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Wednesday, 21 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Now and Then: The Fate of 15 Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

A typical desktop Linux distribution consists of various software components including the Linux kernel, a broad collection of programming tools produced by the GNU Project, a graphical server, and other free and open source software.

Due to Linux’s open source nature, there are many hundreds of actively maintained distributions or ‘distros’ of the OS. Linux distros are like Linux software in general. They come and (some) go.

Back in 2006, Distrowatch ranked the following distributions in terms of page hit ranking1. The top ranked distro was Ubuntu. The other places were taken by openSUSE, Fedora, MEPIS, Mandriva, Damn Small, Debian, PCLinuxOS, Slackware, Gentoo, KNOPPIX, FreeBSD, Kubuntu, VectorLinux, and CentOS.

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How anyone can contribute to open source software in their job

Filed under
OSS

Imagine a world where your software works perfectly for you. It meets your needs, does things your way, and is the ideal tool to achieve great things toward your goals.

Open source software stems from these roots. Many projects are built by engineers that have a problem and build a solution to solve it. Then they openly share their solution with others to use and improve.

Unfortunately, building software is hard. Not everyone has the expertise to build software that works perfectly for their needs. And if the software developers building applications don't fully understand users' needs and how they do their job, the solutions they build may not meet the users' needs and may accidentally create a lot of gaps.

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5 open source tools I can't live without

Filed under
OSS

Some time ago, I engaged with a Twitter thread that went viral among techies. The challenge? Pick only five tools that you cannot live without. I started to think about this in relation to my everyday life, and picking just five tools was not easy. I use many tools that I consider essential, such as my IRC client to connect with my colleagues and friends (yes, I still use IRC), a good text editor to hack on things, a calendar app to keep organized, and a videoconferencing platform when more direct interaction is needed.

So let me put a twist on this challenge: Pick just five open source tools that boost your productivity. Here's my list; please share yours in the comments.

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How to Install Microsoft Edge Browser in Ubuntu and Other Linux

Filed under
Linux

This guide explains the steps required to install Microsoft Edge Browser in Ubuntu and Other Linux. We explain both graphical and UI methods.
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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • A Quick Look At Ubuntu 20.04 LTS vs. 20.10 With The Core i9 10900K - Phoronix

    With Ubuntu 20.10 due for release this week I have begun testing near-final Ubuntu 20.10 builds on many more systems in the lab. Larger than our normal distribution/OS comparisons, here is the culmination of running hundreds of benchmarks (366 tests to be exact) under both Ubuntu 20.04 LTS with all available updates and then again on the Ubuntu 20.10 development state while testing on Intel Comet Lake.
    Aside from specific improvements for bleeding-edge hardware like Intel Tiger Lake performing better on Ubuntu 20.10 or when looking at cases like the Intel and Radeon graphics performance being better on Ubuntu 20.10 due to the newer Linux kernel and Mesa, for general CPU/system workloads the performance has largely been found to be similar to that of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.
    The other caveat is for workloads being built from source, Ubuntu 20.10 now ships with GCC 10 rather than GCC 9. GCC 10 doesn't normally yield any night-and-day differences in performance but in some cases for newer CPU microarchitectures there has been some improvements there or with features like LTO.

  • TSDgeos' blog: Make sure KDE software is usable in your language, join KDE translations!

    Translations are a vital part of software. More technical people often overlook it because they understand English well enough to use the software untranslated, but only 15% of the World understands English, so it's clear we need good translations to make our software more useful to the rest of the world.

    Translations are a place that [almost] always needs help, so I would encourage you to me (aacid@kde.org) if you are interested in helping.

    Sadly, some of our teams are not very active, so you may find yourself alone, it can be a bit daunting at the beginning, but the rest of us in kde-i18n-doc will help you along the way Smile

  • News – WordPress 5.6 Beta 1 – WordPress.org

    WordPress 5.6 Beta 1 is now available for testing!

    This software is still in development, so we recommend that you run this version on a test site.

    [...]

    The current target for final release is December 8, 2020. This is just seven weeks away, so your help is needed to ensure this release is tested properly.

