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Wednesday, 08 Apr 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Devices: Rockchip, Olimex, DragonBoard and Axiomtek

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

LibreOffice: LibreOffice Macro Team, Writer and Impress

Filed under
LibO
  • LibreOffice Macro Team: progress report

    Macros help users to automate common tasks in LibreOffice. In September 2019 we announced a new team in our community to work on macro support. A progress report was published in November 2019, so let’s review everything that happened since then.

    If you are interested in contributing to the macro team (development, testing or documentation), we’d love to hear from you – please send an email to ilmari.lauhakangas@libreoffice.org and we’ll get in touch.

  • Padded numbering in Writer, part 2

    I already posted about the start of padded numbering support in Writer, there the focus was to insert 0 characters to pad up the result to 2 characters. Let’s see how that got extended in the recent past…

    First, thanks Nicolas Christener who made this work by Collabora possible.

  • Presentation templates for Impress

    Possibly you search some nice presentation templates for LibreOffice Impress, because in-build templates aren't good for you?

Rugged, Linux-driven IoT gateways are optimized for sensor monitoring

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Neousys’ IGT-33V and IGT-34C gateways run Debian on a TI AM3352 and offer PoE+ PD, isolated DIO, and 8x 0-10V (33V) or 4x 4-20mA (34C) analog inputs. They follow similar IGT30 and IGT-31D models that focus on digital outputs.

We missed Neousys’ January announcement of its IGT30 and IGT-31D IoT gateways, both of which run a Debian 9 Linux stack on a Texas Instruments Sitara AM3352 SoC. Now, the company has followed up with similar IGT-33V and IGT-34C models. The rugged new DIN-rail systems specialize in analog inputs and digital outputs compared to the earlier digital input focused models. All four IGT-30 series models, which are aimed primarily at sensor monitoring, among other industrial IoT applications, are covered below.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 2020-04-08 | Linux Headlines

    The GNOME Foundation and Endless launch a new contest aimed at engaging young coders with FOSS, Tails 4.5 brings support for UEFI Secure Boot, the first release of Krustlet brings WebAssembly to Kubernetes, and Qt considers further limiting access to its releases.

  • People of WordPress: Mario Peshev

    Mahttps://wordpress.org/news/2020/04/people-of-wordpress-mario-peshev/rio has been hooked on computers ever since he got his first one in 1996. He started with digging into MS-DOS and Windows 3.1 first and learned tons by trial and error. Following that adventure, Mario built his first HTML site in 1999. He found development so exciting that he spent day and night learning QBasic and started working at the local PC game club. Mario got involved with several other things related to website administration (translating security bulletins, setting up simple sites, etc) and soon found the technology field was full of activities he really enjoyed.

    [...]

    For Mario, one of the key selling points of WordPress was the international openness. He had previously been involved with other open source communities, some of which were US-focused. He felt they were more reliant on meeting people in person. With events only taking place in the US, this made building relationships much harder for people living in other countries.

    While the WordPress project started out in the US, the WordPress community quickly globalized. Dozens of WordCamps and hundreds of Meetup events take place around the globe every year. All of these events bring a wide variety of people sharing their enthusiasm for WordPress together.

    For Mario, the birth of WordCamp Europe was something magical. The fact that hundreds, and later on thousands, of people from all over the world gathered around the topic of WordPress speaks for itself. Mario has been involved with organizing WordCamp Europe twice (in 2014 and 2015).

  • FINOS Joins Linux Foundation [Ed: For the second time in two days, the "Linux" Foundation announces backing a non-Linux OS (seL4 and now FINOS), this time it's announced by "Editorial Director, Project Insights at Linux Foundation" who came from Microsoft (yes, Mircrosofters run and speak for the Linux Foundation now)]

    During the 1960s and 1970’s, software developers typically used monolithic architectures on mainframes and minicomputers for software development, and no single application was able to satisfy the needs of most end-users. Vertical industries used software with a smaller code footprint with simpler interfaces to other applications, and scalability was not a priority at the time.

