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Quick Roundup

Wine 5.2 release

The Wine development release 5.2 is now available. What's new in this release (see below for details): - More compatible codepage mapping tables. - Support for using the null display driver as a real driver. - Better UTF-8 support in the Resource and Message Compilers. - Fixes for using ucrtbase as C runtime. - Various bug fixes. The source is available from the following locations... Read more Also: Wine 5.2 With Better Handling For The Null Display Driver, UTF-8 Support The Wine 5.2 development release is out

Linux 5.6-rc2

More than halt the rc2 patch is actually Documentaiton updates,
because the kvm docs got turned into RST.

Another notable chunk is just tooling updates, which is about 50/50
perf updates (much of it due to header file syncing) and - again - kvm
updates.

But if you ignore those parts, and look at only the actual kernel code
updates, things look a bit calmer. The bulk ends up being network
driver updates (intel "ice" driver - E800 series - stands out) with
GPU updates a close second (i915, amd, panfrost). There's a few other
driver updates in there too, but they are mostly hidden in the noise
compared to the network and gpu subsystems: rdma, sound, acpi, block,
gpio etc.

Outside of drivers, there's the usual smattering of changes all over.
Filesystems (nfs, ext4, ceph, cifs, btrfs), architecture updates (x86,
arm), and some core code (scheduling, tracing, networking, io_uring).

The shortlog is appended, you can get a feel for the details by scanning it.

Go forth and test,

               Linus
Read more Also: Linux 5.6-rc2 Released - Led By Documentation + Tooling Updates

today's leftovers

  • This Week in Linux 93: MATE 1.24, KDE Plasma 5.18, Blender, OpenShot, Evernote, MX Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we have monster of a show with new releases from desktop environments like MATE and KDE Plasma to distro news from MX Linux, Ubuntu, Project Trident and Tiny Core. In App News this week, we see new releases from Blender, OpenShot and some interesting news from Evernote. We’ll also talk about some updates from TLP the laptop performance project and Wayland display server protocol. Later in the show, we’ll check out a cool gaming overlay project called MangoHud and we’ll discuss some Legal News related to Mycroft AI and their fight against a “Patent Troll”. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • How Ceph powers exciting research with Open Source

    As researchers seek scalable, high performance methods for storing data, Ceph is a powerful technology that needs to be at the top of their list. Ceph is an open-source software-defined storage platform. While it’s not often in the spotlight, it’s working hard behind the scenes, playing a crucial role in enabling ambitious, world-renowned projects such as CERN’s particle physics research, Immunity Bio’s cancer research, The Human Brain Project, MeerKat radio telescope, and more. These ventures are propelling the collective understanding of our planet and the human race beyond imaginable realms, and the outcomes will forever change how we perceive our existence and potential. It’s high-time Ceph receives the praise it deserves for powering some of the most exciting research projects on Earth.

  • Kubernetes' Inevitable Takeover of the Data Center
  • How To Drive Infrastructure Like Uber Does
  • DragonFlyBSD 5.8-RC1 Is Ready With Many Changes From DSynth To Performance Optimizations

    Not only did NetBSD 9.0 make its debut today but DragonFlyBSD 5.8 was branched and its first release candidate made while DragonFlyBSD 5.9 is the version now open on Git master.

  • Executive interview: Melissa Di Donato, CEO, SUSE

    New CEO of the world’s largest independent open source company wants to make SUSE more innovative and help businesses to modernise traditional IT

  • Every time Windows 10 Updates, it deletes all saved desktop icons, clears my taskbar, deletes all my saved favorites, passwords, and more!

    Every time my PC updates my desktop wallpaper goes back to default, and all saved icons, favorites, passwords, etc are gone. Every. Single. Time. This is getting tiring and I'm losing so much time at work saving my icons again, paswords, etc. What is going on? Also keeps changing my default printer even when the box is left un-checked, when the computer updates and restarts the box will be checked. Its almost as if the computer is set back to default after every update. Please help. I've tried quite a few things to fix and no luck.

  • February Win10 1903 and 1909 cumulative update, KB 4532693, causing desktops to disappear

    Microsoft should be paying you to beta test their buggy patches.

  • Windows 10: Update KB4532693 kills user data/profile

    There are reports that cumulative update KB4532693 for Windows 10 versions 1903 and 1909 dated February 11, 2020, is causing significant issues for some users. Desktop gone, files gone, icons gone and more.

  • Second Windows 10 update is now causing problems by hiding user profiles

    Windows 10 users are reporting that a second Windows update included in this month's Patch Tuesday is causing problems. According to reports, a bug in the KB4532693 update is hiding user profiles and their respective data on some Windows 10 systems.

Devices: Librem 5, USB, SB Servo, and Raspberry Pi/OSMC

  • Librem 5 Gyro and Ambient Light Sensor Progress

    The software stack around sensors is coming together piece by piece. It will take longer for features like auto-rotate to start working, but the raw data is there and ready to be used by PureOS and software developers.

  • USB armory Mk II: A secure computer on a USB stick featuring open source hardware design

    The hardware security professionals at F-Secure have created a new version of the USB armory – a computer on a USB stick built from the ground up to be secure.

  • SB Servo is a powerful open source digital serial servo motor

    SB Servo motors have been created to offer affordable, powerful and open-source digital servo motors with Torque, Speed, Position Feedback and full 360-degree rotation mode. Early bird pricing starts from £10 and deliveries are expected to start next month during March 2020.

  • OSMC Skin update

    While we usually release a single monthly update, we've made a number of improvements to the OSMC skin and would like to get these changes out as promptly as possible for feedback. [...] To get the latest and greatest version of OSMC, simply head to My OSMC -> Updater and check for updates manually on your exising OSMC set up. Of course — if you have updates scheduled automatically you should receive an update notification shortly. If you enjoy OSMC, please follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook and consider making a donation if you would like to support further development. You may also wish to check out our Store, which offers a wide variety of high quality products which will help you get the best of OSMC.

Java and Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • How To Solve Error: “No Main Class Found in NetBeans”
  • A review of Processing books

    Processing is the free and open Java development environment that targets artists who are intrigued by generative code. In essence it is the Java language with a friendly development interface and built-in libraries to get you started.