  • Google Patches Bug Used in Active Attacks Against Chrome

    Google has discovered and patched a serious vulnerability in Chrome that attackers are actively exploiting at the moment.
    The bug is a high-severity heap buffer overflow in FreeType, a free font-rendering engine that Chrome, among many other projects, uses. A member of Google’s Project Zero vulnerability research team discovered the vulnerability and subsequently found that attackers were already exploiting it. Google patched the flaw in Chrome 86.0.4240.111 for desktop browsers and the maintainers of the FreeType Project pushed out an emergency release of the library to fix it, as well.
    “I've just fixed a heap buffer overflow that can happen for some malformed .ttf files with PNG sbit glyphs. It seems that this vulnerability gets already actively used in the wild, so I ask all users to apply the corresponding commit as soon as possible,” Werner Lemberg, one of the original authors of the FreeType, said in an email to the FreeType announcement mailing list.

  • FreeType 2.10.4 Rushed Out As Emergency Security Release

    The FreeType text rendering library is out with version 2.10.4 today as an important security update.

  • Intel: replace thermal compound “every few years”

    Thermal compound (sometimes called thermal paste or grease) is applied to fill minuscule gaps in the materials in the heat spreader (the metal covering on top of the processor) and the heatsink. Eliminating these gaps is essential to ensuring efficient heat transfer into the heatsink.

    The thermal compound that is used in your computer generally won’t go bad or degrade in its useful lifespan. It will get displaced over time, however. You’d need higher temperatures than what you’ll typically find in a computer for other failure modes to come into effect.

    The displacement is caused by thermal cycling that results in an effect known as “thermally induced pump-out.” As the components heat up and cool down, the processors’ heat spreader (its metal top) and the heatsink will expand and contract. This effect will, over time, pump the thermal compound out from in between the two metal plates. You can find illustrations and a more technical explanation in the source links below.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

  • IBM Launches Call For Code For Racial Justice [Ed: IBM trying to flip reality on its head]

    These include Police & Judicial Reform and Accountability; Diverse Representation; and Policy & Legislation Reform.

  • Node.js 15 release: Updated handling of rejections, npm 7, N-API Version 7, and more – IBM Developer

    Users can plan for a new release every April and October, with the latest even-numbered release (14.x, in this instance) being promoted to LTS in October. Since the 15.x release is an odd-numbered release, it won’t be promoted to LTS. The predictable timetable for quality releases has increased adoption of the next LTS release over time. In general we recommend that only LTS releases be used for production deployments.

    Today, the Node.js community is releasing Node.js 15 with new features that are important to Node.js users and customers. While it won’t be promoted to long-term support (LTS), we need our customers and the greater ecosystem to try it out and give us feedback to help pave the way for the Node.js 16 release.

  • Key findings from IDC Red Hat Quarkus Lab Validation

    Recently, Arnal Dayaratna, a research director and analystocused on Software Development at IDC, explored Quarkus in an IDC Lab Validation report, sponsored by Red Hat. The report quantifies performance metrics forQuarkus to another widely used Java framework for cloud-native development, referred to throughout as Framework A. The comparison is based on attributes that are important for developers and the developer experience, as well as those that are important for containers, Kubernetes and cloud deployments.

  • Accelerated development cycle enables Macquarie deployments in near real time, addressing business and technical challenges

    As companies continue their quest for digital transformation and face uncertainty in the business environment, especially in current times, the ability to react in an agile manner to address customers’ needs is increasingly apparent. It is a proven strategy cited by industry research and consulting firms, and has delivered results for Macquarie’s Banking and Financial Services Group (BFS), as it modernizes its legacy banking systems.

Establishing ‘Open Infrastructure Foundation’

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Over 60 Global Organizations Join in Establishing ‘Open Infrastructure Foundation’ to Build the Next Decade of Infrastructure for AI, 5G, Edge
  • OpenStack Foundation Becomes Open Infrastructure Foundation

    The OpenStack Foundation is changing its name to the Open Infrastructure Foundation (OIF), a move that mirrors the rebranding of the project’s OpenStack Summit to Open Infrastructure Summit. The changes, according to the press release, reflect “an expansion of the organization’s mission, scope and community to advance open source over the next decade to support open infrastructure.”