    With the rise and development of the Internet, developers gradually separated the service layer from these monolithic architectures, followed by RPC and then Client/Server.

    But existing architectures were unable to keep up with the needs of larger enterprises and exploding data traffic. Beginning in the middle of the 1990s, distributed architectures began to rise in popularity, with service-oriented architectures (known as SOA) becoming increasingly dominant.

    [...]

    Today, on March 10th, 2020, The Linux Foundation is excited to announce that the TARS project has transitioned into the TARS Foundation. The TARS Foundation is an open source microservice foundation to support the rapid growth of contributions and membership for a community focused on building an open microservices platform.

  • Microsoft Buys Corp.com So Bad Guys Can’t

    Wisconsin native Mike O’Connor, who bought corp.com 26 years ago but has done very little with it since, said he hoped Microsoft would buy it because hundreds of thousands of confused Windows PCs are constantly trying to share sensitive data with corp.com. Also, early versions of Windows actually encouraged the adoption of insecure settings that made it more likely Windows computers might try to share sensitive data with corp.com.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Bootlin toolchains updated, edition 2020.02

    Bootlin provides a large number of ready-to-use pre-built cross-compilation toolchains at toolchains.bootlin.com. We announced the service in June 2017, and released multiple versions of the toolchains up to 2018.11.

    After a long pause, we are happy to announce that we have released a new set of toolchains, built using Buildroot 2020.02, and therefore labelled as 2020.02, even though they have been published in April. They are available for 38 CPU architectures or architecture variants, supporting the glibc, uclibc-ng and musl C libraries when possible.

    For each toolchain, we offer two variants: one called stable which uses “proven” versions of gcc, binutils and gdb, and one called bleeding edge which uses the latest version of gcc, binutils and gdb.

  • Squeezing the most out of the server: Erlang Profiling

    An obvious way to reduce costs is to make the system more efficient and this means entering the hazardous land of software optimization. Even for experienced programmers, identifying bottlenecks is a hard enough problem when using the right tools; trying to guess what could make the code run faster will not only waste time but is likely to introduce unnecessary complexity that can cause problems down the line. The cousin of premature optimization is necessary optimization without profiling first

    While Erlang is famously known for its concurrency model and fault-tolerant design, one of its biggest strengths is the level of live inspection and tuning it offers, often with little or no setup and runtime cost. In this article, we outline how we leverage those features to profile our system, driving the optimizations that can lead to cost reductions.

  • S. Lott: Why Isn't COBOL Dead? Or Why Didn't It Evolve?

    In short, why is FORTRAN still OK? Why is COBOL not still OK?

    Actually, I'd venture to say the stories of these languages are essentially identical. They're both used because they have significant legacy implementations.

    There's a distinction, that I think might be relevant to the "revulsion factor."

    Folks don't find Fortran quite so revolting because it's sequestered into libraries where we don't really have to look at it. It's often wrapped into SciPy. The GCC compiler system handles it and we're happy.

    COBOL, however, isn't sequestered into libraries with tidy Python wrappers and Conda installers. COBOL is the engine of enterprise applications.

    Also. COBOL is used by organizations that suffer from high amounts of technical inertia, which makes the language a kind of bellwether for the rest of the organization. The organization changes slowly (or not at all) and the language changes at an even more tectonic pace.

    This is a consequence of very large organizations with regulatory advantages. Governments, for example, regulate themselves into permanence. Other highly-regulated industries like banks and insurance companies can move slowly and tolerate the stickiness of COBOL.

  • Google's Propeller Is Beginning To Be Upstreamed For Spinning Faster Program Binaries

    We have begun seeing the start of upstreaming on Google's Propeller Framework for offering post-link-time binary optimizations in the LLVM compiler stack to offer measurably faster (re)generated binaries.

    Propeller was developed by Google engineers as a result of Facebook's BOLT post-link optimizer for speeding up applications by optimizing the generated binary after being linked.

