had all of my needed software up and running, I generally was pleased with how Slax Linux performed.

Slax is not a perfect Linux platform, at least not yet -- but for me its convenience and flexibility outweigh its current shortcomings.

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IBM: SystemD, Red Hat Stuff and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • systemd 244-RC1 Released With Many Changes

    It looks like a big new systemd release will be out in time for Christmas.

    The first release candidate of systemd 244 was made available today for testing. Systemd 244-RC1 has also already been uploaded to the likes of Fedora Rawhide for further vetting.

  • Artificial Intelligence Apps with TensorFlow and Joget on OpenShift

    Containers and Kubernetes are key to accelerating the ML lifecycle as these technologies provide data scientists the much needed agility, flexibility, portability, and scalability to train, test, and deploy ML models. 

    Red Hat OpenShift is the industry’s leading containers and Kubernetes hybrid cloud platform. It provides all the above benefits, and through the integrated DevOps capabilities and integration with hardware accelerators, OpenShift enables better collaboration between data scientists and software developers. This helps accelerate the roll out of intelligent applications across hybrid cloud (data center, edge, and public clouds).

    Joget is an open source no-code/low-code application platform that empowers non-coders to visually build and maintain apps anytime, anywhere. By accelerating and democratizing app development, Joget is a natural fit for modern Kubernetes Hybrid Cloud platforms like Red Hat OpenShift. 

  • Break down support system silos with agile integration and modernize telco customer and network operations

    When any systems – including communications service provider (CSP) operations support systems (OSS) and business support systems (BSS) – are delivered with a narrow, siloed purpose, they tend to be pretty inflexible. As CSPs look to transform their businesses for success in increasingly competitive and dynamic markets, this inflexibility can stall their modernization efforts.

    Service providers rely on OSS/BSS to support their services. But for many providers, their OSS/BSS generally lack interoperability. This can limit the exchange of data and access to metrics needed to synthesize more holistic views and address complex problems among the disparate systems. Bottom line: without close integration between OSS and BSS, CSPs may struggle to become digital service providers.

  • Fedora Atomic Host Nearing End Of Life

    Fedora 29 will be End Of Life soon. With it Fedora Atomic Host will have its last incremental release (based on the Fedora 29 stream). Please move to the Fedora CoreOS preview if you can.

    Last year we introduced the plans for Fedora CoreOS including that Fedora CoreOS would be the successor to Fedora Atomic Host and Container Linux (from CoreOS Inc.). As part of that succession plan we decided that Fedora 29 Atomic Host would be the last stream of Fedora Atomic Host to be released.

    Fedora 29 Atomic Host has served us well, but with Fedora 29 End of Life coming soon , so will the last release of Fedora 29 Atomic Host. The next release of Fedora 29 Atomic Host (in the next few weeks) will be the last two-week release. It will contain all of the latest content from Fedora 29. After that release, Fedora 29, and Fedora 29 Atomic Host will no longer receive any updates.

  • PHP version 7.2.25 and 7.3.12

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.12 are available in remi repository for Fedora 30-31 and in remi-php73 repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.25 are available in remi repository for Fedora 29 and in remi-php72 repository for Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

  • Sharing Fedora

    For example, if you go out to lunch with a group of colleagues periodically, you might find it natural to talk about Fedora with them. If someone shows interest, you can suggest to get together with them for a Fedora show and tell. There isn’t any need for formal presentations or prepared talks. This is just having lunch and sharing information with people you know.

    When you’re with friends, relatives, colleagues, or neighbors, conversation often turns to things computer related, and you can bring up Fedora. There are usually opportunities to point out how Fedora would partially if not completely address their concerns or provide something they want.

    These are people you know so talking with them is easy and natural. You probably know the kind of things they use PCs for, so you know the features of Fedora that will be attractive to them. Such conversations can start anytime you see someone you know. You don’t need to steer conversations toward Fedora — that might be impolite, depending on the situation. But if they bring up computer related issues, you might find an opportunity to talk about Fedora.

Mesa 19.2.6

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Hi list,

I'm releasing a new mesa 19.2.x release to address being unable to compile on
PPC due to a bad backport. There are a couple of additional patches in here
because I didn't want to tease them apart and they're all stable anyway.

Dylan

Shortlog
========

Alejandro Piñeiro (1):
      v3d: adds an extra MOV for any sig.ld*

Dave Airlie (1):
      llvmpipe/ppc: fix if/ifdef confusion in backport.