    As Frederic Lardinois reports for TechCrunch, the OpenStack project itself, “which helps enterprises run their private cloud, found its niche in the telecom space, though, and continues to thrive as one of the world’s most active open source projects.” Last week, OpenStack released a new major version (called Victoria), which includes more than 20,000 code changes.

  • 10 Years of OpenStack – Ghanshyam Mann at NEC

    Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you.

    Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful.

    [...]

    What advice do you have for the Stacker community and other growing open source communities based on your experience with OpenStack?

    I have my team working in different open source communities and discuss daily on how each community works and solves the issue. Based on that, I found the OpenStack community is more open and transparent (our four opens strength). We might not be perfect but we are definitely one of the best open source communities.

    There is no specific advice as such, but I will suggest keep doing the same and never compromise on defined four opens principles.

Mozilla: Rust, Volunteers and Spying

Filed under
Moz/FF

  • Marking issues as regressions

    The Rust project gets many issues filed every day, and we need to keep track of them all to make sure we don't miss anything. To do that we use GitHub's issue labels feature, and we need your help to make sure we fix regressions as soon as possible!

    We have many issue labels that help us organize our issues, and we have a few in particular that mark an issue as a regression. These labels will ping a Rust working group called the prioritization working group, whose members will work to determine the severity of an issue and then prioritize it. But, this won't happen unless someone marks the issue with one of those labels!

  • New Contributors, Firefox 82 – about:community

    With Firefox 82 hot off the byte presses, we are pleased to welcome the developers whose first code contributions shipped in this release, 18 of whom were new volunteers!

  • Defining Data Intuition

    Last week, one of my peers asked me to explain what I meant by "Data Intuition", and I realized I really didn't have a good definition. That's a problem! I refer to data intuition all the time!

    Data intuition is one of the three skills I interview new data scientists for (along with statistics and technical skills). In fact, I just spent the first nine months of 2020 building Mozilla's data intuition. I'm really surprised to realize I can't point to a good explanation of what I'm trying to cultivate.

  • Five-Year Moziversary – chuttenblog

    In team news, Georg’s short break turned into the neverending kind as he left Mozilla late last year. We gained Michael Droettboom as our new fearless leader, and from my perspective he seems to be doing quite well at the managery things. Bea and Travis, our two newer team members, have really stepped into their roles well, providing much needed bench depth on Rust and Mobile. And Jan-Erik has taken over leadership of the SDK, freeing up Alessio to think about data collection for Web Extensions.

    2020 is indeed being the Year of Glean on the Desktop with several projects already embedding the now-successful Glean SDK, including our very own mach (Firefox Build Tooling Commandline) and mozregression (Firefox Bug Regression Window Finding Tool). Oh, and Jan-Erik and I’ve spent ten months planning and executing on Project FOG (Firefox on Glean) (maybe you’ve heard of it), on track (more or less) to be able to recommend it for all new data collections by the end of the year.

LibreOffice and ODF

Filed under
LibO
  • LibreOffice Math Guide 7.0 is Published - The Document Foundation Blog

    The Documentation Team is happy to announce the publication of the Math Guide 7.0, the latest update of the guide based on the recently released LibreOffice 7.0, the best open source office suite ever.

    The effort was mostly carried by Rafael Lima and reviewed by Jean H. Weber. The new guide covers were designed by Rizal Mutaqin and Drew Jensen. The final publication was carried by Olivier Hallot.

  • Tender to finish transition of LibreOffice to ODF 1.3 (ODF 1.3 delta) (#202010-01)

    The Document Foundation (TDF) is the charitable entity behind the world’s leading free/libre open source (FLOSS) office suite LibreOffice.

    We are looking for an individual or company to finish transition of LibreOffice to ODF 1.3 (ODF 1.3 delta).

  • The Document Foundation Is Looking To Finish ODF 1.3 Support In LibreOffice - Phoronix

    The ODF 1.3 Open Document Format specification was approved by the OASIS Committee at the start of the year and now as we approach the end of the year The Document Foundation is hoping to see ODF 1.3 support completed soon for this leading open-source office suite.

