Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 06 Jul 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

Mozilla: Rustup 1.22.0, Servo and Performance Improvements via Formally-Verified Cryptography in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF
    • Announcing Rustup 1.22.0

      The rustup working group is happy to announce the release of rustup version 1.22.0. Rustup is the recommended tool to install Rust, a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

    • This Week In Servo 131

      Welcome back everyone - it’s been a year without written updates, but we’re getting this train back on track! Servo hasn’t been dormant in that time; the biggest news was the public release of Firefox Reality (built on Servo technology) in the Microsoft store.

      In the past week, we merged 44 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

    • Performance Improvements via Formally-Verified Cryptography in Firefox

      Cryptographic primitives, while extremely complex and difficult to implement, audit, and validate, are critical for security on the web. To ensure that NSS (Network Security Services, the cryptography library behind Firefox) abides by Mozilla’s principle of user security being fundamental, we’ve been working with Project Everest and the HACL* team to bring formally-verified cryptography into Firefox.

      In Firefox 57, we introduced formally-verified Curve25519, which is a mechanism used for key establishment in TLS and other protocols. In Firefox 60, we added ChaCha20 and Poly1305, providing high-assurance authenticated encryption. Firefox 69, 77, and 79 improve and expand these implementations, providing increased performance while retaining the assurance granted by formal verification.

Stable Clonezilla live 2.6.7-28 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This release of Clonezilla live (2.6.7-28) includes major enhancements and bug fixes.

ENHANCEMENTS and CHANGES from 2.6.6-15

  • The underlying GNU/Linux operating system was upgraded. This release is based on the Debian Sid repository (as of 2020/Jun/30).
  • Linux kernel was updated to 5.7.6-1.
  • ocs-iso, ocs-live-dev: sync syslinux-related files when copying syslinux exec files.
  • When creating recovery iso/zip file, if it's in Clonezilla live environment, we have those syslinux files. Use that first so the version mismatch can be avoided. Ref: https://sourceforge.net/p/clonezilla/support-requests/127/
  • Move grub-header.cfg from bootx64.efi to grub.cfg so that it's more flexible.
  • To avoid conflict with the patch of grub in CentOS/Fedora, for GRUB EFI NB MAC/IP config style, the netboot file is now like grub.cfg-drbl-00:50:56:01:01:01 and grub.cfg-drbl-192.168.177.2 not grub.cfg-01-* anymore.
  • Add xen-tools
  • Partclone was updated to 0.3.14. The codes about xfs was updated to be 4.20.0.
  • Package exfat-fuse was removed since the kernel has module for that.
  • A better mechanism to deal with linuxefi/initrdefi or linux/initrd in the grub config was added.
  • Read more

Pico-ITX board based on i.MX8M ships with Linux BSP

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

F&S has launched a $407 and up “armStone MX8M” Pico-ITX SBC that runs Linux on an i.MX8M with up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC with GbE, WiFi/BT, 5x USB, MIPI-CSI, DVI, and a mini-PCIe slot.

F&S Elektronik Systeme originally announced the NXP i.MX8M-based armStone MX8M Pico-ITX board in early 2018 with an intention to begin sampling in Q2 of that year. The i.MX8M-based SBC has finally arrived, selling for 360 Euros ($407) in a kit that includes cables, a Yocto/Buildroot BSP, and full access to documentation.

The key new addition since the 2018 announcement is a mini-PCIe slot and SIM card slot. Instead of supplying 4x USB 2.0 host ports, you get 2x USB 3.0 and 2x USB 2.0, and the micro-USB OTG port has been updated from 2.0 to 3.0.

Read more

Programming: Rust, Perl, Compilers, IBM/Red Hat and More

Filed under
Development
  • GStreamer Rust bindings 0.16.0 release

    A new version of the GStreamer Rust bindings, 0.16.0, was released.

    As usual this release follows the latest gtk-rs release.

    This is the first version that includes optional support for new GStreamer 1.18 APIs. As GStreamer 1.18 was not released yet, these new APIs might still change. The minimum supported version of the bindings is still GStreamer 1.8 and the targetted GStreamer API version can be selected by applications via feature flags.

    Apart from this, new version features mostly features API cleanup and the addition of a few missing APIs. The focus of this release was to make usage of GStreamer from Rust as convenient and complete as possible.

  • Set up Vim as your Rust IDE

    Text editors and integrated development environment (IDE) tools make writing Rust code easier and quicker. There are many editors to choose from, but I believe the Vim editor is a great fit for a Rust IDE. In this article, I'll explain how to set up Vim for Rust application development.