  • 5 tips for working from home from a veteran remotee

    Due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and its rapid development, we are all being called to take protective and preventative measures, including avoiding social contact as much as possible. Events are canceled, trips are postponed, and companies are asking their employees to work from home. It's an exceptional situation for everyone, as remote work cultures with distributed teams are being introduced overnight. Many companies are being challenged to quickly organize a team that works completely remotely.

    Many articles and recommendations on remote work, home offices, and teleworking are circulating. For example, GitLab, a pioneer in remote work, has recently published a detailed manual on remote working. I highly recommend it to anyone who is facing the challenge of setting up and managing a remote team. At OpenProject, we have been working in distributed teams for over 10 years.

  • Love or hate chat? 4 best practices for remote teams

    I encourage you to explore open source alternatives to chat like Mattermost, Rocket.Chat, and Riot.

  • Create web tutorials with Reveal.js and Git

    Whether you're a learner or a teacher, you probably recognize the value of online workshops set up like slideshows for communicating knowledge. If you've ever stumbled upon one of these well-organized tutorials that are set up page by page, chapter by chapter, you may have wondered how hard it was to create such a website.

    Well, I'm here to show you how easy it is to generate this type of workshop using a fully automated process.

  • Three Comics For Understanding Unix Shell

    I just optimized Oil's runtime by reducing the number of processes that it starts. Surprisingly, you can implement shell features like pipelines and subshells with more than one "process topology".

    I described these optimizations on Zulip, and I want to write a post called Oil Starts Fewer Processes Than Other Shells.

    That post feels dense, so let's first review some background knowledge, with the help of several great drawings from Julia Evans.

  • Targeted string replacements with sed and AWK

    Global replacement of A with B with sed or AWK might be a mistake unless you're 100% sure that you really, truly want to replace every instance of A with B in the data file. Even more risky (says he, who has done it more than once to his regret) is globally replacing over a whole set of files:

  • Robotic Process Automation (RPA): 6 open source tools

    As with many new software implementations, there’s a build-or-buy choice when getting started with Robotic Process Automation (RPA).

    On the build side, you can write your own bots from scratch, provided you’ve got the right people and budget in place. On the buy side, there’s a burgeoning marketplace of commercial software vendors offering RPA in various flavors, as well as overlapping technologies. (Some market themselves under different but related terms like “intelligent automation.”)

  • Things that are called ML/AI that really aren’t

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a genuine technical term to describe something that doesn’t quite yet exist in a truly cognitive form. However, AI is also a marketing buzzword used to distinguish items with extra usability or computing-power oompfh. The acronym often attempts to differentiate ordinary things, such as phones, from extraordinary things of the same ilk, such smartphones.

    Because there’s no legal governance over the use of AI in marketing, the label is abundantly applied to hardware or software use traditional algorithms as well as to things that actually learn. Calling all these things “smart” muddies the waters even more – and makes it difficult to make rational decisions.

    “Many times companies use the term ‘artificial intelligence’ to describe technology that operates without human interaction, but most times it’s just a sophisticated algorithm,” says Scott George, CEO of U.S. Consumer Healthcare Advocacy Group (USCHAG), a consortium of healthcare professionals, institutions, and organizations. He cites website chatbots as an example, which some consider AI – but usually don’t meet the technical criteria.

    “The confusion here is that for something to qualify as AI doesn’t actually require it to have an advanced form of cognition,” says Benjamin Nussbaum, AI/ML advisor to the Greystones Group, a technical support provider for the Department of Defense (DoD) and commercial clients. So many companies can tout what they do as AI is because the definition of AI was established back in the 1950s and only requires that a machine can do as well or better that which a human can do. “This opens the door for basic automation, analysis algorithms, etc. to all be categorized as AI,” adds Nussbaum.

    Naturally, that is extremely confusing for anyone who wants to assess any system’s value. The average algorithm is so sophisticated today that spotting the difference can be nearly impossible for the average buyer.