Dylan Baker (4):
      docs/relnotes/19.2.5: Add SHA256 sum
      meson: generate .pc files for gles and gles2 with old glvnd
      docs: Add release notes for 19.2.6
      VERSION: bumpre to 19.2.6

Eric Engestrom (1):
      vulkan: delete typo'd header

Hyunjun Ko (1):
      freedreno/ir3: fix printing output registers of FS.

Jose Maria Casanova Crespo (1):
      v3d: Fix predication with atomic image operations

Yevhenii Kolesnikov (1):
      glsl: Enable textureSize for samplerExternalOES



git tag: mesa-19.2.6

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Also: Mesa 19.2.6 Released Due To POWER Fallout

GNU Guile 2.9.5 (beta) released

Filed under
Development
GNU

We are delighted to announce GNU Guile 2.9.5, the fifth beta release in preparation for the upcoming 3.0 stable series. See the release announcement for full details and a download link.

Besides the usual set of optimizations, this release adds an --r6rs option for better R6RS support out of the box, and also adds a new --r7rs corresponding to R&RS. Guile's core exception handling has also been rebased onto the raise-exception and with-exception-handler primitives, enabling better compatibility going forward with structured exception objects, which are more common in the broader Scheme community than Guile's old throw and catch.

GNU Guile 2.9.5 is a beta release, and as such offers no API or ABI stability guarantees. Users needing a stable Guile are advised to stay on the stable 2.2 series.

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webOS Open Source Edition 2.1 Released For Continuing The Palm/HP/LG Linux Distro

Filed under
OS
Linux
Gadgets

Released at the end of October to little fanfare was webOS Open Source Edition 2.0, the open-source Linux OS currently in development by LG for use on their Smart TVs and other digital products. With webOS Open Source Edition 2.0, they began setting their sights on automobiles and other potential use-cases. That was then extended by this week's release of webOS OSE 2.1.

WebOS Open Source Edition is the open-source spin of this Linux OS that has been controlled by LG Electronics now for the past number of years. This is the operating system formerly developed at Palm a decade ago already before being acquired by HP. The initial webOS Open-Source Edition came last year while this second installment arrived at the end of October.

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Direct: webOS OSE 2.1.0 Release

Security: Patches, Roboto Drama and Android/Google

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (dpdk, mingw-djvulibre, mingw-hunspell, mingw-ilmbase, mingw-OpenEXR, php-symfony, php-symfony3, and rsyslog), openSUSE (chromium and squid), SUSE (aspell, cups, djvulibre, and dpdk), and Ubuntu (djvulibre).

  • Roboto Botnet network building, DDoS not a priority
  • Google quintuples top reward for hacking Android to $1 million

    Google, which has already paid security researchers over $15 million since launching its bug bounty program in 2010, today expanded its Android Security Rewards program. Most notably, the company is introducing a top prize of $1 million. The previous top prize was $200,000. That’s technically a quintupling, although the maximum reward could be even higher. Google is launching a 50% bonus for exploits found on specific developer preview versions of Android, meaning the top reward could net you $1.5 million.

  • Bad Binder: Android In-The-Wild Exploit (Project Zero)

    Over on the Project Zero blog, Maddie Stone has a lengthy post about a zero-day exploit that was found and fixed in the Android Binder interprocess communication mechanism. The post details the search for the problem, which was apparently being used in the wild, its fix, and how it can be exploited. This is all part of an effort to "make zero-day hard"; one of the steps the project is taking is to disseminate more information on these bugs.

  • Bad Binder: Android In-The-Wild Exploit

    On October 3, 2019, we disclosed issue 1942 (CVE-2019-2215), which is a use-after-free in Binder in the Android kernel. The bug is a local privilege escalation vulnerability that allows for a full compromise of a vulnerable device. If chained with a browser renderer exploit, this bug could fully compromise a device through a malicious website.

    We reported this bug under a 7-day disclosure deadline rather than the normal 90-day disclosure deadline. We made this decision based on credible evidence that an exploit for this vulnerability exists in the wild and that it's highly likely that the exploit was being actively used against users.

    In May 2019, Project Zero published a blog post and spreadsheet for tracking “in-the-wild” 0-day exploits. In July 2019, I joined Project Zero to focus on the use of 0-day exploits in the wild. We expect our approach to this work will change and mature as we gain more experience with studying 0-days, but the mission stays the same: to “make zero-day hard”.