  • It was bound to happen.

    While I don't actually work in Perl these days, and not by choice, I still keep an eye on the community. The language is chugging along nicely. Perl 6 is out, so at least that joke has died down, features are being added, some beneficiary, some not. All is well in perland.

    Then the news dropped. Perl 7. I was very interested. More so when I realised that it was a rebranding of the latest Perl. First, let me say one thing right off the bat. It's a good call. I'm all for it. In fact, I'm so all for it that I called for it in a post from 2011. At the time I suggested using codenames like Apple and others do, or to rebrand Perl 5.14 (at the time) as Perl 14 like Java did.

    Here's why I thought, and still do, that this "rebranding" is a Good Thing:

    It bypass the whole perl5/per6 story. With perl 6 not being perl anymore and Perl 5.32 being rebranded Perl 7 the community will be able to finally move past this whole deal.

  • When a deleted master device file only takes 20 mins out of your maintenance window, but a whole year off your lifespan

    Out of ideas, Jim decided to crash (rather than halt) the system by typing the BREAK sequence at the console. The server would not get the chance to close the file cleanly...

    "We said a small prayer, crossed our fingers, booted the server, and waited for the file system check (fsck) to repair the damage we had done," he recalled.

    "I've never typed the letter 'y' more carefully than when asked if we wanted to re-link orphaned inodes."

    With an elevated heart rate, Jim logged in and checked the file system's lost+found directory.

  • LLVMpipe Now Exposes OpenGL 4.2 For GL On CPUs

    It was just a few days ago that the LLVMpipe OpenGL software rasterizer within Mesa finally achieved OpenGL 4.0 support while today it has crossed both OpenGL 4.1 and 4.2 milestones.

    Thanks to much of GL 4.1 and GL 4.2 support for this Gallium3D software driver already being in place, it didn't take too much work to get it over the latest hurdles.

  • GCC Compiler Support Posted For Intel AMX

    Building upon Intel working on GNU toolchain support for AMX, the newly-detailed Advanced Matrix Extensions being introduced next year with "Sapphire Rapids" Xeon CPUs, the GCC compiler support has been sent out in patch form.

    On top of the GNU bits that began at the end of June following Intel publishing documentation on AMX, AMX started landing in LLVM too a few days ago. The latest is AMX enablement for the GNU Compiler Collection sent out overnight.

  • 9 open source test-automation frameworks

    A test-automation framework is a set of best practices, common tools, and libraries that help quality-assurance testers assess the functionality, security, usability, and accessibility of multiple web and mobile applications. In a "quick-click" digital world, we're accustomed to fulfilling our needs in a jiffy. This is one reason why the software market is flooded with hundreds of test-automation frameworks.

    Although teams could build elaborate automated testing frameworks, there's usually little reason to spend the money, resources, and person-hours to do so when they can achieve equal or even better results with existing open source tools, libraries, and testing frameworks.

  • Profile-guided optimization in Clang: Dealing with modified sources

    Profile-guided optimization (PGO) is a now-common compiler technique for improving the compilation process. In PGO (sometimes pronounced “pogo”), an administrator uses the first version of the binary to collect a profile, through instrumentation or sampling, then uses that information to guide the compilation process.

    Profile-guided optimization can help developers make better decisions, for instance, concerning inlining or block ordering. In some cases, it can also lead to using obsolete profile information to guide compilation. For reasons that I will explain, this feature can benefit large projects. It also puts the burden on the compiler implementation to detect and handle inconsistencies.

    This article focuses on how the Clang compiler implements PGO, and specifically, how it instruments binaries. We will look at what happens when Clang instruments source code during the compilation step to collect profile information during execution. Then, I’ll introduce a real-world bug that demonstrates the pitfalls of the current approach to PGO.

    [...]

    Clang and GCC both support using obsolete profile information to guide the compilation process. If a function body changes, obsolete information is ignored. This feature can be beneficial for large projects, where gathering profile information is costly. This puts an extra burden on the compiler implementation to detect and handle inconsistencies, which also increases the likelihood of a compiler bug.

  • Earn a Red Hat containers certification online

    Lockdowns and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 have meant limited access to testing centers for most certification programs in much of the world. We recently announced that remote exams would be an option in the near future for taking some Red Hat certification exams. In the meantime, many organizations are using the current situation as an opportunity for their teams to learn and build new skills in support of containers and Kubernetes. The need to provide the hands-on validation of these skills provided by Red Hat Certification has never been greater.