    The solution is to look at the system’s value without regard to how it’s built. If it genuinely uses AI or machine learning, great; but what matters is whether it makes life better.

  • An existential threat (that isn't COVID-19)

    Many of you will know my good friend Peter Scott as a Perl luminary. More recently he has turned his attention and his considerable talents to focus on the future of AI, both as an unprecedented opportunity for our society...and as an unprecedented threat to our species.

    A few years back, he released an excellent book on the subject, and just recently he was invited to speak on the subject at TEDx. His talk brilliantly sums up both the extraordinary possibilities and the terrible risks inherent in turning over our decision-making to systems whose capacities are increasingly growing beyond our own abilities, and perhaps soon beyond even our own understanding.

Red Hat Summit and License Track at FOSS-North

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS
Legal
  • A partner’s guide to the Red Hat Summit virtual experience

    Partners play a critical role in Red Hat’s efforts to drive innovation with enterprise open source technology. From OEMs to global systems integrators to cloud and service providers, Red Hat’s extensive partner ecosystem helps customers around the world achieve success and IT modernization. We appreciate our partners and look forward to showcasing their innovative work at the first-ever Red Hat Summit Virtual Experience, a free, immersive multi-day event.

    If you’re a partner participating in Red Hat Summit, you won’t want to miss any of the action. Here are a few insider tips and tricks to help you navigate our newly virtual event.

  • What a License Track!

    This year we had a great set of licensing related talks, and I’d like to discuss them all in this post.

    Monday morning started with Frank Karlitschek and his talk Why the GPL is great for business. This a great overview of how you can build an free and open source business – pros and cons and pitfalls to avoid.

Canonical on NFV and Wellcome Sanger Institute

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Simplify NFV adoption – Charmed OSM and Managed Apps

    Charmed OSM and Managed Apps let telecom operators accelerate adoption of NFV. This is needed because the way we consume data has changed. We want data at a cheaper price with faster speeds and in larger quantities. To meet the challenge, telecom operators are changing the underlying network infrastructure that delivers data. Software-defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualisation (NFV) are enabling this by lowering costs and improving infrastructure flexibility. But how can telecom operators make sure their deployment of NFV is successful? How can they deploy faster and with less risk?

    Last week Canonical announced Managed Apps – a managed service that lets enterprises have their apps deployed and operated by Canonical. One of the ten apps that Managed Apps launched with, was Open Source MANO (OSM) – the NFV management and orchestration stack. Let’s look at what OSM is, how Managed Apps for Charmed OSM works and why you should use it. For a detailed understanding, sign up to this webinar on the benefits of Managed Apps.

  • The Wellcome Sanger Institute: sharing genomic research worldwide securely with supported Ceph

    A world-leading genomic research centre, the Wellcome Sanger Institute uses advanced DNA sequencing technology for large-scale studies that surpass the capabilities of many other organisations. Among other works, the Institute is currently heading the UK-wide Darwin Tree of Life Project to map the genetic code of 60,000 complex species. It is also working with expert groups across Britain to analyse the genetic code of COVID-19 samples, helping public health agencies to combat this now widespread virus.

    For advanced research, genomic scientists need to use and access a vast amount of data. They then need to be able to share this data with other scientists worldwide in a secure and reliable manner. To meet this data storage and retrieval challenge, the Institute opted for Ceph on Ubuntu as an on-premise solution offering superior robustness and scalability. Authorised users internal and external to the Institute can store and retrieve any volume of data from any location via the S3 protocol.

    [...]

    With the IT infrastructure at the Wellcome Sanger Institute a key factor in pushing back the boundaries of science, Dr Peter Clapham, Informatics Support Group Team Leader says, “With Canonical, we have a platform in place for meeting leading edge requirements, ensuring resilience, and making sure that as it grows, the Institute has a provider that can grow with it and its support needs.” He adds, “We’ve engaged with Canonical for the confidence that we’re not just meeting challenges from today, but that we’re also looking to the future and the continuity of our technical solutions.”