    There are plenty of ways to learn Processing, including the tutorials on the organisation's website, and the built-in examples that come with the distribution. But if you prefer a printed book, keep reading. This article will review nine available publications, so you can make an informed purchase decision.

    For the sake of completeness I will also append information on two books I haven't had a chance to read.

  • The Digital Cat: Dissecting a Web stack

    Having recently worked with young web developers who were exposed for the first time to proper production infrastructure, I received many questions about the various components that one can find in the architecture of a "Web service". These questions clearly expressed the confusion (and sometimes the frustration) of developers who understand how to create endpoints in a high-level language such as Node.js or Python, but were never introduced to the complexity of what happens between the user's browser and their framework of choice. Most of the times they don't know why the framework itself is there in the first place.

    The challenge is clear if we just list (in random order), some of the words we use when we discuss (Python) Web development: HTTP, cookies, web server, Websockets, FTP, multi-threaded, reverse proxy, Django, nginx, static files, POST, certificates, framework, Flask, SSL, GET, WSGI, session management, TLS, load balancing, Apache.

    In this post, I want to review all the words mentioned above (and a couple more) trying to build a production-ready web service from the ground up. I hope this might help young developers to get the whole picture and to make sense of these "obscure" names that senior developers like me tend to drop in everyday conversations (sometimes arguably out of turn).

  • Restoring intuition over multi-dimensional space

    We would not be human if we did not curse things. As beings that are confined in a three-dimensional world, we tend to blame space whenever we have a problem to visualize data that extend to more than three dimensions. From scientific books and journal papers to simple blog articles and comments the term: “curse of dimensionality” is being repeated like a mantra, almost convincing us that any object, whose nature extends to something more than just “3D” is out of reach to our brains.

    This article is going to discuss neither data visualization nor seek to conform to the common opinion that highly-dimensional space is incomprehensible.

    Quite opposite: the highly-dimensional space is not incomprehensible. It is just weird and less intuitive. Fortunately, take advantage of some mathematical tools and use them as a “free ticket” to gain more intuition. More precisely, we will present three “routes” we can use to get a better feeling on how things play out in “ND space.”

    [...]

    In this article, we have looked into three aspects of the multidimensionality of space. As we couldn’t visualize it (we didn’t even try…), we took advantage of some mathematical mechanisms to gain a bit more insight into the strange behavior of this world. Although not backed with any ultimate proofs, we hope that the mathematical reasoning just presented can spark some inspiration, intuition, and imagination, which is something that is often needed when having to cope with N-dimensions.

  • Airflow By Example

    Apache Airflow is a very interesting, popular and free tool to create, manage and monitor workflows, for example if you want to do ETL (Extract / Transform / Load) on data.

    This sort of enterprise software often may seem complicated or overly unrelated to our everyday experience as developers but ... is it, really? How about if I just want to watch some TV shows? And experiment with some enterprise-level software at the same time?

    Let's do that by learning how to use Airflow to watch TV.

Calculate Linux 20

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Calculate Linux released version 20 at the end of 2019 with major updates and is based off Gentoo. Calculate Linux Desktop (CLD) includes a wizard to configure a connection to Calculate Directory Server. According to their download page, "Calculate Linux Desktop is listed in the Russian Software Register." To sum that up, CLD is a distro from Russia, based off Gentoo, and designed to connect to a Calculate Directory Server. What is a Calculate Directory Server? Well according to their website, "Calculate Directory Server (CDS) is an advanced, LDAP-based authentication server designed to be a domain controller for business networks."

Read more

Wine 5.2 release

Filed under
Software

The Wine development release 5.2 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
- More compatible codepage mapping tables.
- Support for using the null display driver as a real driver.
- Better UTF-8 support in the Resource and Message Compilers.
- Fixes for using ucrtbase as C runtime.
- Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations...

Read more

Also: Wine 5.2 With Better Handling For The Null Display Driver, UTF-8 Support

The Wine 5.2 development release is out

Linux 5.6-rc2

Filed under
Linux

More than halt the rc2 patch is actually Documentaiton updates,
because the kvm docs got turned into RST.

Another notable chunk is just tooling updates, which is about 50/50
perf updates (much of it due to header file syncing) and - again - kvm
updates.

But if you ignore those parts, and look at only the actual kernel code
updates, things look a bit calmer. The bulk ends up being network
driver updates (intel "ice" driver - E800 series - stands out) with
GPU updates a close second (i915, amd, panfrost). There's a few other
driver updates in there too, but they are mostly hidden in the noise
compared to the network and gpu subsystems: rdma, sound, acpi, block,
gpio etc.

Outside of drivers, there's the usual smattering of changes all over.
Filesystems (nfs, ext4, ceph, cifs, btrfs), architecture updates (x86,
arm), and some core code (scheduling, tracing, networking, io_uring).

The shortlog is appended, you can get a feel for the details by scanning it.

Go forth and test,

               Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 5.6-rc2 Released - Led By Documentation + Tooling Updates

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This Week in Linux 93: MATE 1.24, KDE Plasma 5.18, Blender, OpenShot, Evernote, MX Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we have monster of a show with new releases from desktop environments like MATE and KDE Plasma to distro news from MX Linux, Ubuntu, Project Trident and Tiny Core. In App News this week, we see new releases from Blender, OpenShot and some interesting news from Evernote. We’ll also talk about some updates from TLP the laptop performance project and Wayland display server protocol. Later in the show, we’ll check out a cool gaming overlay project called MangoHud and we’ll discuss some Legal News related to Mycroft AI and their fight against a “Patent Troll”. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • How Ceph powers exciting research with Open Source

    As researchers seek scalable, high performance methods for storing data, Ceph is a powerful technology that needs to be at the top of their list. Ceph is an open-source software-defined storage platform. While it’s not often in the spotlight, it’s working hard behind the scenes, playing a crucial role in enabling ambitious, world-renowned projects such as CERN’s particle physics research, Immunity Bio’s cancer research, The Human Brain Project, MeerKat radio telescope, and more. These ventures are propelling the collective understanding of our planet and the human race beyond imaginable realms, and the outcomes will forever change how we perceive our existence and potential. It’s high-time Ceph receives the praise it deserves for powering some of the most exciting research projects on Earth.