    The Document Foundation is now soliciting bids from developers / third-party firms to finish up the ODF 1.3 document support in LibreOffice.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • 9 Benefits of Laravel Framework for Cost-Effective Web Development - LinuxTechLab

    The success of any business depends on its ability to work quickly and with high quality. Nowadays, business development is so fast that many companies simply can’t keep up and leave the race.

    Thus, every business needs a framework that can handle the desirable high speed of work. Laravel is among such frameworks. Let’s find out what Laravel is and what the benefits of the Laravel framework for business are.

  • COBOL’s Enduring Usefulness and Digital Transformation

    These days, it’s difficult to imagine anything untouched by disruptive change, and the same applies to our IT systems. Regardless of the current setting, there are certain critical systems that simply cannot afford to fail. These are the systems that deliver too much value for organizations to be ripped out and replaced. In most cases, a business has made substantial investments in their systems over time, including the development of additional IP and processes to support it. These core systems continue to enable real benefits, and ripping them out and starting from scratch has the potential to put critical revenue at risk.

  • New Training Course Provides a Deep Dive Into Node.js Services Development

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the availability of a new training course, LFW212 – Node.js Services Development.

  • Qt 6.0 Beta Released

    There is a huge number of things to talk about when it comes to the features and functionality of Qt 6.0, so I will leave this to the multiple detailed blog posts about Qt 6.0. We have already published many blog posts about all the cool things Qt 6.0 provides, and will continue to publish more blog posts throughout the year. In the upcoming Qt World Summit Online we have lined up many interesting talks about Qt 6.0, so please join to hear more.

  • Qt 6.0 Beta Released For This Big Toolkit Update - Phoronix

    Qt 6 drops Qt Script, temporarily removes Qt Multimedia/Bluetooth/Virtual-Keyboard modules until later Qt6 releases, introduces a major overhaul to their graphics architecture to better support Vulkan and other modern graphics APIs like Metal and Direct3D 12, various other 3D improvements, next-generation QML, various tooling improvements, updated host/platform support, and more.

    Going from Qt5 to Qt6 should mean much less breakage and changes compared to the prior Qt4 to Qt5 transition. Qt 6 adoption though likely won't tick up until well into 2021 or even 2022 with the first long-term support release not being until Qt 6.2 LTS and due to time/resource constraints several modules not being ported in time for Qt 6.0 but coming later.

    More details on today's Qt 6.0 Beta via Qt.io.

USDOJ Takes on Google, Mozilla Responds

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
Legal
  • Justice Department Sues Monopolist Google For Violating Antitrust Laws

    oday, the Department of Justice — along with eleven state Attorneys General — filed a civil antitrust lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia to stop Google from unlawfully maintaining monopolies through anticompetitive and exclusionary practices in the search and search advertising markets and to remedy the competitive harms. The participating state Attorneys General offices represent Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, South Carolina, and Texas.

    “Today, millions of Americans rely on the Internet and online platforms for their daily lives. Competition in this industry is vitally important, which is why today’s challenge against Google — the gatekeeper of the Internet — for violating antitrust laws is a monumental case both for the Department of Justice and for the American people,” said Attorney General William Barr. “Since my confirmation, I have prioritized the Department’s review of online market-leading platforms to ensure that our technology industries remain competitive. This lawsuit strikes at the heart of Google’s grip over the internet for millions of American consumers, advertisers, small businesses and entrepreneurs beholden to an unlawful monopolist.”

  • Mozilla Reaction to U.S. v. Google

    Like millions of everyday internet users, we share concerns about how Big Tech’s growing power can deter innovation and reduce consumer choice. We believe that scrutiny of these issues is healthy, and critical if we’re going to build a better internet. We also know from firsthand experience there is no overnight solution to these complex issues. Mozilla’s origins are closely tied to the last major antitrust case against Microsoft in the nineties.

    In this new lawsuit, the DOJ referenced Google’s search agreement with Mozilla as one example of Google’s monopolization of the search engine market in the United States. Small and independent companies such as Mozilla thrive by innovating, disrupting and providing users with industry leading features and services in areas like search. The ultimate outcomes of an antitrust lawsuit should not cause collateral damage to the very organizations – like Mozilla – best positioned to drive competition and protect the interests of consumers on the web.

