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Tuesday, 31 Mar 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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IEEE Launches an Open Source Collaboration Platform

Filed under
News

IEEE Standards Association has announced a GitLab-based open source collaboration platform. Read how is it different and what advantages it has.
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Pixelorama – Open Source Editor for Pixel Art

Filed under
OSS

Pixelorama is an open-source application designed for creating pixel art. It was built using Godot – an open-source, multi-platform 2d and 3d game engine. Although still in baby stages, Pixelorama already boasts a clean user interface and a long list of features that enable users to get started with pixel art projects.

The Pixelorama update is version 0.6 and it ships with a handful of exciting features which include support for multiple themes, a splash screen, layer opacity, more localizations, improved brushes, colour palettes, and constrained angles in straight lines.

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IEEE Standards Association Launches an Open Source Collaboration Platform

Filed under
OSS

IEEE is the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology. The IEEE Standards Association (IEEE SA) is an organization within IEEE that develops global standards in a broad range of industries.

The IEEE Standards Association (SA) has come up with an open-source collaboration platform i.e IEEE SA Open.

It is technically a self-hosted GitLab instance combined with Mattermost (a slack alternative) and GitLab Pages. To describe it further, the official blog post mentioned...

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Canonical Doubles Down on Raspberry Pi Support, Promises New Tools and Services

Filed under
Ubuntu

After publishing their roadmap last year in November and making it easier to download Ubuntu for Raspberry Pi in early February 2020, Canonical keeps on its promise to fully support Raspberry Pi devices for its Ubuntu Linux operating system with a plethora of upcoming goodies.

First and foremost, the company behind Ubuntu added support for the latest Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) release for 32-bit Raspberry Pi 2, 3 and 4 models, as well as Compute Modules, and 64-bit Raspberry Pi 3 and 4 models.

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Telegram Desktop 2.0 Release Adds Chat Folders, New Animated Emoji

Filed under
OSS

Telegram Desktop 2.0 arrives five months after the 1.9 series and more than three years after the 1.0 milestone. As expected, this is major update and introduces several new features.

One of the biggest new feature of the Telegram Desktop 2.0 release include the ability to organize your chats into so-called “Chat Folders” whenever you think you have too many chats opened.

Another interesting feature is support for creating custom folders with flexible settings. In addition, the client now also lets users use default recommendations when creating custom folders.

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Critical Linux Kernel Vulnerability Patched in Ubuntu 19.10 and 18.04.4 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Security
Ubuntu

Discovered by Manfred Paul, the security vulnerability (CVE-2020-8835) was found in Linux kernel’s BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter) verifier, which incorrectly calculated register bounds for certain operations.

This could allow a local attacker to either expose sensitive information (kernel memory) or gain administrative privileges and run programs as root user.

The security issue affects all Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) and Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS (Bionic Beaver) releases running Linux kernel 5.3 on 64-bit, Raspberry Pi, KVM, as well as cloud environments like AWS, Azure, GCP, GKE, and Oracle Cloud.

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Flatpak 1.7 Enters Development with New Features and Improvements

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Linux

The Flatpak 1.7 series debuts with a major change, namely simplified installation of the OSTree P2P (Peer-to-peer) support.

As such, Flatpak 1.7 and later versions will no longer support installing apps from local network peers. Additionally, sideloading from a local USB stick will no longer be automatic and users must enable the feature by configuring a sideload repository.

The sideload repository can be created by symlinking to it from /var/lib/flatpak/sideload-repos or /run/flatpak/sideload-repos, said Alexander Larsson, who promises that the P2P support will be more efficient due to this change.

The first release in the Flatpak 1.7 unstable series also introduces new “host-etc” and “host-os” file system permissions to give access to system /usr and /etc.

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Ubuntu 20.04 GNOME X.Org vs. Wayland Session Performance Impact For Gaming

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

In the past using the Wayland-based GNOME Shell session and other Wayland compositors has generally resulted in a performance hit in going through (X)Wayland but that is much less so these days. Here are some initial benchmarks of Ubuntu 20.04 running various Steam Linux gaming benchmarks both under the default X.Org-based session and then again when using the Wayland session and its (X)Wayland support.

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Where are the best GNOME communities

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GNOME

As with all open source projects, GNOME is developed by volunteers as well as employees. These people communicate in many ways to drive the project forward. For development, the old way is mailing lists for discussion and repository sites for the actual code and issue tracking. When you want something that does not exist yet or have a problem you cannot solve, you need to find the communities passionate about GNOME. This takes a bit of effort, so here are some places to start. If you start developing, you need to find a community that talks your programming language. Many will also deal with GNOME, as a side effect if not as their main activity.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MERA, Mocana, and Osaka NDS Join Automotive Grade Linux

    Automotive Grade Linux, a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for connected car technologies, announces three new members: MERA, Mocana, and Osaka NDS.