  • Kubernetes' Inevitable Takeover of the Data Center
  • How To Drive Infrastructure Like Uber Does
  • DragonFlyBSD 5.8-RC1 Is Ready With Many Changes From DSynth To Performance Optimizations

    Not only did NetBSD 9.0 make its debut today but DragonFlyBSD 5.8 was branched and its first release candidate made while DragonFlyBSD 5.9 is the version now open on Git master.

  • Executive interview: Melissa Di Donato, CEO, SUSE

    New CEO of the world’s largest independent open source company wants to make SUSE more innovative and help businesses to modernise traditional IT

  • Every time Windows 10 Updates, it deletes all saved desktop icons, clears my taskbar, deletes all my saved favorites, passwords, and more!

    Every time my PC updates my desktop wallpaper goes back to default, and all saved icons, favorites, passwords, etc are gone. Every. Single. Time. This is getting tiring and I'm losing so much time at work saving my icons again, paswords, etc. What is going on? Also keeps changing my default printer even when the box is left un-checked, when the computer updates and restarts the box will be checked. Its almost as if the computer is set back to default after every update. Please help. I've tried quite a few things to fix and no luck.

  • February Win10 1903 and 1909 cumulative update, KB 4532693, causing desktops to disappear

    Microsoft should be paying you to beta test their buggy patches.

  • Windows 10: Update KB4532693 kills user data/profile

    There are reports that cumulative update KB4532693 for Windows 10 versions 1903 and 1909 dated February 11, 2020, is causing significant issues for some users. Desktop gone, files gone, icons gone and more.

  • Second Windows 10 update is now causing problems by hiding user profiles

    Windows 10 users are reporting that a second Windows update included in this month's Patch Tuesday is causing problems.

    According to reports, a bug in the KB4532693 update is hiding user profiles and their respective data on some Windows 10 systems.

Devices: Librem 5, USB, SB Servo, and Raspberry Pi/OSMC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets
  • Librem 5 Gyro and Ambient Light Sensor Progress

    The software stack around sensors is coming together piece by piece. It will take longer for features like auto-rotate to start working, but the raw data is there and ready to be used by PureOS and software developers.

  • USB armory Mk II: A secure computer on a USB stick featuring open source hardware design

    The hardware security professionals at F-Secure have created a new version of the USB armory – a computer on a USB stick built from the ground up to be secure.

  • SB Servo is a powerful open source digital serial servo motor

    SB Servo motors have been created to offer affordable, powerful and open-source digital servo motors with Torque, Speed, Position Feedback and full 360-degree rotation mode. Early bird pricing starts from £10 and deliveries are expected to start next month during March 2020.

  • OSMC Skin update

    While we usually release a single monthly update, we've made a number of improvements to the OSMC skin and would like to get these changes out as promptly as possible for feedback.

    [...]

    To get the latest and greatest version of OSMC, simply head to My OSMC -> Updater and check for updates manually on your exising OSMC set up. Of course — if you have updates scheduled automatically you should receive an update notification shortly.

    If you enjoy OSMC, please follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook and consider making a donation if you would like to support further development.

    You may also wish to check out our Store, which offers a wide variety of high quality products which will help you get the best of OSMC.

Brave Browser and DRM With 'Open' Veneer

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Data Doctors: Is the Brave browser safe to use?

    If you’re like most users, you spend more time using a browser than any other program on your computer or smartphone.

    You probably don’t think about what browser you’re using; the focus is on getting to a website, not what got you there.

    Google Chrome is by far the most popular browser, but because it’s a Google product integrated with all their tracking and advertising networks, a lot of people are looking for an alternative.

  • Here’s how to know if the Brave browser is safe to use

    A: If you’re like most users, you spend more time using a browser than any other program on your computer or smartphone.

    You probably don’t think about what browser you’re using as the focus is on getting to a website and not what got you there.

    Google’s Chrome is by far the most popular browser, but because it’s a Google product integrated with all their tracking and advertising networks, a lot of people are looking for an alternative.

  • Netflix Now Exploring AVIF For Image Compression

    Following Netflix's AV1 adoption with collaborating with Intel on the SVT-AV1 encoder, now using AV1 streaming for Android users, and others around this advanced royalty-free video codec, Netflix is now exploring AVIF as their next-gen image format.

    [...]

    Netflix acknowledges the significant need for next-gen image coding that has better compression efficiency and more features than JPEG. Netflix believes AVIF has the potential albeit they aren't yet ready to transition to AVIF today.

    In their testing they are finding good results out of AVIF compared to JPEG and other image formats. For those wanting to go through a long and interesting technical read, on the Netflix Tech Blog they have example screenshots and results comparing their AVIF results to other formats.

  • Netflix begins streaming AV1 content on its Android mobile app

    Netflix today announced that it is beginning to stream videos compressed using the AV1 codec, on its Android mobile app. AV1 is a next-generation, royalty-free video codec that provides compression efficiency that is improved by 20%. This codec, developed to replace VP9, was built by the Alliance for Open Media, of which Netflix, Google, Amazon Prime Video, and more big-name content providers are a part of.

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Best open source cloud-storage services

    Worried about storing your private files with data-hungry tech giants such as Google and Microsoft? Here are three open source alternatives

  • New Open-Source Software SHARPy Launched

    The Aeroelastics Research Group has launched an open-source software tool – SHARPy

    The tool offers dynamic simulation for everything from wind turbines to solar-powered aircraft.

    SHARPy (which stands for Simulation of High-Aspect Ratio aeroplanes in Python) is a dynamic aeroelasticity simulation package. It offers structural, aerodynamic and coupled aeroelastic/flight dynamics analysis, and has particular application for low-speed and very flexible aircraft, and for wind turbines.