    In order to address these limitations and needs, and to help organizations and IT professionals pursue the opportunities offered by these technologies, Red Hat is offering a new certification, Red Hat Certified Specialist in Containers for Kubernetes to people who pass the Preliminary Exam in Containers, Kubernetes, and Openshift (PE180).

    This certification will be given to those who have already taken the exam since it was launched in late 2019 as well as those who pass it going forward. This affordable certification offers IT professionals a remote option to strengthen their Kubernetes skills and embrace a DevOps mindset.

  • Official Gentoo Docker images

    Did you already know that we have official Gentoo Docker images available on Docker Hub?! The most popular one is based on the amd64 stage. Images are created automatically; you can peek at the source code for this on our git server. Thanks to the Gentoo Docker project!

  • Grupo Condis Embraces the Hybrid Cloud with Red Hat OpenShift

    Red Hat, Inc, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that Grupo Condis has adopted Red Hat OpenShift, the industry’s most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform, as part of its digital transformation strategy. Building on the back of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform in Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat OpenShift helps Condis respond to market needs faster, build greater customer loyalty and create more innovative services without sacrificing the stability of critical operations.

Meet the GNOMEies: Kristi Progri

Filed under
GNOME

What is your role within the GNOME community?

I am the Program Coordinator in the GNOME Foundation where I help to organize various events, leading many initiatives within the community including the Engagement Team, and working closely with all the volunteers and contributors. I also coordinate internships and help with general Foundation activities.

Do you have any other affiliations you want to share?

Before joining GNOME, I was very active in Mozilla community. I have been part of the Tech Speakers program and a Mozilla Representative for more than seven years now. I have organized many events and workshops and also have participated as a speaker talking about Free Software communities at many events around the globe.

Why did you get involved in GNOME?

I was introduced to Free Software when I was in high school, my friend had a computer running Debian and he started explaining how it worked. This was the first time I heard about it and I immediately understood that I would never be part of these communities. It looked so complicated and not my cup of tea, but it looks like I was very wrong. Once I went for to a hackerspace meeting I completely changed my mind and from that moment the hackerspace become my second home.

Read more

Mozilla, the Web, and Standards

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Firefox UX: UX Book Club Recap: Writing is Designing, in Conversation with the Authors

    Beyond the language that appears in our products, Michael encouraged the group to educate themselves, follow Black writers and designers, and be open and willing to change. Any effective UX practitioner needs to approach their work with a sense of humility and openness to being wrong.

    Supporting racial justice and the Black Lives Matter movement must also include raising long-needed conversations in the workplace, asking tough questions, and sitting with discomfort. Michael recommended reading How To Be An Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi and So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo.

    [...]

    In the grand scheme of tech things, UX writing is still a relatively new discipline. Books like Writing for Designing are helping to define and shape the practice.

    When asked (at another meet-up, not our own) if he’s advocating for a ‘content-first approach,’ Michael’s response was that we need an ‘everything first approach’ — meaning, all parties involved in the design and development of a product should come to the planning table together, early on in the process. By making the case for writing as a strategic design practice, this book helps solidify a spot at that table for UX writers.

  • Tantek Çelik: Changes To IndieWeb Organizing, Brief Words At IndieWebCamp West

    A week ago Saturday morning co-organizer Chris Aldrich opened IndieWebCamp West and introduced the keynote speakers. After their inspiring talks he asked me to say a few words about changes we’re making in the IndieWeb community around organizing. This is an edited version of those words, rewritten for clarity and context. — Tantek

  • H.266/VVC Standard Finalized With ~50% Lower Size Compared To H.265

    The Versatile Video Coding (VVC) standard is now firmed up as H.266 as the successor to H.265/HEVC.

    H.266/VVC has been in the works for several years by a multitude of organizations. The schedule had been aiming for finalizing the standard by July 2020.

  • DSA Is Past Its Prime

    DSA is not only broken from an engineering point of view, though, it’s also cryptographically weak as deployed. The strength of an N-bit DSA key is approximately the same as that of an N-bit RSA key4, and modern cryptography has painstakingly moved away from 1024-bit RSA keys years ago considering them too weak. Academics computed a discrete logarithm modulo a 795-bit prime last year. NIST 800-57 recommends lengths of 2048 for keys with security lifetimes extending beyond 2010. The LogJam attack authors estimated the cost of breaking a 1024-bit DLP to be within reach of nation-states in 2015.5 And yet, DSA with keys larger than 1024 bits is not really a thing!

  • Email Isn’t Broken, Email Clients Are!