A Review of GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.34

Filed under
GNOME

The last GNOME release, named “Thessaloniki”, was busy for GNOME Shell and Mutter. Many changes, ranging from code cleanups to architectural changes to performance improvements to new features landed.

Let’s take a look at the major highlights for the GNOME 3.34 release.

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Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Python CSV

    A CSV (Comma Separated Values) format is one of the most simple and common ways to store tabular data. To represent a CSV file, it must be saved with the .csv file extension.

  • Python, Javascript, and Web automation

    In the last few months, I've been trying to compare the languages that I've worked with so far. The reason being, I often find myself in situations when I have a task at hand, and I realize there are multiple different ways to do it in multiple languages, and I get analysis paralysis.

    Anyways, the focus of this post is Python, Javascript, and their use in Web automation. To be fair, both languages have different histories and evolved very differently, but web automation is one area that I feel where both languages have something to offer. I'll try to compare Python and Javascript in the context of different usage patterns and ways of performing web automation.

  • Higher Performance Python (ODSC 2019)

    Building on PyDataCambridge last week I had the additional pleasure of talking on Higher Performance Python at ODSC 2019 yesterday.

  • Transferring Files Using Python’s Built-in HTTP Server

    The need to transfer files over a network is one that arises often. GNU/Linux systems support multiple protocols and tools for doing so, some of which are designed for somewhat permanent file sharing (such as SMB, AFP, and NFS), while others such as Secure Copy (SCP) are used for quick manual and scripted file transfers. Among these is the HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP), the versatile and ubiquitous protocol on which the World Wide Web relies.

    Python, which is included by default in most Linux distributions, provides simple HTTP servers through the “SimpleHTTPServer” and “http.server” modules. The former is found in the Python 2 Standard Library, while the latter is included in Python 3. These lightweight HTTP servers require no separate installation and can be started instantly with a single command.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Porteus Linux: A portable Linux with a difference

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I’m writing this in Porteus Linux v5.0rc1 for x86_64, a Live Linux distribution booted from a USB pendrive. It is fast, good-looking and has a good range of applications and utilities. I stumbled upon Porteus recently while looking for a compact Live Linux distribution to install on a couple of spare SD cards. It seemed ideal, as it is a portable distribution designed for USB pendrives and CDs, and optionally can be configured to be persistent between reboots and shutdowns. Porteus is based on Slackware, although I gather the developers might switch to Arch Linux at some undefined future date. Spins of Porteus with various Desktop Environments are available, and I settled on Xfce after trying a couple of the others.

Although my original objective was to install a portable Linux distribution on SD cards, I only managed to install Porteus on an SD card by using YUMI Multiboot USB Creator for Windows, which I run using WINE in Linux, rather than in Windows. The reason Porteus boots from an SD card when installed by YUMI is because YUMI installs its own boot manager on the SD card and chainloads the OS. Actually, if an SD card or USB pendrive has sufficient capacity, YUMI can install several OSs on a single SD card or single USB pendrive and you can choose on the YUMI bootloader menu which OS to boot.

Anyway, Porteus is interesting because, optionally, it can be configured quite easily to be persistent. I.e. if you want it to, Porteus can save new files, applications you install, browser bookmarks, edited configuration files and so on between reboots/shutdowns. However, I was unable to get persistence working with Porteus installed by YUMI on an SD card, but persistence works perfectly when I install Porteus on USB pendrives, which is the medium Porteus is really designed to be installed on.

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Nvidia Outs New Linux/BSD Graphics Driver with GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER Support

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

For Linux- and BSD-based platforms, the Nvidia 440.36 proprietary graphics driver is here to add support for the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card, which Nvidia claims it's up to 50 percent faster than the original GTX 1650 and up to 2X faster than the previous-generation GTX 1050.