  • Iowa Caucus App Fiasco Shows Need for Open Source Transparency

    The Iowa caucuses were thrown into disarray as reports surfaced an opaque app used to tabulate the results and report them to Democratic Party officials was reporting only part of the required data. Although the app had been developed to improve efficiency in communicating the final caucus tallies, it ended up causing significant delays. According to security experts, the incident served to highlight the risks of relying on digital systems and the centralization of information, and a lack of transparency regarding these systems.

  • How to Vet the Engineering Chops of Your Software Vendors

    After witnessing the debacle in Iowa, campaign decision-makers across the country are wondering just how good is the engineering behind the software they purchase for their campaigns? And for good reason: the stakes couldn’t be higher.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: OWASP SAMM

    The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) has announced version 2 of the Software Assurance Maturity Model (SAMM). SAMM is an open-source framework that enables teams and developers to assess, formulate and implement better security strategies that can be integrated into the software development life cycle.

  • Austin Alexander Burridge of Rosemount Compares Open-Source and Proprietary Software Security

    When open-source software developers are made aware of a specific security vulnerability or bug in their software products, they often publish the vulnerability to the community. If there's a developer who wants to offer a fix, he can build one and publish it as a particular version. If there's no funding to develop an upgrade, an IT professional is still aware of the problem so that he can create a custom workaround for his company's unique system until an updated version of the software becomes available.

  • Robust security crucial for adoption of open source

    New Delhi [India], Feb 11 (ANI/NewsVoir): While speaking at the inaugural session of the "3rd Open Source Summit 2020" recently in New Delhi, Vivek Banzal, Director (CFA), Bharat Sachar Nigam Limited (BSNL) said that it is a challenge to keep pace with the technology, more so when security of data has to be quite robust.

    [...]

    "The Government of India has encouraged the adoption of this technology in the Digital India initiative and this has further encouraged the CIO's of enterprises and other government organizations to make a move towards Open source technology. The rise of digital transformation in India has pushed the adoption of open source both by enterprises and government," said Sunil Kumar, Deputy Director-General, National Informatics Centre (NIC), while commenting on the adoption of Open source by the Government to India.

  • Leaders share how agencies bring agility into application development

    Additionally, tapping into open source development communities allows them to overcome some of chronic IT skills gaps many agencies continue to face.

    [...]

    Open source is being used both in civilian and defense agencies. Even though open source code is used for unclassified applications, it does not mean it’s unsecure, assures Michael Kanaan, co-chair of artificial intelligence and machine learning for the U.S. Air Force.

  • The Top 13 Free and Open Source RPA Tools

    Searching for Robotic Process Automation (RPA) software can be a daunting (and expensive) process, one that requires long hours of research and deep pockets. The most popular RPA tools often provide more than what’s necessary for non-enterprise organizations, with advanced functionality relevant to only the most technically savvy users. Thankfully, there are a number of free and open source RPA tools out there. Some of these solutions are offered by vendors looking to eventually sell you on their enterprise product, and others are maintained and operated by a community of developers looking to democratize robotic process automation.

    In this article, we will examine free and open source RPA tools, first by providing a brief overview of what to expect and also with short blurbs of the options currently available in the space. This is the most complete and up-to-date directory on the web.

  • The Two Faces of Open Source: ECT News Roundtable, Episode 5

    The open source software movement has evolved dramatically over the past two decades. Many businesses that once considered open source a threat now recognize its value.

    On the other hand, in spite of increased enthusiasm among enterprises, consumer interest by and large has not materialized.

    With large companies increasingly embracing open source, what does it mean to be a part of the free and open source software, or FOSS, "community"?

  • Pimcore’s free, open source digital experience platform - a rock tossed into the CX pond?

    The retail and eCommerce landscapes have changed dramatically over the past decade as customer experience has risen to the forefront of enterprise marketing priorities. Marketers have turned their focus away from price as the key driver of sales to their ability to deliver the most convenient, streamlined and personalized experiences across channels whether online, in-store, or on mobile phones.

    [...]

    Their solution Pimcore, introduced in 2013, is a free open source software platform for managing digital data and customer experiences for any channel, device, or industry.

  • Chef Serves Up Partner Program to Push Open DevOps Model

    Aims to help channel sell 100% open-source portfolio

  • Chef Introduces New Global Partner Program Purpose-Built for 100 Percent Open Source Software

    Chef, the leader in DevOps, today announced a new channel program specifically designed to ensure that partners and customers are able to take maximum advantage of Chef’s 100 percent open source business model. The Chef Partner Program (CPP) creates three tiers of partners -- Principal, Senior and Junior -- with the highest benefits and incentives applied to those who drive the strongest results for themselves and their mutual enterprise customers using Chef Enterprise Automation Stack.

  • CableLabs, Altran team to take open source to the edge

    Altran and CableLabs have teamed up on "Project Adrenaline," an open source initiative that aims to help the cable industry build and manage edge networks and smooth the path for apps that can run on them.

    And while Adrenaline is initially focused on cable, the broader aim is to apply the resulting open source platform to multiple industries while still staying aligned with Kubernetes.

  • Building even more of LibreOffice with Meson, now with graphics

    Note that this contains only the main deliverables, i.e. the shared libraries and executables. Unit tests and the like are not converted apart from a few sample tests.

    It was mentioned in an earlier blog post that platform abstraction layers are the trickiest ones to build. This turns out to be the case here also. LO has at least three such frameworks (depending on how you count them). SAL is the very basic layer, UNO is a component model used to, for example, expose functionality to Java. Finally VCL is the GUI toolkit abstraction layer. Now that we have the GUI toolkit and its GTK plugin built we can build a VCL sample application and launch it. It looks like this:

  • XSS vulnerability patched in TinyMCE

    A security update has been released for the popular open source text editor TinyMCE after a researcher discovered a a cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability impacting three of its plugins.

  • Should You Opt For An Open-Source LMS [Ed: The proprietary software LMS vendors badmouthing Free software as if that means "no support" (which is exactly the opposite of what's true, the support of the lifeline of the developers)]

    In the modern world, organizations are increasingly using learning management systems (LMS) for corporate training. However, with the availability of both open-source LMS and commercial LMS, choosing the more appropriate one for your organization can be challenging.