    You wouldn’t say “the Web” is broken (or HTTP for those reading who happen to be technologists). Actually some of you (of the HTTPS all-the-things variety) might but that’s beside the point. The real problem with email is managing the massive volume received in a way that’s relatively sane. You can’t fix this problem at the protocol level, it’s an application-level problem. The only real solution to dealing with massive amounts of email is automation (maybe even massive amounts of it). The uninitiated might be shocked to realize how much preprocessing their email messages undergo before they make it to the inbox, researching spam filtering is a great way to get a glimpse into what’s happening, but it’s not enough because it’s not personalized in a way that’s truly effective for the end-user.

Security: Free Software Patches, Proprietary Software 'Patches', FUD and Proprietary Software Gone Rogue

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (chromium, php7.0, and thunderbird), Fedora (ceph, gssdp, gupnp, libfilezilla, libldb, mediawiki, python-pillow, python36, samba, and xpdf), Mageia (curl, docker, firefox, libexif, libupnp, libvncserver, libxml2, mailman, ntp, perl-YAML, python-httplib2, tcpreplay, tomcat, and vlc), openSUSE (chocolate-doom, python3, and Virtualbox), Slackware (libvorbis), and SUSE (mozilla-nspr, mozilla-nss, systemd, tomcat, and zstd).

  • macOS Security Failure - Apple's 'fix' doesn't work

    Security vulnerability means standard accounts can read all files on the Mac hard drive - and Apple's 'fix' didn't fix it

  • Home router warning: They're riddled with known flaws and run ancient, unpatched Linux [Ed: Right now ZDNet blames "Linux" for people not keeping routers up to date. This is typical CBS tabloid practice.]
  • Wladimir Palant: Dismantling BullGuard Antivirus' online protection

    Just like so many other antivirus applications, BullGuard antivirus promises to protect you online. This protection consists of the three classic components: protection against malicious websites, marking of malicious search results and BullGuard Secure Browser for your special web surfing needs. As so often, this functionality comes with issues of its own, some being unusually obvious.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development

Linux-ready Coffee Lake systems support Nvidia graphics

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Neousys’ “Nuvo-8240GC” embedded PC runs on 8th or 9th Gen CPUs with 2x PCIe x16 for dual Tesla T4 GPUs and offers 2x PCIe x8, M.2 for NVMe, and 2x mini-PCIe. A similar Nuvo-8108GC system was tapped by Baidu as a dev kit for its Linux-based Apollo automotive platform.

Neousys announced a rugged, Intel Coffee Lake embedded computer that supports two 70W Nvidia Tesla T4 cards for AI inference. The Nuvo-8240GC supports applications such as medical imaging, intelligent video analytics, traffic management, and machine vision.

Neousys recently announced that its similar Nuvo-8108GC system was selected by Baidu as a development kit for its open source, Linux-driven Apollo autonomous driving platform. Announced last November, the Nuvo-8108GC supports a single 250W Nvidia graphics card. Farther below we briefly summarize the Baidu news and the Nuvo-8108GC, which like the new Nuvo-8240GC, supports Linux or Windows.

Read more

24 Excellent KDE Plasma Widgets (Updated 2020)

Filed under
KDE

After desktop hopping for many years, I’m fairly settled on KDE Plasma 5. It’s a lightweight (yes these days it really is lightweight) and responsive desktop which is full-featured and beguiling to the eye. In my opinion, one of the aspects that stands KDE Plasma head and shoulders above its desktop peers is extensibility. Plasma lets you configure the desktop to your specific preferences.

KDE Plasma widgets (also known as plasmoids) are a smart way of customizing the desktop. There’s an abundance of widgets available that act like building blocks, constructing a desktop that’s perfect for your needs and requirements. I’ve tried the vast majority of KDE Plasma widgets.

Read more

Also: Week #5 Status Report [Preset Editor MyPaint Engine]

Zenwalk Linux Review

Filed under
Reviews

Zenwalk Linux surprise me from the very first moment with this new release. They have done a really great work at all levels: a pretty, nice, polished, and well worked XFCE desktop that works in low resources hardware, and preinstalled localization for support non US languages. As I said previously, it’s a good move to include Flatpak support since installation, because all users can access to a lot of software easily. By the way, I need to mention that Zenwalk uses Lilo and eLilo (for MBR and UEFI systems, respectively) instead of grub2. This is not a bad thing, but it’s not a standard on these days. Both Lilo and eLilo do their work perfectly, so there’s no problem with that.

Read more

Avidemux 2.7.6 Free Video Editor Released with New AV1 Decoder, Many Changes

Filed under
Software
Movies

Avidemux, the free, open-source and multi-platform video editor used for cutting, filtering and encoding videos has a new major release, Avidemux 2.7.6, which comes about 10 months after the previous release, so you can imagine that it packs quite some changes.