    “With the support of 11 major automakers, we are increasingly seeing more vehicles in production with AGL,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “We look forward to working with all of our new members as we continue to expand the AGL platform and the global ecosystem of products and services that support it.”

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (php-horde-form and tika), Fedora (dcraw and libmodsecurity), Gentoo (libidn2 and screen), openSUSE (cloud-init, cni, cni-plugins, conmon, fuse-overlayfs, podman, opera, phpMyAdmin, python-mysql-connector-python, ruby2.5, strongswan, and tor), Oracle (ipmitool), Scientific Linux (ipmitool), SUSE (spamassassin and tomcat), and Ubuntu (twisted and webkit2gtk).

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl ootw: –proxy-basic

    This option has been provided and supported since curl 7.12.0, released in June 2004.

  • I had to build a web scraper to buy groceries

    Here’s the deal; very few supermarket chains in Turkey have online stores. Migros Sanalmarket is one of them and it’s arguably the best one. But they don’t have unlimited resources, obviously. When everybody decided to switch to online shopping all of a sudden, they couldn’t handle that demand spike. Even though their delivery system works from 8:30 AM to 10:00 PM every day, it’s virtually impossible to find an empty slot, that is if you play nicely.

  • How to mock in Python? – (almost) definitive guide

    Mock is a category of so-called test doubles – objects that mimic the behaviour of other objects. They are meant to be used in tests to replace real implementation that for some reason cannot be used (.e.g because they cause side effects, like transferring funds or launching nukes). Mocks are used to write assertions about the way they are used – e.g. if they were called, which arguments were used etc. It is a flagship technique of interaction-based testing – checking how objects under test use their collaborators (other objects).

  • Rich adds support for Jupyter Notebooks

    I recently added experimental support for Jupyter Notebooks to Rich.

  • How to Use any() in Python

    As a Python programmer, you’ll frequently deal with Booleans and conditional statements—sometimes very complex ones. In those situations, you may need to rely on tools that can simplify logic and consolidate information. Fortunately, any() in Python is such a tool. It looks through the elements in an iterable and returns a single value indicating whether any element is true in a Boolean context, or truthy.

  • Add developer comments to your extension’s listing page on addons.mozilla.org

    In November 2017, addons.mozilla.org (AMO) underwent a major refresh. In addition to updating the site’s visual style, we separated the code for frontend and backend features and re-architected the frontend to use the popular combination of React and Redux.

    With a small team, finite budget, and other competing priorities, we weren’t able to migrate all features to the new frontend. Some features were added to our project backlog with the hope that one day a staff or community member would have the interest and bandwidth to implement it.

    One of these features, a dedicated section for developer comments on extension listing pages, has recently been re-enabled thanks to a contribution by community member Lisa Chan. Extension developers can use this section to inform users about any known issues or other transient announcements.

    [...]

    We’d like to extend a special thanks to Lisa for re-enabling this feature. If you’re interested in contributing code to addons.mozilla.org, please visit our onboarding wiki for information about getting started.

Devices: Seeed, Nexcom and Kontron

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Seeed IoT Button for AWS Brings Back Amazon Dash Button to Life for Developers

    Amazon introduced $5 dash buttons in 2015 to let consumers purchase regular items such as washing powder by simply pressing a button. Some people hacked them for other purposes, for instance as WiFi logging buttons, but the company eventually stopped selling the buttons in February 2019 and fully killed those at the end of August.

  • Rugged embedded PC supports Linux on Apollo Lake

    Nexcom’s rugged, Linux-ready “NISE 108” embedded computer has an Apollo Lake Celeron, triple display support with dual DP, 2x GbE, 4x USB, 3x COM, and M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion.

    Nexcom announced a 185 x 131 x 54mm industrial gateway that runs Linux 4.1 or Win 10 IoT Enterprise on a quad-core, 1.5GHz Celeron J3455 from Intel’s Apollo Lake generation. The fanless NISE 108 is larger and more feature rich than last year’s Apollo Lake based NISE 51, which uses a dual-core, Apollo Lake Celeron N3550.

  • 3.5-inch Whiskey Lake SBC features CNVi-ready M.2 slot for speedy Intel WiFi cards

    Kontron has launched a 3.5″-SBC-WLU SBC that runs Linux or Win 10 on an 8th Gen Whiskey Lake CPU with up to 64GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 4x USB, triple display support, and triple M.2 slots including a CNVi-ready slot.

    Kontron’s 3.5″-SBC-WLU joins at least four other Linux-ready 3.5-inch boards with Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE processors (see farther below). The SBC may be late to the Whiskey Lake party, but it brings a nice party gift: an M.2 E-key slot that supports Intel Integrated Connectivity (CNVi) WiFi/Bluetooth modules, including Intel Wireless-AC and Intel Wireless-Access Point cards.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Linux-Tech&More QA, Linux Action News and Real Python Podcast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 2020-03-30 | Linux Headlines

    Linux Kernel 5.6 is out with WireGuard support, fre:ac significantly expands its feature set with its 1.1 release, Bruce Perens' legal battle finally comes to an end, and the IEEE launches a collaborative development platform.