    Although leading open-source industry pioneers such as Moodle has dominated eLearning over the past few years, many organizations still prefer proprietary LMS over open-source LMS. In this article, we have assessed both these options and jotted down the factors you must consider before making a decision.

  • Open Source Community Responds to Rapid Adoption of Tech in Financial Services as FINOS Announces New Fintech Members

    The companies include: EPAM Systems, Inc., a product development, digital platform engineering, and digital and product design agency; NearForm, an open source solutions design and delivery company; and CloudBees, a provider of DevOps solutions.

  • Finos welcomes new members

    Finos (Fintech Open Source Foundation), a nonprofit whose mission is to foster adoption of open source, open standards, and collaborative software development practices in financial services, today announces the addition of three established fintechs to its already growing membership roster of prestigious financial institutions, technology companies and global consultancies.

  • Open source licence series - Cockroach Labs: Scaling a sustainable open source business model

    Big cloud vendors have preyed upon open source R&D by providing open source software (OSS) software as-a-service to edge out small competitors. Combine that with the platform benefits of economies of scale and greater opportunities for integration… and you can see how the big cloud providers can drown open source startups.

    That said, companies eclipsing growth-stage and legacy companies looking to store mission-critical data in the cloud are becoming wary of big vendors not investing in their R&D.

  • Open source licence series - OpenStack Foundation: Protecting open source freedoms

    Reduced to its essence, free and open source software is defining a set of freedoms, encoded into software licences.

    The Open Source Initiative (OSI) maintains an open source definition and a list of compatible licences, with the double goal of guaranteeing those essential freedoms and rights… and facilitating adoption by limiting licence proliferation.

  • Open source energy modelling tool shows how to decarbonise Australia

    The future of Australia’s energy mix has spawned innumerable heated arguments over how to balance secure electricity supply with economic and environmental needs, prompting energy consultants ITP to launch an open source modelling tool to settle arguments and provide clarity.

    Inspired by similar open source models in Europe and North America, ITP launched the openCEM model as a free, transparent tool to cut through the complexity of Australia’s energy mix and how it can securely transition away from carbon.

    “ITP felt, as many have felt, that public discussions around renewables were fraught with many assumptions and made with few facts and little expertise,” ITP strategy group manager Oliver Woldring said.

    [..]

    Once openCEM is being used widely by policy makers and investors across Australia, ITP and ThoughtWorks aims to engage other markets across APAC and further afield, about creating tools to model uptakes of renewables into the grids of other countries.

  • Self-driving car dataset missing labels for pedestrians, cyclists

    A popular self-driving car dataset for training machine-learning systems – one that’s used by thousands of students to build an open-source self-driving car – contains critical errors and omissions, including missing labels for hundreds of images of bicyclists and pedestrians.

    Machine learning models are only as good as the data on which they’re trained. But when researchers at Roboflow, a firm that writes boilerplate computer vision code, hand-checked the 15,000 images in Udacity Dataset 2, they found problems with 4,986 – that’s 33% – of those images.

  • New Project Eyes an Open Platform for Data From mHealth Wearables

    A Massachusetts-based partnership aims to create a common workplace for healthcare providers and researchers using mHealth sensors in wearables and other devices.

    The Open Wearables Initiative (OWEAR), launched last September by Nextbridge Health, Shimmer Research and Dr. Vincent van Hees, announced that it is now “actively soliciting” open-source software and datasets from wearable sensors and other connected health technologies. The group wants to create a platform from which researchers and care providers can share digital health source codes and algorithms.

  • Monash Uni, Red Cross & Red Crescent team up on open-source video program

    Monash University’s Faculty of Information Technology (IT), the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) have announced that they have developed an innovative approach to empower communities around the world through development of a special video program.

    According to a joint statement from Monash, the Red Cross and Red Crescent some of the world’s most isolated and remote communities will now have the ability to share their stories and raise public awareness of the local issues they’re facing “through a unique open-source video program developed by Monash”.

Openwashing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Security/Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt/Fear-mongering

Filed under
Security
  • HackIllinois 2020 introduces new software, workshops

    This hackathon has grown to become one of the largest and most well-regarded in the country, with attendees from around the country traveling to Illinois to test and build their hacking skills.
    According to Opensource.com, open-source software is “software with source code that anyone can inspect, modify and enhance,” thereby allowing participants to focus on open exchange and collaboration during the one-of-a-kind event.

  • Hacking Group Outlaw Upgrades Malware for Illicit Income Sources: Report

    Cybersecurity firm Trend Micro has detected that hacking group Outlaw has been updating its toolkit for stealing enterprises’ data for nearly half a year at this point.
    Outlaw — who had ostensibly been silent since last June — became active again in December, with upgrades on their kits’ capabilities, which now target more systems, according to an analysis from Trend Micro published on Feb. 10. The kits in question are designed to steal data from the automotive and finance industries.

  • What happens when all the tiny satellites we’re shooting into space get hacked?
  • Hackers Could Shut Down Satellites—or Turn Them into Weapons

    Last month, SpaceX became the operator of the world’s largest active satellite constellation. As of the end of January, the company had 242 satellites orbiting the planet with plans to launch 42,000 over the next decade. This is part of its ambitious project to provide internet access across the globe. The race to put satellites in space is on, with Amazon, U.K.-based OneWeb and other companies chomping at the bit to place thousands of satellites in orbit in the coming months.

  • DevOps Alert: 12,000 Jenkins Servers Exposed to DoS Attacks [Ed: The ‘logic’ of this clickbait headline? Same as “1,000 MILLION browser users exposed to x, y, z…”]

    Security researchers are warning that 12,000 cloud automation servers around the world could be hijacked to launch denial of service (DoS) attacks.

IBM and Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Can IBM’s New Duopoly Produce A Unifying Vision?
  • IBM Watson And The Value Of Open [Ed: Well, Watson is proprietary software. This is cheap, low-grade openwashing. See authors here. Forbes apparently takes IBM money for marketing/propaganda.]