  • DOJ May Force Google To Sell Chrome To Settle Antitrust Case: Report

    he U.S. Department of Justice may force Google to sell its Chrome browser. The development came after the US Congress’ antitrust report on big tech companies.

    It is also told that the DOJ is targeting Google’s advertising business as well. The prosecutors aim at breaking Google’s monopoly on the $162 billion digital advertising market. Politico reported the development via anonymous sources.

TrueNAS R-series hyperconverged appliances blend storage and compute

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews
Debian

Today, storage vendor iXsystems is launching a new R-series hyperconverged infrastructure appliance for its TrueNAS product line—and the first alpha release of TrueNAS SCALE, a Debian Linux-based version of the TrueNAS storage distribution.

The new R-series appliances are designed to run either traditional, FreeBSD-based TrueNAS, or the new Debian-based TrueNAS SCALE. The series launches with four models—all rack-mounted—ranging from the 1U, 16-bay TrueNAS R10 to the up to 12U, 52 bay TrueNAS R50. All four models offer Ethernet connectivity up to dual 100GbE, as well as optional dual 32Gb Fibre Channel and Intel Xeon CPUs. The three larger models are expandable via separate JBOD shelves as well.

Read more

Also Debian: Petter Reinholdtsen: Buster based Bokmål edition of Debian Administrator's Handbook

Graphics: NVIDIA Issues,"Big Navi" (AMD), and NIR/Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

  • Arch Linux - News: nvidia 455.28 is incompatible with linux >= 5.9

    nvidia is currently partially incompatible with linux >= 5.9 [1] [2]. While graphics should work fine, CUDA, OpenCL, and likely other features are broken. Users who've already upgraded and need those features are advised to switch to the linux-lts kernel for the time being until a fix for nvidia is available.

  • Radeon Linux Driver Seeing "MALL" Feature For Big Navi - Phoronix

    The AMDGPU open-source Linux kernel graphics driver continues seeing work on next-generation GPU support around the forthcoming "Big Navi" GPUs.

    Building off the Sienna Cichlid support that has come together and made its debut for Linux 5.9, and has further improvements for the now in-development Linux 5.10 kernel, new patches are now surfacing as material that will eventually make its way into Linux 5.11 for release as stable in early 2021.

    One of these late feature additions for Sienna Cichlid is the "MALL" display feature. MALL in this context is the Memory Access at Last Level. This Memory Access At Last Level is a DCN 3.0 feature for enhancing power savings with the screen contents coming from the "MALL" when certain conditions are met. At least at this point the support is only enabled for Sienna Cichlid and not other variants like Navy Flounder.

  • NIR-To-TGSI Support Added To Mesa 20.3 - Phoronix

    Mesa 20.3 has merged a long work-in-progress patch series providing support for going from the modern NIR intermediate representation to TGSI as the conventional Gallium3D IR.

    The NIR-To-TGSI translation layer has been in the works for most of the year with hopes of using that to eventually kill the Mesa state tracker GLSL-to-TGSI code that is quite large and crusty. While RadeonSI, Iris, and the other larger Gallium3D drivers are making use of NIR for a while now, this NIR-to-TGSI path can help other Gallium3D drivers like Softpipe that still rely on TGSI. If getting rid of the GLSL-to-TGSI path, GLSL shaders would ultimately go through NIR and then translated to TGSI.

Devices/Embedded Hardware, Mostly With Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

     

  • Dual-GbE mesh networking board features 802.11ax

    Wally’s “DR6000” mesh router board runs on Qualcomm’s quad -A53 IPQ6000 SoC with 2x GbE ports, dual-band concurrent 802.11ax (WiFi 6), and micro-USB and serial connections.

  • SDM-L signage system is first to taste Coffee Lake

    Aaeon’s “ASDM-L-CFS” SDM-L form-factor signage module runs on 8th or 9th Gen Core CPUs with up to 32GB DDR4, GbE, 2x USB 3.2, 2x M.2, HDMI 2.0 and DP 1.2, and an optional enclosure.