First, the big ones. Avidemux gained an AV1 decoder based on the libaom library, as well as VP9 encoder based on the libvpx library, and support for FFmpeg 4.2.3. Only for Linux, it now features a hardware accelerated deinterlacer and resizer based on the Video Acceleration API (VA-API).

Also new in this release is the ability to detect cut points in HEVC video streams that could result in grave playback issues and warn the user about it, as well as the fact that the maximum supported video resolution was bumped to 4096×4096.

Furthermore, a 2-pass mode and extended configuration options were added to the NVENC-based H.264 and HEVC encoders, HE-AAC and HE-AACv2 profiles were added to the FDK AAC encoder plugin, and support for OGG Vorbis and LPCM audio was added to the MP4 muxer.

Avidemux now supports external audio tracks in DTS format and MPEG-TS files with duration in excess of 13:15:36, uses DTS core from DTS XLL audio in MPEG-TS files instead of rejecting the track, and correctly detects mono MP3 audio tracks in MP4 files.

Read more

Also: LMMS 1.2.2 Released! How to Install in Ubuntu 20.04

LibreOffice 7.0 RC1 is available for testing

Filed under
LibO

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 7.0 RC1 is available for testing!

LibreOffice 7.0 will be released as final at the beginning of August, 2020 ( Check the Release Plan for more information ) being LibreOffice 7.0 RC1 the forth pre-release since the development of version 7.0 started in the beginning of June, 2019. Since the previous release, LibreOffice 7.0 Beta2, 174 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 116 bugs have been fixed. Check the release notes to find the new features included in LibreOffice 7.0.

LibreOffice 7.0 RC1 can be downloaded from here for Linux, MacOS and Windows.

In case you find any problem in this pre-release, please report it in Bugzilla ( You just need a legit email account in order to create a new account ).

Read more

Games: Drox Operative 2, The Wizard: WizHarder Edition, Lutris, TF2 and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Starship action RPG 'Drox Operative 2' arrives on GOG

    The currently in development space action RPG Drox Operative 2 can now be picked up DRM-free on GOG. If you enjoy 2D space exploration, plenty of combat, dealing with warring races and a bunch of RPG-styled progression mechanics then Drox Operative 2 might be a good pick for you.

    Soldak Entertainment were kind enough to provide us with an Early Access key, so we will be taking a look when it gets a bit further along. So far though, it does seem like a promising step up from the original with graphical improvements, smoother combat and more enhancements that currently feels like a remaster of the first rather than a huge sequel.

  • Dungeon exploring puzzler 'The Wizard: WizHarder Edition' announced

    The Wizard: WizHarder Edition was announced recently, as an expanded and upgraded edition of the very popular free web game that's been going for 6 years now.

    Initially starting as a small experiment written in HTML5/JavaScript, it eventually grew into a full game with an extensive campaign, high-quality soundtrack, and delightful 16-bit visuals. To this day, Hypnotic Owl say it's gained "over half a million players" and considering the very warm reception to the web-game with players "demanding more", they've decided to remake it for desktop players with The Wizard: WizHarder Edition.

  • FOSS Linux game launcher 'Lutris' has a new bug-fix release out

    It's free, it's open source and it helps you manage your thousand+ game library, a fresh update of the game launcher Lutris has arrived.

    Not a game store but a launcher. Letting you add games from GOG, Humble, Steam and more along with compatibility layers like Wine/Proton and emulators too. It's an all-in-one solution for gaming on Linux. It's also seen plenty of recognition with even Epic Games granting them a small sum. Lutris can make managing things like Origin or Battle.Net on Linux with Wine a much smoother experience, thanks to people writing various scripts to automate everything they need to be setup nicely.

  • Valve silences the bots in Team Fortress 2, TF2 Classic Mod out now

    Valve silences the bots in Team Fortress 2, TF2 Classic Mod out now
    Team Fortress 2 continues to have a bot problem but Valve are actually fighting back and the latest update takes another blunt approach to dealing with them.

    After a few updates recently aimed at bots, Valve took away a few features from newer accounts like text chat, taking away name changing during games, new in-game options for players to actually turn off text and voice chat and so on. A few days ago another update released that removes all types of voice chat from accounts that cannot use text chat.

    It's a very blunt and harsh approach, that has also limited voice commands for newer accounts, presumably to also stop voice commands like calling for a medic from being spammed into games. The knock-on effect is that legitimate players won't be able to use any of these systems either, until they get a TF2 Premium account status by buying something so it's become a free to play game that heavily reduces what people can actually do until they pay something. It's a shame but hopefully Valve will come up with a better solution eventually.