  • Linux-Tech&More QA: Episode 01: The mysterious operating system!

    We seek, through the episodes of this simple and humble series, to provide Linux, technology and science information (and other important information) in an interesting and funny way to “insert” the information into the mind of the follower and to instill principles and values ​​in their personality.

  • Linux Action News 151

    Mozilla puts your money where your mouse is and partners with Scroll to launch Firefox for a Better Web. We'll explain the details, and why it might just have a shot.

    Plus we try out Plasma Bigscreen, cover Telegram's really bad news, and much more.

  • Real Python: The Real Python Podcast – Episode 2: Learn Python Skills While Creating Games

    In this episode, Christopher interviews Jon Fincher from the Real Python Team. Jon talks about his recent articles on PyGame and Arcade.

    They discuss if game programming is a good way to develop your Python programming skills, and if a game would make a good portfolio piece. He compares the two popular Python game libraries of Arcade and PyGame, and discusses about how to find assets for your own creations.

The Status of Universal Package Systems

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Billed as the future of package management, universal package systems like Snappy and Flatpak have failed to live up to their promise.

Remember universal package systems? Although AppImage, the earliest universal package system, was first released in 2004, the concept did not capture much attention until a decade later, when Canonical released Snappy and Red Hat released Flatpak. Each was presented as the next generation of package managers, usable by any distribution, and as a means to reduce the number of rival technologies. Yet in 2020, both Snappy and Flatpak have receded into the background, and the deb and RPM package management systems continue to dominate Linux, leaving the question of why Snappy and Flatpak did not fulfill their promises.

Two quick searches on DistroWatch reveal that, out of the 273 active distros listed, 39 support Flatpak, and 35 support Snap packages. At first, those may sound like respectable numbers, until you realize that a much more arcane deviation from the norm, like distros that do not ship systemd, can boast 99 distros. Moreover, those figures consist mainly of major distros that support Flatpak and Snap -- often both -- but still depend primarily on traditional package managers.

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Software: MystiQ, GnuCash, OpenTelemetry, Zeek and Jitsi

Filed under
Software
  • MystiQ Is An Easy To Use FFmpeg GUI (Multimedia Converter) For Linux And Windows

    MystiQ is a fairly new Qt5/C++ FFmpeg-based audio and video converter for Linux and Microsoft Windows. A macOS version will also be available in the future.

    I want to note that while the application is referred to as "MystiQ Video Converter" on its website, it actually supports both audio and video files.

    This FFmpeg GUI comes with an easy-to-use user interface intended to get things done without distracting the user. It supports all the popular audio and video formats supported by FFmpeg, and comes with many presets.

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  • GnuCash 3.9

    GnuCash is a personal and small business finance application, freely licensed under the GNU GPL and available for GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. It’s designed to be easy to use, yet powerful and flexible. GnuCash allows you to track your income and expenses, reconcile bank accounts, monitor stock portfolios and manage your small business finances. It is based on professional accounting principles to ensure balanced books and accurate reports.

    GnuCash can keep track of your personal finances in as much detail as you prefer. If you are just starting out, use GnuCash to keep track of your checkbook. You may then decide to track cash as well as credit card purchases to better determine where your money is being spent. When you start investing, you can use GnuCash to help monitor your portfolio. Buying a vehicle or a home? GnuCash will help you plan the investment and track loan payments. If your financial records span the globe, GnuCash provides all the multiple-currency support you need.

  • OpenTelemetry is now beta!

    OpenTelemetry and OpenCensus have been a critical part of our goal of making platforms like Kubernetes more observable and more manageable. This has been a multi-year journey for us, from creating OpenCensus and growing it into a core part of major web services’ observability stack, to our announcement of OpenTelemetry last year and the rapid growth of the OpenTelemetry community.

  • Google's OpenTelemetry Reaches Beta For Open-Source Telemetry Purposes

    OpenTelemetry aims to make it easy to provide robust and portable telemetry for cloud-native software. OpenTelemetry supports various programming languages and makes it easy to capture and distribute traces and metrics from arbitrary applications. OpenTelemetry in turn supports sending this telemetry data to different back-ends like Cloud Trace, Jaeger, Prometheus, and others. OpenTelemetry SDKs are offered for the likes of Go, Python, Java, JavaScript, Erlang, .NET, and others.