Mapzen open-source mapping project revived under the Urban Computing Foundation

Filed under
OSS

The Mapzen open-source mapping platform has a hard history. On the one hand, Mapzen is used by over 70,000 developers and it's the backbone of such mapping services as OpenStreetMap, Remix, and Carto. But, as a business, Mapzen failed in 2018. Mapzen's code and service lived on as a Linux Foundation Project.

Now, it's moved on to the Urban Computing Foundation (UCF), another Linux Foundation group with more resources. UCF is devoted to helping create smarter cities, multimodal transportation, and autonomous vehicles.

Read more

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • SUSE Cloud Application Platform Air gapped installation

    Containers has become first choice and ask from customers and Kubernetes is the first choice for container orchestration. Cloud native applications are being built. SUSE Cloud Application Platform is a modern application delivery platform used to bring an advance cloud native developer experience to Kubernetes. SUSE has containerized Cloud foundry.

    Container images being downloaded on Kubernetes master and worker nodes when we deploy SUSE Cloud Application Platform. Source of these container images can be SUSE registry site which is registry.suse.com or can be a local registry in the same network of Kubernetes master and worker nodes.

  • SUSE Home Office Workplace: Our offering for your business continuity strategy

    Providing employees in the home office with secure and reliable access to their business-critical applications – that is currently the big challenge for companies. Hardware bottlenecks, limited budgets and enormous time pressure make the implementation of emergency plans more difficult in many organizations. To help you work from home, we offer a cost-effective business continuity solution that you can implement quickly and easily: the SUSE Home Office Workplace.

  • SUSE Manager 4: The Smart Choice for Managing Linux

    “Only SUSE Manager combines software content lifecycle management (CLM) with a centrally staged repository and class-leading configuration management and automation, plus optional state of the art monitoring capabilities, for all major Linux distributions.”

    These days, IT departments manage highly dynamic and heterogeneous networks under constantly changing requirements. One important trend that has contributed to the growing complexity is the rise of software-defined infrastructures (SDIs). An SDI consists of a single pool of virtual resources that system administrators can manage efficiently and always in the same way, regardless of whether the resources reside on premise or in the cloud. SUSE Manager is a powerful tool that brings the promise of SDI to Linux server management.

    You can use SUSE Manager to manage a diverse pool of Linux systems through their complete lifecycle, including deployment, configuration, auditing and software management. This paper highlights some of the benefits of SUSE Manager and describes how SUSE Manager stacks up against other open source management solutions.

  • Automating the SAP HANA High Availability Cluster Deployment for Microsoft Azure

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Boeing Finds New Software Flaws on 737 Max

    The new flaws deepen the engineering challenge for Boeing as it tries to return its best-selling jet to the skies. One of the problems involves “hypothetical faults” in the computer’s microprocessor, which could lead the plane to climb or dive on its own, Boeing said. A safety system on the Max caused the jet to dive automatically in both accidents, but the problems aren’t related, Boeing said.

    The other newly revealed fault could potentially cause the autopilot to disengage as the aircraft prepares to land. Neither problem has been observed in flight, but the software changes will eliminate the possibility that they could occur, the company said. The modifications can be incorporated into the plane at the same time.

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (firefox), Debian (chromium and firefox-esr), Oracle (ipmitool and telnet), Red Hat (firefox and qemu-kvm), Scientific Linux (firefox, krb5-appl, and qemu-kvm), Slackware (firefox), SUSE (gmp, gnutls, libnettle and runc), and Ubuntu (firefox, gnutls28, linux-aws, linux-aws-hwe, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-gke-4.15, linux-kvm, linux-oem, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, and linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-gke-5.0, linux-oem-osp1, linux-oracle-5.0).

  • Linux Security Feature Revised For Randomizing The Kernel Stack Offset At Each System Call

    Patches have been revised for allowing Linux to support kernel stack base address offset randomization for each system call.