    Not so long ago, back in 2011, IBM’s artificial intelligence technology (later packaged and sold as Watson) triumphed in the game of Jeopardy. Watson played against the two most successful contestants ever to appear on the show. This victory reflected the result of an enormous amount of work done by IBM and others to mine human language for the semantic meaning of words, and allow a machine to answer Jeopardy questions that would have been impossible for any computer just a few years earlier.

  • IBM CTO: Edge Will Implode Without Open Source [Ed: This guy is CTO of IBM proprietary software (Watson). Do as I say, not as I do...?]

    Edge computing devices are proliferating at an astonishing rate, jumping from about 15 billion devices today to about 55 billion by 2022, according to Rob High, VP and CTO of IBM Watson.

  • IBM on the first open source security platform
  • Crunchy PostgreSQL for Kubernetes 4.2 Receives Red Hat OpenShift Operator Certification

    Crunchy Data, the leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL technology and support, is pleased to announce that Crunchy PostgreSQL for Kubernetes 4.2 has achieved the "auto pilot" capability level as part of Red Hat OpenShift Operator Certification. The "auto pilot" capability level designates the highest level of automation associated with Operator technologies, including PostgreSQL cluster self-healing after a failover event and advanced high-availability configurations for workloads sensitive to transaction loss.

  • Minicomputers and The Soul of a New Machine

    The Command Line Heroes podcast is back, and this season it covers the machines that run all the programming languages I covered last season. As the podcast staff puts it:

    "This season, we'll look at what happens when idealistic teams come together to build visionary machines. Machines made with leaps of faith and a lot of hard, often unrecognized, work in basements and stifling cubicles. Machines that brought teams together and changed us as a society in ways we could only dream of."

    This first episode looks at the non-fiction book (and engineering classic), The Soul of a New Machine, to look at a critical moment in computing history. It covers the transition from large, hulking mainframes to the intermediate step of the minicomputer, which will eventually lead us to the PC revolution that we're still living in the wake of.

  • Fedora 31 : Can be better? part 006.

    I try to use the Selinux MLS with Fedora 31 and I wrote on my last article about Fedora 31 : Can be better? part 005.After relabeling the files and start the environment I get multiple errors and I ask an answer at fedoraproject lists: This is an example of the problem of implementing MLS in Fedora and can be remedied because MLS Selinux is old in implementing Selinux.

  • [Older] Red Hat fights for software freedom by filing a brief with the US Supreme Court

    The United States Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal of a lower court decision: Oracle v. Google. Red Hat, one of the leaders of the open source community, has emphasized to the USSC that software interfaces should not become subject to copyright protection and are not copyrightable by design. Read the complete amicus brief filed by Red Hat and IBM.

    [...]

    As we state clearly in the opening statement of our brief, Red Hat — as a leader in the open source community — emphasised to the USSC the critical importance of maintaining the long-standing view that software interfaces should not be subject to copyright protection.

    Because computer programs achieve compatibility and interoperability with each other through specifically defined interfaces, the concern is that if copyright protection were to exist in such interfaces, the open source community could face significant barriers in the creation and implementation of new software modules to replace existing modules. This consequence may chill the innovation that is generated by open source software community development.

    Our brief also recognises that computer interfaces being uncopyrightable does not jeopardise copyright protection in software programs generally. Red Hat fully supports software programmers developing value and differentiating themselves in the marketplace via implementation code. In fact, the more freely that computer interfaces are available, the more of a market may exist for particular implementations using an existing computer interface.

Linux Foundation: Hyperledger, Zeyphyr and LF Energy

Filed under
OSS
  • Isreali exchange's DLT securities lending platform nears completion

    Hyperledger Sawtooth is an open-source enterprise blockchain network that is hosted as part of the ‘Hyperledger Greenhouse’ but which is distinctly different from better known open source projects such as Fabric and Indy.

    Johnston-Watt tells SLT that, besides being open source, industry agnostic and governed by the Hyperledger Foundation, the key point in favour of Hyperledger Sawtooth is its pluggable consensus mechanism.

  • Zeyphyr at Embedded World

    The last 20 years have seen a tremendous surge of new technologies and capabilities emerge from open source software. These open source building blocks have become increasingly attractive as the base for innovative new products. Safety critical applications are now using them as well, but we lack infrastructure to assess when this software is safe to use, that can keep up with the rate of change of open source development. Her talk will look at some of the challenges and approaches to building trust and confidence in open source used in safety critical software coming to new products. The approaches taken by 3 open source projects (Linux, Xen, Zephyr) will be discussed and contrasted.

  • Equinix Joins LF Edge as Premier Member to Further Open Source Momentum Across Unified Edge

    ...a leading global interconnection and data center company, has joined LF Edge as the newest Premier member. Equinix joins LF Edge as the project celebrates its first year of collaborative integration across the open source edge.

  • LF Energy and Alliander announce GXF to tackle interoperability on the Dutch power grid

    LF Energy is working with Dutch distribution system operator Alliander to utilise, on its open-source community, Alliander’s Grid eXchange Fabric (GXF), a scalable and technology-agnostic industrial Internet of Things (IoT) platform that allows grid operators to securely collect data and monitor, control and manage smart devices on the grid.

  • LF Energy Ecosystem Gains Momentum for Open Source Innovation With New Members and Projects

    LF Energy, a Linux Foundation initiative developing and sustaining open source technology innovation in the energy and electricity sectors, is rapidly growing its community with additional founding Premier member, Faraday Grid, joining RTE. New General members include IBM, OSISoft, and Recurve; while Elering AS, Energinet, Energy Foundation, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Fraunhofer IEE, FIWARE Foundation, Iowa State University, Monash University, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), North Carolina State University FREEDM Center, Project Haystack, Stanford University, TenneT, The Energy Coalition, University of Kassel, and Washington State University join European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E) and Vanderbilt University as new Associate members.

Programming: Wind River's CI/CD, Mint, Python and Java

Filed under
Development
  • Wind River Launches CD Platform for Embedded Systems

    Glenn Seiler, vice president for open source strategy for Wind River, said the CD platform is based on an open source instance of the Jenkins continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) platform. The company envisions organizations downloading the platform as source code that Wind River will update regularly for use on top of the Wind River Linux platform, he said.