  • Charge Kid, a new open source platformer where each jump is a puzzle

    Up for some more open source gaming fun? Charge Kid, released on June 30 is a platformer that makes you think about your jumps and turns every single one into a puzzle.

    Mechanically and artistically simple but what it does with it is pretty great. You have to be clever, making great use of the limit abilities it gives you to reach across each level to progress onto the next. Instead of needing super-precision with your platforming, you need to solve the jumping puzzle on how to reach each section. It's definitely challenging.

Debian: Radio in the Terminal and Thorsten Alteholz's Debian Activities in June 2020

Filed under
Debian

Zettlr Markdown Editor 1.7 Adds Vim And Emacs Input Modes, Tabs Support, Faster Startup Time

Filed under
Software

Zettlr, a free and open source Markdown editor for personal knowledge management and publishing, had a new release recently (1.7.0, followed by 1.7.1 to fix some issues) which adds Vim and Emacs input modes, tabs support, and faster application startup time thanks to caching, along with many other improvements.

Read more

How to access Samsung DeX mode on Linux and Chrome OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Google has yet to offer a full-fledged desktop interface in Android, but you can access the hidden barebones version of it on some devices running Android 10. A handful of OEMs, on the other hand, offer their own implementations of the desktop mode, and Samsung’s DeX is inarguably the most polished and feature-rich option among them. The latest version of Samsung DeX can even seamlessly integrate itself with Macs and Windows PCs.

While Samsung did backport DeX for PC support to older flagships, they still don’t provide an official Linux (and Chrome OS) companion app corresponding to this handy feature. From the perspective of a regular Samsung user who uses Linux, it means that you could only access the DeX mode if you had an external display. There is no OS level limitation per se, so XDA Senior Member KMyers has decided to create a proof-of-concept technique that ultimately works as a Linux client for Samsung DeX.

[...]

Typical features like clipboard sharing and drag-and-drop installation of APK files are working without issue in this method, but sound routing is a bit messy. You might have to compile scrcpy from source, though, because the available build on the default package repository of Debian based operating systems (e.g., Ubuntu and the Crostini environment on Chrome OS) is usually outdated. This step can be particularly problematic on ARM-powered Chrome OS devices, so opt for cross-compiling instead.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Pico-ITX board based on i.MX8M ships with Linux BSP

F&S has launched a $407 and up “armStone MX8M” Pico-ITX SBC that runs Linux on an i.MX8M with up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC with GbE, WiFi/BT, 5x USB, MIPI-CSI, DVI, and a mini-PCIe slot. F&S Elektronik Systeme originally announced the NXP i.MX8M-based armStone MX8M Pico-ITX board in early 2018 with an intention to begin sampling in Q2 of that year. The i.MX8M-based SBC has finally arrived, selling for 360 Euros ($407) in a kit that includes cables, a Yocto/Buildroot BSP, and full access to documentation. The key new addition since the 2018 announcement is a mini-PCIe slot and SIM card slot. Instead of supplying 4x USB 2.0 host ports, you get 2x USB 3.0 and 2x USB 2.0, and the micro-USB OTG port has been updated from 2.0 to 3.0. Read more

Programming: Rust, Perl, Compilers, IBM/Red Hat and More

  • GStreamer Rust bindings 0.16.0 release

    A new version of the GStreamer Rust bindings, 0.16.0, was released. As usual this release follows the latest gtk-rs release. This is the first version that includes optional support for new GStreamer 1.18 APIs. As GStreamer 1.18 was not released yet, these new APIs might still change. The minimum supported version of the bindings is still GStreamer 1.8 and the targetted GStreamer API version can be selected by applications via feature flags. Apart from this, new version features mostly features API cleanup and the addition of a few missing APIs. The focus of this release was to make usage of GStreamer from Rust as convenient and complete as possible.

  • Set up Vim as your Rust IDE

    Text editors and integrated development environment (IDE) tools make writing Rust code easier and quicker. There are many editors to choose from, but I believe the Vim editor is a great fit for a Rust IDE. In this article, I'll explain how to set up Vim for Rust application development.

  • It was bound to happen.