  • SwarmDrive is an ESP32 motor driver board for brushless motors (Crowdfunding)

    Netherlands based NickStick BV has developed a motor driver board powered by an ESP32 dual-core WiFI and Bluetooth module and capable of controlling brushless DC motors. 

  • ODROID-HC4 low-cost dual NAS comes with 4GB RAM, supports 2.5-inch and 3.5-inch SATA drives

    It’s hard to find low-cost NAS platforms often because of the mechanism to insert drives and the enclosure add to the cost. An alternative is to use boards like Hardkernel ODROID-HC1 for 2.5-inch drives or ODROID-HC2 for 2.5- and 3.5-inch drives, but each board supports only one drive. The designs are stackable, but you’d need one Linux board per drive, so it’s not ideal.

  • Odroid-HC4 toaster NAS runs dual PCIe-driven SATA drives

    Hardkernel is prepping an open-spec, $65 to $75 “Odroid-HC4” NAS device that runs Linux on a quad -A55 Amlogic S905X3 and offers dual PCIe-driven 2.5- or 3.5-inch slots for SSDs or HDDs plus HDMI 2.0 and 4GB DDR4.

  • Thinking About Creating A Raspberry Pi Replacement? | Hackaday

    If you’ve ever wanted to try your hand at creating a Raspberry Pi-like board for yourself, you should check out [Jay Carlson’s] review of 10 different Linux-capable SoCs. Back in the 1960s, a computer was multiple refrigerator-sized boxes with thousands of interconnections and building one from scratch was only a dream for most people. Then ICs came and put all the most important parts in a little relatively inexpensive IC package and homebrew computing became much more accessible. Systems on Chip (SoC) has carried that even further, making it easier than ever to create entire systems, like the Pi and its many competitors.

    Only a few years ago, making an SoC was still a big project because the vendors often didn’t want to release documentation to the public. In addition, most of the parts use ball grid array (BGA) packaging. BGA parts can be hard to work with, and require a multilayer PC board. Sure, you can’t plug these into a typical solderless breadboard. But working with these relatively large BGAs isn’t that hard and multilayer boards are now comparatively cheap. [Jay] reports that he got cheap PCBs and used a hot plate to build each board, and has some sage advice on how to do it.

Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, Terminal Software and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • From The Factory Floor | LINUX Unplugged 376

    We put the new Ubuntu 20.10 to the test, and chat with System76's Mechanical Engineer to get the secrets of the new Thelio Mega.

    Plus some important community news, feedback, picks, and more.

  • The COOLEST Linux Terminal App I've Ever Seen! - YouTube

    Say hello to a stunning, futuristic, Tron-inspired Terminal app for Linux, Windows and macOS that'll bring to life those hacker fantasies you had in the late 90s and early 2000s. It's also a fully functional system and resource monitor! 

  • There Are Too Many "Real Life" Script Kiddies - YouTube

    Just another boomer rant about some of the people that annoy me in real life and on the interwebs. I'm talking about the "script kiddies". And not just about programming "script kiddies" but people that are "script kiddies" in all aspects of life. 

  • Fd: Stop Using The Find Command And Try This - YouTube

    The find command on linux is great and all but it's quite slow, especially when searching over large directories like your home, but luckily there's better and faster alternatives that exist like fd which is written in rust and is the topic of today's video.

RISC-V: France, SiFive, CloudBEAR

Filed under
Hardware

  • Codasip Announces a New Design Center in France

    Codasip, the leading supplier of customizable RISC-V embedded processor IP, announced its new strategic design center today. It is based in France and the local Codasip team is going to play an important role in the company’s innovation and development plans for the next-generation product IP.

    The new Codasip French Design Center started operation in the summer. It is located in Villeneuve Loubet on the Mediterranean coastline in southeast France, near the technology park of Sophia Antipolis where major technology companies such as Bosch, NXP, Thales, and many others have offices.