Now BSD and Linux gamers who bought an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER GPU can use it to play games at full performance if they install the Nvidia 440.36 proprietary graphics driver, which is available to download only for 64-bit operating systems from Nvidia.com or via our free software portal here and here.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E33 – The Sentinel

    This week we’ve been to the Linux Application Summit in Barcelona. We round up news from the Ubuntu and desktop Linux community and bring you our picks from the wider tech news. It’s Season 12 Episode 33 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Kubernetes and the misconception of multi-cloud portability
  • Linux 5.5 To Finally Expose NVMe Drive Temperatures Via HWMON

    Linux for years has supported monitoring NVMe drive temperatures when installing the nvme user-space utility and run as root, etc. But now finally with Linux 5.5 the kernel is supporting NVMe drive temperature reporting through the hardware monitoring "HWMON" infrastructure alongside other hardware sensors. Come the Linux 5.5 stable release in early 2020 is the NVMe HWMON support to allow reporting the current NVMe drive temperature sensor(s) and min/max thresholds via this kernel infrastructure. This in turn allows user-space to simply query the data over sysfs without the need for any utilities, no root requirement, and should gracefully work with the various programs that report HWMON sensor readings to Linux desktop users.

  • PHP 5.3 To PHP 7.4 Performance Benchmarks On AMD EPYC

    With the big PHP 7.4.0 release due out next week, yesterday we published our PHP 7.4.0 benchmarks using the near-final build for this annual update to PHP. Those benchmarks compared previous releases as far back as PHP 5.6. But out of curiosity after that article I went to do some benchmarks going back to PHP 5.3 through PHP 7.4 and PHP 8.0-dev. With the AMD EPYC 7642 server running Ubuntu 19.10 used in yesterday's article, I ran the final PHP 5.3/5.4/5.5 benchmarks added in to yesterday's data. So for those curious how the historical PHP5 performance compares to the imminent PHP 7.4, these benchmarks are for your enjoyment today.

  • Wine Patches Coming To Allow UMIP Emulation - Works Around Issues For Ryzen 3000

    Coming up this weekend with the Linux 5.4 kernel is emulation/spoofing of the SGDT/SIDT/SMSW instructions around UMIP for allowing newer 64-bit Windows games to run on Wine and Steam Play (Proton). With newer CPUs like the AMD Ryzen 3000 series that support UMIP, these instructions are not allowed to run in user-space with Wine due to UMIP. So while the first stable kernel release is about to land with this support, some Wine-based emulation not contingent on the kernel patches is also in the works.

  • The different way to check whether you are using a 32-bit or 64-bit version of Linux on your computer
  • KF6 Sprint - Day One

    Today we started our KF6 sprint at the MBition office in Berlin. Beside the people attending in person, we have David Faure joining us via web conference. Thanks already to the people at MBition that spend time on making it possible to host the sprint there. First stuff to be discussed were some high level things, like does the monthly release scheme work out well. Short answer: yes :) The short period works well, allows people to fix issues directly in frameworks and still have that reasonable fast provided to the users. And the overhead of release creation is low, thanks to automation.

  • Zidoo M9 is a Rockchip RK3399 TV Box/Mini PC/SBC with Dual OS Support

    Zidoo has launched several TV boxes running Android over the years, some of which we reviewed such as Zidoo X9 (2015), or Zidoo H6 Pro.

  • Goldman Sachs is planning on giving some of its most valuable software to Wall Street for free

    Goldman Sachs wants to give away some of its most valuable software. The investment bank spent countless hours over 14 years developing a platform called Alloy to help it access and analyze the growing set of financial databases being created across the firm. Now Goldman is taking the unusual step of making that program, as well as the language underlying it, available to the rest of Wall Street for free as open-source software in collaboration with a nonprofit called Finos. The software and language "have grown to become critical tools within our firm across the trade lifecycle that help us price, assess and evaluate risk, clear transactions, and perform regulatory reporting," said Neema Raphael, co-chief data officer at Goldman. By making it publicly available, "we'll unlock tremendous value for the industry when we co-develop and share models."

  • Open source transparency comes to root of trust hardware

    Geopolitics have put enterprise data centers in the crosshairs of international espionage. From all corners of the globe, hackers of all sorts, including those aligned with national spy agencies, are zeroing in on hardware roots of trust. For any computing platform, the root of trust is the ultimate line of defense against cybersecurity attacks. No matter how secure your operating system and applications appear to be, they are acutely vulnerable if running on a hardware platform whose root of trust has been compromised by an unauthorized party.

  • Cloud Print becomes the latest product to face Google death squad

    At the end of 2020, after over a decade in beta, Google will pick up its product-ending shotgun and take Cloud Print for a talk behind the back shed, from which it will never return. "Beginning January 1, 2021, devices across all operating systems will no longer be able to print using Google Cloud Print," Google said in a support note. "We recommend that over the next year, you identify an alternative solution and execute a migration strategy." Last week for its own Chrome OS operating system, Google added CUPS printing, which it will use instead of Cloud Print.