    This feature is designed for preventing various stack-based attacks that rely upon a known layout of the stack structure. With these patches and enabling the feature, the stack offset would be randomized on each system call so the layout changes for each syscall.

    The PaX/GrSecurity folks previously implemented a "RANDKSTACK" feature for which this upstream work is based on their idea but with a different implementation approach.

Nvidia 440.82 Linux Graphics Driver Adds Linux Kernel 5.6 Support

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

For all supported systems (Linux, BSD and Solaris), the Nvidia 440.82 graphics driver brings support for presenting from queue families that only expose the VK_QUEUE_COMPUTE_BIT Vulkan extension when XCB is being used in addition to the Xlib surfaces.

For GNU/Linux systems, Nvidia 440.82 adds a workaround to make the DOOM Eternal video game work via Steam Play. The fix actually overrides app-requested memory locations, thus making sure performance-critical resources are placed in video memory.

Read more

Staying "safe" while you stream: DBD's tips on living DRM-free during quarantine

Filed under
GNU
Web

As most of us are cooped up in our homes due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it's somewhat natural that we turn to online movies, music, and other media to help pass the time. For most people, this involves turning to Internet streaming for convenient, "all-in-one" services that promise an endless array of recommendations to while away the hours. "Binging" is all well and good every once in a while, but we should remain careful that the ways we're getting our media don't come with compromises to our freedom. As we've mentioned before, Netflix and other giant media providers are responsible for keeping the practice of DRM (Digital Restrictions Management) alive, and it's important not to provide them with the subscription fees they need to keep going. It's also important, even under less dire circumstances, to support businesses and Web sites that provide DRM-free media, and to promote them to our friends. So to help provide you with a plethora of DRM-free and often gratis places to stream from while keeping your rights, here's a few choice selections from our Guide to DRM-free Living.

When it comes to finding good videos to watch during times of crisis, we'd be remiss if we didn't mention the Internet Archive. This section of the digital library contains bona-fide cinematic masterpieces like Nosferatu, as well as "classics" of a different sort like Plan 9 from Outer Space. Many of these works have been voluntarily uploaded to the Archive by their creators, or, like Night of the Living Dead, have fallen into the public domain due to some of the vagaries and finer points in United States copyright law.

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Signage SBC showcases hexa-core S922X

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

Shenzhen Tomato’s “XYT-6689” SBC runs Android 9.0 on a 2GHz hexa-core -A73 and -A53 Amlogic S922X with up to 4GB RAM and 64GB eMMC. Display interfaces including HDMI 2.1, LVDS, eDP, and V-by-One.

Shenzhen Tomato has posted a product page for a signage-oriented XYT-6689 (Amlogic S922X Digital Signage) SBC that runs Android 9.0 on Amlogic’s S922X. The only other S922X-based SBC we’ve seen is Hardkernel’s community-backed Odroid-N2, which supports it with Ubuntu 18.04 in addition to Android 9. The unpriced XYT-6689 is designed for digital signage, intelligent display terminal equipment, industrial automation terminals, and gaming and AI computers.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to configure a print server with Ubuntu Server, CUPS, and Bonjour

    You probably have a few Linux machines in your data center that have a few CPU cycles to spare. Why not make use of them for a printer server? After all, most businesses still rely on printing for certain departments. When your business is large enough to require a print server, you might as well go with a tried and true system: Linux.

  • A “Hello World” virtual machine running the Hurd

    There’s been a bit of speculation as to whether our April 1st post was a joke. Part of it was a joke: we’re not deprecating Linux-libre, fear not! But when we published it, it was already April 2nd in Eastern parts of the world and thus, not surprisingly, the remainder of the post was less of a joke.

  • Reviewing Docker Logs

    Many of you know that it's possible to access Docker container logs using "docker logs" command. But fewer people know that it's possible to follow logs stream for new messages (like tail -f), and even fewer yet are aware that it's possible to specify timestamps of the period you want to review – showing only specific logs during that period.