    While I don't actually work in Perl these days, and not by choice, I still keep an eye on the community. The language is chugging along nicely. Perl 6 is out, so at least that joke has died down, features are being added, some beneficiary, some not. All is well in perland. Then the news dropped. Perl 7. I was very interested. More so when I realised that it was a rebranding of the latest Perl. First, let me say one thing right off the bat. It's a good call. I'm all for it. In fact, I'm so all for it that I called for it in a post from 2011. At the time I suggested using codenames like Apple and others do, or to rebrand Perl 5.14 (at the time) as Perl 14 like Java did. Here's why I thought, and still do, that this "rebranding" is a Good Thing: It bypass the whole perl5/per6 story. With perl 6 not being perl anymore and Perl 5.32 being rebranded Perl 7 the community will be able to finally move past this whole deal.

  • When a deleted master device file only takes 20 mins out of your maintenance window, but a whole year off your lifespan

    Out of ideas, Jim decided to crash (rather than halt) the system by typing the BREAK sequence at the console. The server would not get the chance to close the file cleanly... "We said a small prayer, crossed our fingers, booted the server, and waited for the file system check (fsck) to repair the damage we had done," he recalled. "I've never typed the letter 'y' more carefully than when asked if we wanted to re-link orphaned inodes." With an elevated heart rate, Jim logged in and checked the file system's lost+found directory.

  • LLVMpipe Now Exposes OpenGL 4.2 For GL On CPUs

    It was just a few days ago that the LLVMpipe OpenGL software rasterizer within Mesa finally achieved OpenGL 4.0 support while today it has crossed both OpenGL 4.1 and 4.2 milestones. Thanks to much of GL 4.1 and GL 4.2 support for this Gallium3D software driver already being in place, it didn't take too much work to get it over the latest hurdles.

  • GCC Compiler Support Posted For Intel AMX

    Building upon Intel working on GNU toolchain support for AMX, the newly-detailed Advanced Matrix Extensions being introduced next year with "Sapphire Rapids" Xeon CPUs, the GCC compiler support has been sent out in patch form. On top of the GNU bits that began at the end of June following Intel publishing documentation on AMX, AMX started landing in LLVM too a few days ago. The latest is AMX enablement for the GNU Compiler Collection sent out overnight.

  • 9 open source test-automation frameworks

    A test-automation framework is a set of best practices, common tools, and libraries that help quality-assurance testers assess the functionality, security, usability, and accessibility of multiple web and mobile applications. In a "quick-click" digital world, we're accustomed to fulfilling our needs in a jiffy. This is one reason why the software market is flooded with hundreds of test-automation frameworks. Although teams could build elaborate automated testing frameworks, there's usually little reason to spend the money, resources, and person-hours to do so when they can achieve equal or even better results with existing open source tools, libraries, and testing frameworks.

  • Profile-guided optimization in Clang: Dealing with modified sources

    Profile-guided optimization (PGO) is a now-common compiler technique for improving the compilation process. In PGO (sometimes pronounced “pogo”), an administrator uses the first version of the binary to collect a profile, through instrumentation or sampling, then uses that information to guide the compilation process. Profile-guided optimization can help developers make better decisions, for instance, concerning inlining or block ordering. In some cases, it can also lead to using obsolete profile information to guide compilation. For reasons that I will explain, this feature can benefit large projects. It also puts the burden on the compiler implementation to detect and handle inconsistencies. This article focuses on how the Clang compiler implements PGO, and specifically, how it instruments binaries. We will look at what happens when Clang instruments source code during the compilation step to collect profile information during execution. Then, I’ll introduce a real-world bug that demonstrates the pitfalls of the current approach to PGO. [...] Clang and GCC both support using obsolete profile information to guide the compilation process. If a function body changes, obsolete information is ignored. This feature can be beneficial for large projects, where gathering profile information is costly. This puts an extra burden on the compiler implementation to detect and handle inconsistencies, which also increases the likelihood of a compiler bug.

  • Earn a Red Hat containers certification online

    Lockdowns and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 have meant limited access to testing centers for most certification programs in much of the world. We recently announced that remote exams would be an option in the near future for taking some Red Hat certification exams. In the meantime, many organizations are using the current situation as an opportunity for their teams to learn and build new skills in support of containers and Kubernetes. The need to provide the hands-on validation of these skills provided by Red Hat Certification has never been greater. In order to address these limitations and needs, and to help organizations and IT professionals pursue the opportunities offered by these technologies, Red Hat is offering a new certification, Red Hat Certified Specialist in Containers for Kubernetes to people who pass the Preliminary Exam in Containers, Kubernetes, and Openshift (PE180). This certification will be given to those who have already taken the exam since it was launched in late 2019 as well as those who pass it going forward. This affordable certification offers IT professionals a remote option to strengthen their Kubernetes skills and embrace a DevOps mindset.