    Wind River is taking advantage of containers, Kubernetes, the Puppet IT automation framework and a repository to ease deployment of its CD platform, added Seiler. The company is committed to providing updates to that platform, which Wind River uses internally, at least every three weeks, said Seiler.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Mint

    Mint is a programming language for the front-end web that aims to solve the common issues of Single Page Applications (SPAs) at a language level.

     It is a compiler and a framework combined to provide great developer experience while allowing users to write safe, readable and maintainable code, according to the developers behind the project.

    The common issues that it attempts to fix are regard reusable components, styling routing, global and local state handling, and synchronous and asynchronous computations that might fail.

    “It was born out of the frustration of the JavaScript language and ecosystem (NPM) and the Elm language and it’s not so open development practices,” Mint said on its website. “Mint aims to combine the developer experience of Elm and the expressiveness of React to create the perfect language for building single-page applications.”

  • PyPy and CFFI have moved to Heptapod

    It has been a very busy month, not so much because of deep changes in the JIT of PyPy but more around the development, deployment, and packaging of the project.

  • Your Guide to Reading Excel (xlsx) Files in Python

    In this brief Python tutorial, we are going to learn how to read Excel (xlsx) files using Python. Specifically, we will read xlsx files in Python using the Python module openpyxl. First, we start by the simplest example of reading a xlsx file in Python. Second, we will learn how to read multiple Excel files using Python.

  • CausalNex: An open-source Python library that helps data scientists to infer causation rather than observing correlation

    CausalNex is a Python library that allows data scientists and domain experts to co-develop models that go beyond correlation and consider causal relationships. ‘CasualNex’ provides a practical ‘what if’ library which is deployed to test scenarios using Bayesian Networks (BNs).

  • Programming languages: Java developers flock to Kotlin and ditch Oracle JDK for OpenJDK [Ed: CBS tabloid ZDNet does puff pieces for Snyk now. A Microsoft-connected attack dog -- one  which badmouths FOSS and now pretends to have a 'study' (self-promotion stunt) on programming trends...]

    The vast majority of developers who use a JVM (Java Virtual Machine) language still use Java, but a sizable chunk of the population is shifting to Kotlin, a JVM-compatible language developed by JetBrains, which Google is encouraging developers to use for Android development.  

The best free and open-source alternatives to Google Keep on Android

Filed under
Android
GNU
OSS

While it might be difficult to switch away from feature-packed products like Gmail and Google Maps, there are thankfully plenty of competitors to Google Keep. After all, you don't need millions of data points and industry-leading artificial intelligence to make a note-taking app. In this post, we'll be checking out some free and open-source alternatives to Google Keep, some of which even have cloud sync.

Read more

Academic Writing Tools on GNU/Linux - Free Software Only

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This is my list of GNU/Linux tools for academic, educational, and research purposes which all are free software. I tried to pick up choices as simple as possible here just to represent every basic category and further I hope you could see more alternatives if you want. I also listed several specific tools like GNU Octave and Parallel which are proven to be useful for certain researches. On the other hand, I deliberately did not list LaTeX tools here as I already chosen LibreOffice for that category. I made every proprietary software name italicized here so you can spot them on easier. Happy researching!

Read more

Open Source Audio-Video: 8 Replacements for Expensive Applications

Filed under
Software

Open source audio-video software offers an alternative to paying for expensive proprietary software. And in many cases, the open source options are as good as or better than the comparable commercial, proprietary solutions. In fact, users site the top reasons why they use open source software as: the features, freedom from vendor lock-in and the quality of the solutions. Price and total cost of ownership weren't even on the list. In other words, people are using open source because the software is so good, and the fact that it is free is just a side benefit.

The list of audio-video software below includes a variety of open source software for home users and SMBs. All of these applications can replace commercial products that can carry high prices. Even if buyers choose to purchase support or other services for their open source software, the open source options are generally much more affordable than the comparable proprietary solutions.

Read more

Also: Record screencast or web cam video with VokoscreenNG an open source program for Windows and Linux

Games: Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac, Iris and the Giant, The Farlanders and Westmark Manor

Filed under
Gaming
  • Comedy cosmic horror adventure 'Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac' releasing on February 26

    Mixing comedy with cosmic horror might seem a little weird and it is, Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac is releasing with Linux support on February 26.

    The first game from French studio La Poule Noire, Edgar - Bokbok in Boulzac has you play as the eccentric outcast Edgar whose best friend is a Chicken. Unfortunately, a sudden disaster forces you out of your shack and towards the bright lights of the big city, Boulzac, where an 800 year old fire rages beneath the surface, and weird things are afoot.

  • Fusing a deck-builder and a narrative adventure 'Iris and the Giant' releases February 27 - demo up

    Developer Louis Rigaud and publisher Goblinz Studio have announced their fusion of a deck-builder with a narrative adventure and turn-based battles, Iris and the Giant, is going to release on February 27.

    They say it mixes together "a collectible card game with RPG and roguelike elements", with you playing a Iris who must brave her fears in her imaginary world. Behind the game's unique minimalist art style players will explore a touching story of a young woman facing her inner demons and soothing the raging giant inside.

  • Martian city-builder 'The Farlanders' has a big new release up with a Happiness system

    Sweet small city-builder The Farlanders is evolving into a bigger game, with a new release now up introducing some fresh game mechanics.

    A game covered here briefly last year, as a promising up-and-coming city-builder that was aiming to do things a little bit differently and that feeling continues with this new build. Version 0.3.0 introduces a Happiness system, there's new types of terrain and terraforming options, new building types and the game has gone through an overhaul on the balance.

  • Explore a dark mansion in the survival horror 'Westmark Manor' releasing this year

    Sometime later this Summer, Westmark Manor will take you on a journey into the occult and the developer Nodbrim Interactive is planning to get it on Linux too.

    It's a mixture of gameplay elements here with exploration, puzzle solving and survival and it sounds like plenty of inventory management too as you acquire the tools needed to progress through different rooms in a mansion. Two days ago they put up a reveal trailer and while a bit dark (visually), it gives an interesting look into the horrifying things you will get up to in Westmark Manor.