    “As we are expanding the product portfolio and fostering our technology leadership, we need talented senior engineers to support the growth,” explained Karel Masařík, CEO of Codasip. “Sophia Antipolis is an important European location for R&D and technical talent in the semiconductor industry. We are proud to have hired our French colleagues there, close to customers. Their expertise will be a great supplement to that of our main R&D Center in the Czech Republic.”

  • Codasip opens RISC-V design centre in France

    Codasip's French design centre outside Sophia-Antipolis will focus on the architecture and verification of RISC-V cores
    German RISC-V core designer Codasip has opened a strategic design centre in France for its processor cores based on teh open source RISC_V instruction set architecture (ISA).

    The centre in Villeneuve Loubet is near Sophia Antipolis where major technology companies such as Bosch, NXP, Thales, and many others have offices.

  •                 

  • CloudBEAR BM-310 RISC-V MCU core for IoT applications

    In the pool of 32-bit RISC-V microcontroller cores (E20 by SiFive, VEGA ET1031 by C-DAC), CloudBEAR showcased its 32-bit small and efficient MCU core – BM-310 at RISC-V GLOBAL FORUM 2020. CloudBEAR works on providing services like processor IP customization, support for RISC-V ISA extensions, product integration within a system-on-chip, and configurable instruction and data cache.

    Let’s first look into the CloudBEAR processor IP portfolio. It has three different product lines- BM series, BR series, and BI series. First, the BM series targets small and efficient MCUs cores. Second, the BR series targets fast and compact embedded cores. The third and most important BI series is about Linux capable application cores. In this article, we will look into the details of BM-310, which is the RISC-V MCU core for embedded and IoT solutions. 

VirtualBox 6.1.16 Released with Full Support for Linux Kernel 5.9, Various Improvements

Filed under
Software

The biggest news in VirtualBox 6.1.16 is the implementation of support for the latest and greatest Linux 5.9 kernel series. This support is offered for both Linux hosts and guests, which means that you’ll now be able to install VirtualBox on distributions powered by Linux 5.9, as well as to run distros that use Linux 5.9 as virtual machines.

But wait, there are even more Linux improvements in VirtualBox 6.1.16. For example, this release comes with a workaround to improve the resizing of 32-bit virtual machines that use the VMSVGA graphics controller while avoiding the use of RandR 1.3 due to bugs causing hangs with the X server, as well as VMSVGA 3D support for Linux guests when using the Hyper-V hypervisor.

Read more

Kernel: Xen, XanMod and XFS

Filed under
Linux

  • Linux 5.10 Xen Brings Security Updates - Includes Fixing ARM Guests With KPTI - Phoronix

    The Xen virtualization work for the Linux 5.10 kernel revolves around security. 

    Last week brought the initial Xen updates for the Linux 5.10 merge window which primarily consisted of fixes. The main change to point out though was a temporary fix for allowing Xen guests on ARM to work with Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) enabled. A more long-term fix is still being worked on for Xen support in KPTI-enabled ARM environments. 

    The fix is around the VCPUOP_register_runstate_memory_area hypercall that under KPTI-protected guests would be passed an invalid virtual address, so the short term solution is to just avoid that call. ARM relies on Kernel Page Table Isolation as part of their mitigation against the Meltdown vulnerability on affected ARM Cortex processors, similar to the more well known usage on Intel processors. 

  • XanMod Linux Kernel

    There is a new tool available for Sparkers: XanMod Linux Kernel Installer

    What is XanMod Linux Kernel?

    XanMod is a general-purpose Linux kernel distribution with custom settings and new features. Built to provide a stable, responsive and smooth desktop experience.
    The real-time version is recommended for critical runtime applications such as Linux gaming eSports, streaming, live productions and ultra-low latency enthusiasts.
    Supports all recent 64-bit versions of Debian and Ubuntu-based systems.

    [...]

    – GPLv2 license. Can be built for any distribution or purpose.

  •   

  • XFS Lands More Code For Linux 5.10 - "Even More Monumental" - Phoronix

    Last week saw the XFS file-system with Linux 5.10 support timestamps until the year 2486 rather than year 2038 and other improvements too. This week a second round of XFS work has landed for Linux 5.10. 

    XFS maintainer Darrick Wong describes this week's file-system changes as "even more monumental than last week!" 