  • Google shuts down its Cloud Print service after 10-year Beta

    Google revealed plans to shut down Cloud Print, a cloud-based printing solution, at the end of 2020 permanently. The company launched Cloud Print back in 2010 as a solution to print from any Internet connected device to compatible printers. The main benefit of the solution was that users did not have to install printer drivers on their client devices and that devices did not need to be in the same local network as the printer. The solution enabled printing on devices without official support from the printer's manufacturer or drivers for that particular device. On Windows users could install the Google Cloud Printer application to add cloud printing functionality to the operating system.

  • Google Cloud Print will be shut down on December 31, 2020

    After offering printing from any device, from any location, to any web-connected printer with Cloud Print, Google is shutting down the service that has technically been a beta product since 2010. Cloud Print will be gone by the end of next year and users will need to find an alternative before December 31, 2020. Chrome OS, which originally relied on Cloud Print entirely for printing needs, eschewing the need to develop native printing controls, is now going full native. Chrome OS already handles some administrative tasks for printers that use the Common Unix Printing System (CUPS). Google promises to expand administrative options through the end of the year, and add more robust support for external print servers and other security policy administration in 2020. Since Chrome OS and its apps relied entirely on Cloud Print, Google will also be developing APIs for third-party developers to handle printing tasks.

Why You Should Be Using Linux

How many times have you been happily working away when, out of nowhere, Windows either forced a reboot to update, stopped responding, or completely crashed? With Linux, those events are a thing of the past. Because of the way Linux was designed, you (the user) have complete control over nearly everything. Say, for example, an application fails on you. Instead of that application taking the entire desktop along for the ride (an issue that often stumps even software development providers), you can log into what’s called a virtual console and force that crashed application closed via the command line. Yes, that does take a bit more skill than the average user possesses, but once you know how it’s done, it becomes second nature. The likelihood of that actually happening, however, is low. The few instances where this has happened to me was due to my using beta or “nightly” releases of software, which the average user wouldn’t be working with. Linux simply works and works with an almost unheard of reliability. Read more

Industrial-grade Linux OS gets Over-the-Air updates

Modern embedded systems need a reliable and secure way to deliver software updates remotely. Toradex aims to accomplish this by publishing critical operating system updates to customers with devices running TorizonCore, an easy-to-use industrial-grade Linux OS. The system will provide full control over which updates and when these updates are pushed to their devices by way of a web interface. Additionally, customers will be able to push their own updates to their devices using the same OTA system. Managing deployed devices is made easy by providing a high-level view of all devices and their current status. Grouping devices together into fleets is supported and makes managing updates for many devices easy. Every device publishes information up to the server which can prove useful for evaluating device health, inconsistencies in deployed devices, etc. Read more

SUSE/OpenSUSE Development Report

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/47

    Another week, in which openQA did block some of the snapshots – and some issues it was unfortunately not able to see. Anyway, during the week 2019/47 we have released three snapshot into the wild (1116, 1118 and 1119), containing those changes: Mesa 19.2.4: fixes critical rendering issues from earlier Mesa 19.2.3. As this rendering issue did not happen on all graphics adapters, openQA had no chance of spotting it Linux kernel 5.3.11 KDE Plasma 5.17.3 Subversion 1.13.0 binutils 2.33.1

  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST Development Sprints 88 and 89

    A few weeks ago, we wrote about the new ItemSelector widget that is finding its way into YaST user interfaces. It turned out that just a simple on/off status is not enough in some cases, so we had to extend that concept. For example, software modules may have dependencies, and we want to show the difference between one that was explicitly selected by the user and one that was auto-selected because some other software module requires it. This kind of shook the foundations of the underlying classes; all of a sudden a bit is no longer just a bit, but it needs to be broken down into even smaller pieces. Well, we cheated; we now use integer values instead. Most of the class hierarchy still only uses 0 and 1, but the new YCustomStatusItemSelector also supports using higher numbers for application-defined purposes. For each possible status value, the application defines the name of the icon to be displayed (for graphical UIs like the Qt UI), the text equivalent (for text mode / the NCurses UI), and an optional nextStatus which tells the widget what status to cycle to when the user changes the status of an item with a mouse click or with the keyboard. A value of -1 lets the application handle this. So this is not a one-trick-pony that is useful only for that one use case (the software modules), but a generic tool that might find good uses in other places all over YaST as well.