  • Official Gentoo Docker images

    Did you already know that we have official Gentoo Docker images available on Docker Hub?! The most popular one is based on the amd64 stage. Images are created automatically; you can peek at the source code for this on our git server. Thanks to the Gentoo Docker project!

  • Grupo Condis Embraces the Hybrid Cloud with Red Hat OpenShift

    Red Hat, Inc, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that Grupo Condis has adopted Red Hat OpenShift, the industry’s most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform, as part of its digital transformation strategy. Building on the back of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform in Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat OpenShift helps Condis respond to market needs faster, build greater customer loyalty and create more innovative services without sacrificing the stability of critical operations.

Meet the GNOMEies: Kristi Progri

What is your role within the GNOME community? I am the Program Coordinator in the GNOME Foundation where I help to organize various events, leading many initiatives within the community including the Engagement Team, and working closely with all the volunteers and contributors. I also coordinate internships and help with general Foundation activities. Do you have any other affiliations you want to share? Before joining GNOME, I was very active in Mozilla community. I have been part of the Tech Speakers program and a Mozilla Representative for more than seven years now. I have organized many events and workshops and also have participated as a speaker talking about Free Software communities at many events around the globe. Why did you get involved in GNOME? I was introduced to Free Software when I was in high school, my friend had a computer running Debian and he started explaining how it worked. This was the first time I heard about it and I immediately understood that I would never be part of these communities. It looked so complicated and not my cup of tea, but it looks like I was very wrong. Once I went for to a hackerspace meeting I completely changed my mind and from that moment the hackerspace become my second home. Read more

Mozilla, the Web, and Standards

  • Firefox UX: UX Book Club Recap: Writing is Designing, in Conversation with the Authors

    Beyond the language that appears in our products, Michael encouraged the group to educate themselves, follow Black writers and designers, and be open and willing to change. Any effective UX practitioner needs to approach their work with a sense of humility and openness to being wrong. Supporting racial justice and the Black Lives Matter movement must also include raising long-needed conversations in the workplace, asking tough questions, and sitting with discomfort. Michael recommended reading How To Be An Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi and So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo. [...] In the grand scheme of tech things, UX writing is still a relatively new discipline. Books like Writing for Designing are helping to define and shape the practice. When asked (at another meet-up, not our own) if he’s advocating for a ‘content-first approach,’ Michael’s response was that we need an ‘everything first approach’ — meaning, all parties involved in the design and development of a product should come to the planning table together, early on in the process. By making the case for writing as a strategic design practice, this book helps solidify a spot at that table for UX writers.

  • Tantek Çelik: Changes To IndieWeb Organizing, Brief Words At IndieWebCamp West

    A week ago Saturday morning co-organizer Chris Aldrich opened IndieWebCamp West and introduced the keynote speakers. After their inspiring talks he asked me to say a few words about changes we’re making in the IndieWeb community around organizing. This is an edited version of those words, rewritten for clarity and context. — Tantek

  • H.266/VVC Standard Finalized With ~50% Lower Size Compared To H.265

    The Versatile Video Coding (VVC) standard is now firmed up as H.266 as the successor to H.265/HEVC. H.266/VVC has been in the works for several years by a multitude of organizations. The schedule had been aiming for finalizing the standard by July 2020.

  • DSA Is Past Its Prime

    DSA is not only broken from an engineering point of view, though, it’s also cryptographically weak as deployed. The strength of an N-bit DSA key is approximately the same as that of an N-bit RSA key4, and modern cryptography has painstakingly moved away from 1024-bit RSA keys years ago considering them too weak. Academics computed a discrete logarithm modulo a 795-bit prime last year. NIST 800-57 recommends lengths of 2048 for keys with security lifetimes extending beyond 2010. The LogJam attack authors estimated the cost of breaking a 1024-bit DLP to be within reach of nation-states in 2015.5 And yet, DSA with keys larger than 1024 bits is not really a thing!

  • Email Isn’t Broken, Email Clients Are!

    You wouldn’t say “the Web” is broken (or HTTP for those reading who happen to be technologists). Actually some of you (of the HTTPS all-the-things variety) might but that’s beside the point. The real problem with email is managing the massive volume received in a way that’s relatively sane. You can’t fix this problem at the protocol level, it’s an application-level problem. The only real solution to dealing with massive amounts of email is automation (maybe even massive amounts of it). The uninitiated might be shocked to realize how much preprocessing their email messages undergo before they make it to the inbox, researching spam filtering is a great way to get a glimpse into what’s happening, but it’s not enough because it’s not personalized in a way that’s truly effective for the end-user.