    XFS developers are announcing that in the Year 2030 they intend to deprecate their Version Four (V4) file-system format -- thus users have a decade to upgrade to the newer V5 format. Making use of the newer on-disk format means better metadata validation, support reflink and online fsck, and this support for timestamp handling beyond the year 2038. 

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5 open source tools I can't live without

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today's leftovers

  • A Quick Look At Ubuntu 20.04 LTS vs. 20.10 With The Core i9 10900K - Phoronix

    With Ubuntu 20.10 due for release this week I have begun testing near-final Ubuntu 20.10 builds on many more systems in the lab. Larger than our normal distribution/OS comparisons, here is the culmination of running hundreds of benchmarks (366 tests to be exact) under both Ubuntu 20.04 LTS with all available updates and then again on the Ubuntu 20.10 development state while testing on Intel Comet Lake. Aside from specific improvements for bleeding-edge hardware like Intel Tiger Lake performing better on Ubuntu 20.10 or when looking at cases like the Intel and Radeon graphics performance being better on Ubuntu 20.10 due to the newer Linux kernel and Mesa, for general CPU/system workloads the performance has largely been found to be similar to that of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. The other caveat is for workloads being built from source, Ubuntu 20.10 now ships with GCC 10 rather than GCC 9. GCC 10 doesn't normally yield any night-and-day differences in performance but in some cases for newer CPU microarchitectures there has been some improvements there or with features like LTO.

  • TSDgeos' blog: Make sure KDE software is usable in your language, join KDE translations!

    Translations are a vital part of software. More technical people often overlook it because they understand English well enough to use the software untranslated, but only 15% of the World understands English, so it's clear we need good translations to make our software more useful to the rest of the world. Translations are a place that [almost] always needs help, so I would encourage you to me (aacid@kde.org) if you are interested in helping. Sadly, some of our teams are not very active, so you may find yourself alone, it can be a bit daunting at the beginning, but the rest of us in kde-i18n-doc will help you along the way :)

  • News – WordPress 5.6 Beta 1 – WordPress.org

    WordPress 5.6 Beta 1 is now available for testing! This software is still in development, so we recommend that you run this version on a test site. [...] The current target for final release is December 8, 2020. This is just seven weeks away, so your help is needed to ensure this release is tested properly.

  • Google Patches Bug Used in Active Attacks Against Chrome

    Google has discovered and patched a serious vulnerability in Chrome that attackers are actively exploiting at the moment. The bug is a high-severity heap buffer overflow in FreeType, a free font-rendering engine that Chrome, among many other projects, uses. A member of Google’s Project Zero vulnerability research team discovered the vulnerability and subsequently found that attackers were already exploiting it. Google patched the flaw in Chrome 86.0.4240.111 for desktop browsers and the maintainers of the FreeType Project pushed out an emergency release of the library to fix it, as well. “I've just fixed a heap buffer overflow that can happen for some malformed .ttf files with PNG sbit glyphs. It seems that this vulnerability gets already actively used in the wild, so I ask all users to apply the corresponding commit as soon as possible,” Werner Lemberg, one of the original authors of the FreeType, said in an email to the FreeType announcement mailing list.

  • FreeType 2.10.4 Rushed Out As Emergency Security Release

    The FreeType text rendering library is out with version 2.10.4 today as an important security update.

  • Intel: replace thermal compound “every few years”

    Thermal compound (sometimes called thermal paste or grease) is applied to fill minuscule gaps in the materials in the heat spreader (the metal covering on top of the processor) and the heatsink. Eliminating these gaps is essential to ensuring efficient heat transfer into the heatsink. The thermal compound that is used in your computer generally won’t go bad or degrade in its useful lifespan. It will get displaced over time, however. You’d need higher temperatures than what you’ll typically find in a computer for other failure modes to come into effect. The displacement is caused by thermal cycling that results in an effect known as “thermally induced pump-out.” As the components heat up and cool down, the processors’ heat spreader (its metal top) and the heatsink will expand and contract. This effect will, over time, pump the thermal compound out from in between the two metal plates. You can find illustrations and a more technical explanation in the source links below.