  • Zeek and Jitsi: 2 open source projects we need now

    Everyone has heard of open source projects like Linux, Kubernetes, and MySQL. Far fewer have heard of ROS (Robot Operating System), Apache Flink, or InfluxDB, though these open source projects, too, are getting noticed. However, virtually no one has heard of open source Zeek or Jitsi, despite their having been around for eons. It’s high time Zeek and Jitsi got their due, as they are serving a particularly big need today given world events.

    Zeek, for example, is a network analysis tool that helps organizations hunt down bad actors that have made it past perimeter defenses (and, let’s face it, they will). In our work-from-home world, Jitsi provides video conferencing. Open source may not be for everyone but these open source projects just might be perfect for your organization.

Release of openmediavault 5 (Usul)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

After a long development phase i am happy to announce the release of openmediavault 5 (Usul).

A big thank you goes to all translators, forum moderators and bug reporters for their contributions and support.

The main features at a glance:

Using Debian 10 (Buster).

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GNOME's Red Hat-Centric Infrastructure, Fedora's Git Forge and More Red Hat/IBM

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
  • GNOME Infrastructure updates

    As you may have noticed from outage and maintenance notes we sent out last week the GNOME Infrastructure has been undergoing a major redesign due to the need of moving to a different datacenter. It’s probably a good time to update the Foundation membership, contributions and generally anyone consuming the multitude of services we maintain of what we’ve been up to during these past months.

    [...]

    ...Red Hat Storage Team who helped out reviewing the Ceph infrastructure design and providing useful information about possible provisioning techniques.

  • Fedora's Git forge decision

    Back in February, LWN reported on the process of gathering requirements for a Git forge system. That process then went relatively quiet until March 28, when the posting of a "CPE Weekly" news summary included, under "other updates", a note that the decision has been made. It appears that the project will be pushed toward a not-fully-free version of the GitLab offering. It is fair to say that this decision — or how it was presented — was not met with universal acclaim in the Fedora community; see this response from Neal Gompa for more.

  •  

  • With Kubernetes Operators comes great responsibility

    Operators are a powerful way to extend the functionality of Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and Kubernetes. OpenShift provides features for deploying Operators in a safer way, such as OperatorHub, and the Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM). In this post we explore safe ways to deploy Operators to Openshift 4.x using OperatorHub, OLM and scoping rules for Operators.

  •  

  • The IBM i Community Adapts To The New Normal

    As we enter the third week of the unprecedented coronavirus lockdown that has shut down large swaths of our country, IBM i shops are adapting to the “new normal” along with everybody else. For essential employees in certain industries, that means working in an uncertain and potentially hazardous environment, while for the rest of us, it means telecommuting from home.

    If you work in finance or insurance along the two coasts, chances are good your headquarters has been closed down and your colleagues sent home to work remotely from laptops, smartphones, and PCs. But if your company makes or moves stuff in the industrial heartland of the United States – home to the nation’s strategic paper-products supply – then many of your essential staff are likely trucking right through the coronavirus lockdown. (And if they’re actually in the trucking business, they’re likely enjoying the empty roads.)

Telegram Desktop App Update Adds Chat Folders, New Sidebar

Filed under
Software

A new version of the Telegram desktop app for Windows, macOS and Linux is now available — and it hides some very useful new features.

Desktop Telegram 2.0 echoes some of the changes on offer in the recent Telegram 6.0 update for mobile systems. This includes the ability to organise chats into Chat Folders should you find you have more than is manageable!

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More in Tux Machines

IEEE Standards Association Launches an Open Source Collaboration Platform

IEEE is the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology. The IEEE Standards Association (IEEE SA) is an organization within IEEE that develops global standards in a broad range of industries. The IEEE Standards Association (SA) has come up with an open-source collaboration platform i.e IEEE SA Open. It is technically a self-hosted GitLab instance combined with Mattermost (a slack alternative) and GitLab Pages. To describe it further, the official blog post mentioned... Read more

Canonical Doubles Down on Raspberry Pi Support, Promises New Tools and Services

After publishing their roadmap last year in November and making it easier to download Ubuntu for Raspberry Pi in early February 2020, Canonical keeps on its promise to fully support Raspberry Pi devices for its Ubuntu Linux operating system with a plethora of upcoming goodies. First and foremost, the company behind Ubuntu added support for the latest Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) release for 32-bit Raspberry Pi 2, 3 and 4 models, as well as Compute Modules, and 64-bit Raspberry Pi 3 and 4 models. Read more

Telegram Desktop 2.0 Release Adds Chat Folders, New Animated Emoji

Telegram Desktop 2.0 arrives five months after the 1.9 series and more than three years after the 1.0 milestone. As expected, this is major update and introduces several new features. One of the biggest new feature of the Telegram Desktop 2.0 release include the ability to organize your chats into so-called “Chat Folders” whenever you think you have too many chats opened. Another interesting feature is support for creating custom folders with flexible settings. In addition, the client now also lets users use default recommendations when creating custom folders. Read more

Android Leftovers