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More in Tux Machines

Wine 5.2 release

The Wine development release 5.2 is now available. What's new in this release (see below for details): - More compatible codepage mapping tables. - Support for using the null display driver as a real driver. - Better UTF-8 support in the Resource and Message Compilers. - Fixes for using ucrtbase as C runtime. - Various bug fixes. The source is available from the following locations... Read more Also: Wine 5.2 With Better Handling For The Null Display Driver, UTF-8 Support The Wine 5.2 development release is out

Linux 5.6-rc2

More than halt the rc2 patch is actually Documentaiton updates,
because the kvm docs got turned into RST.

Another notable chunk is just tooling updates, which is about 50/50
perf updates (much of it due to header file syncing) and - again - kvm
updates.

But if you ignore those parts, and look at only the actual kernel code
updates, things look a bit calmer. The bulk ends up being network
driver updates (intel "ice" driver - E800 series - stands out) with
GPU updates a close second (i915, amd, panfrost). There's a few other
driver updates in there too, but they are mostly hidden in the noise
compared to the network and gpu subsystems: rdma, sound, acpi, block,
gpio etc.

Outside of drivers, there's the usual smattering of changes all over.
Filesystems (nfs, ext4, ceph, cifs, btrfs), architecture updates (x86,
arm), and some core code (scheduling, tracing, networking, io_uring).

The shortlog is appended, you can get a feel for the details by scanning it.

Go forth and test,

               Linus
Read more Also: Linux 5.6-rc2 Released - Led By Documentation + Tooling Updates

today's leftovers

  • This Week in Linux 93: MATE 1.24, KDE Plasma 5.18, Blender, OpenShot, Evernote, MX Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we have monster of a show with new releases from desktop environments like MATE and KDE Plasma to distro news from MX Linux, Ubuntu, Project Trident and Tiny Core. In App News this week, we see new releases from Blender, OpenShot and some interesting news from Evernote. We’ll also talk about some updates from TLP the laptop performance project and Wayland display server protocol. Later in the show, we’ll check out a cool gaming overlay project called MangoHud and we’ll discuss some Legal News related to Mycroft AI and their fight against a “Patent Troll”. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • How Ceph powers exciting research with Open Source

    As researchers seek scalable, high performance methods for storing data, Ceph is a powerful technology that needs to be at the top of their list. Ceph is an open-source software-defined storage platform. While it’s not often in the spotlight, it’s working hard behind the scenes, playing a crucial role in enabling ambitious, world-renowned projects such as CERN’s particle physics research, Immunity Bio’s cancer research, The Human Brain Project, MeerKat radio telescope, and more. These ventures are propelling the collective understanding of our planet and the human race beyond imaginable realms, and the outcomes will forever change how we perceive our existence and potential. It’s high-time Ceph receives the praise it deserves for powering some of the most exciting research projects on Earth.

  • Kubernetes' Inevitable Takeover of the Data Center
  • How To Drive Infrastructure Like Uber Does
  • DragonFlyBSD 5.8-RC1 Is Ready With Many Changes From DSynth To Performance Optimizations

    Not only did NetBSD 9.0 make its debut today but DragonFlyBSD 5.8 was branched and its first release candidate made while DragonFlyBSD 5.9 is the version now open on Git master.

  • Executive interview: Melissa Di Donato, CEO, SUSE

    New CEO of the world’s largest independent open source company wants to make SUSE more innovative and help businesses to modernise traditional IT

  • Every time Windows 10 Updates, it deletes all saved desktop icons, clears my taskbar, deletes all my saved favorites, passwords, and more!

    Every time my PC updates my desktop wallpaper goes back to default, and all saved icons, favorites, passwords, etc are gone. Every. Single. Time. This is getting tiring and I'm losing so much time at work saving my icons again, paswords, etc. What is going on? Also keeps changing my default printer even when the box is left un-checked, when the computer updates and restarts the box will be checked. Its almost as if the computer is set back to default after every update. Please help. I've tried quite a few things to fix and no luck.

  • February Win10 1903 and 1909 cumulative update, KB 4532693, causing desktops to disappear

    Microsoft should be paying you to beta test their buggy patches.

  • Windows 10: Update KB4532693 kills user data/profile

    There are reports that cumulative update KB4532693 for Windows 10 versions 1903 and 1909 dated February 11, 2020, is causing significant issues for some users. Desktop gone, files gone, icons gone and more.

  • Second Windows 10 update is now causing problems by hiding user profiles

    Windows 10 users are reporting that a second Windows update included in this month's Patch Tuesday is causing problems. According to reports, a bug in the KB4532693 update is hiding user profiles and their respective data on some Windows 10 systems.

Devices: Librem 5, USB, SB Servo, and Raspberry Pi/OSMC

  • Librem 5 Gyro and Ambient Light Sensor Progress

    The software stack around sensors is coming together piece by piece. It will take longer for features like auto-rotate to start working, but the raw data is there and ready to be used by PureOS and software developers.

  • USB armory Mk II: A secure computer on a USB stick featuring open source hardware design

    The hardware security professionals at F-Secure have created a new version of the USB armory – a computer on a USB stick built from the ground up to be secure.

  • SB Servo is a powerful open source digital serial servo motor

    SB Servo motors have been created to offer affordable, powerful and open-source digital servo motors with Torque, Speed, Position Feedback and full 360-degree rotation mode. Early bird pricing starts from £10 and deliveries are expected to start next month during March 2020.

  • OSMC Skin update

    While we usually release a single monthly update, we've made a number of improvements to the OSMC skin and would like to get these changes out as promptly as possible for feedback. [...] To get the latest and greatest version of OSMC, simply head to My OSMC -> Updater and check for updates manually on your exising OSMC set up. Of course — if you have updates scheduled automatically you should receive an update notification shortly. If you enjoy OSMC, please follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook and consider making a donation if you would like to support further development. You may also wish to check out our Store, which offers a wide variety of high quality products which will help you get the best of OSMC.