  • 7 echo command uses in Linux with examples

    Echo command outputs strings that are passed as arguments and usually used in shell scripts and batch files to output status text to a screen or as a source part of a pipeline. Syntax: echo [-n] [string ...] Let's learn its usage in Linux with practical examples in today's session of Terminal Tuts.

  • 4 Methods to Setup and Use a VPN

    4 Methods to Setup and Use a VPN Let's go over the setup and usage of VPNs as they are the best method to work from home. I have set up several VPNs over the past couple of weeks and here are a few of the methods I have used.

  • Linux system housekeeping 101: Managing file storage

    One of your many duties as a system administrator is the often daunting task of keeping your system's filesystems clear of clutter. It's not an easy task, is it? This first article in a short housekeeping series explores some basic system housekeeping concepts that will keep your systems healthy and your users responsible.

  • How to Take Screenshots without Shadows in KDE

    KDE’s desktop effects are fantastic, except when taking screenshots for use on your site or blog. Great-looking shadows around every desktop element are captured as well and can end up conflicting with your site or blog’s theme. Most screenshot tools insist on capturing them, and the option they offer to disable decorations can also change how windows look. The only solution seems to be to capture a rectangular area and then manually define the region of each screenshot or maybe to edit each screenshot afterward in something like GIMP.

  • How to Install Shutter Screenshot Tool in Ubuntu 20.04

    This quick tutorial shows how to install Shutter, one of the most popular screenshot applications for Linux desktop, in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

    Shutter is removed from the main Ubuntu repositories since Ubuntu 18.10, along with some old Gnome libraries required by the screenshot tool. It is however can be easily installed via the community maintained PPA repository in Ubuntu 19.10, Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How To: Recover Deleted Files With PhotoRec

    If you find yourself here reading this article, it probably means something has gone terribly wrong. Take a deep breath, we’re going to get through this. Buried in the depths of the Google search results for “deleted file recovery,” past the very aggressive SEO results of various companies trying to get you to buy their software, lies a result for one of my favorite pieces of free open-source software, PhotoRec. It is a companion program to TestDisk, another piece of wonderful open-source software, created by CGSecurity under the GNU General Public License. In this guide, we will go through the relatively painless process of recovering deleted files with PhotoRec. These tools are especially useful for recovering files from portable flash media used with digital cameras.

  • emacs and uemacs

Software: PeaZip, GIMP, Chrome, YADM and Homeshick

Filed under
Software
  • PeaZip 7.2.0

    Open and extract 180+ archive formats: 001, 7Z, ACE(*), ARC, ARJ, BZ2, CAB, DMG, GZ, ISO, LHA, PAQ, PEA, RAR, TAR, UDF, WIM, XZ, ZIP ZIPX - view full list of supported archive file formats for archiving and for extraction.

  • Photo software options [Ed: GIMP (the GNU Image Manipulation Program) listed under "Freeware" (which is wrong)]

    GIMP (the GNU Image Manipulation Program) is an open source program that has been around since the mid-to-late 1990s so there’s been plenty of time to refine it. Available for the Linux, Mac OS X and Windows platforms it provides most of the same features as Adobe’s Photoshop and its user interface is highly customisable. It also supports many of the plugins offered by third-party developers.

  • Google Chrome 81 Now Available for Download on Linux, Windows, and Mac

    Google has just released Chrome 81 on all supported platforms, including Linux, Windows, and Mac.

    The new version is 81.0.4044.92, and it includes several notable improvements, including support for the Web NFC API, which means that web apps can finally use the built-in NFC.

    In other words, if your device is bundled with an NFC, web apps can use it though Google Chrome, either for data transfer or for other implementations.

    Google says it has resolves a total of 32 security vulnerabilities with this release, with the company once again paying thousands of dollars in bounties to researchers who reported the flaws.

  • It's all in the dot file - YADM and Homeshick

    Backups are important. Backups are crucial. Backups are love, backups are life. Over the years, I've talked about the cardinal value of keeping your data safe, and that means multiple copies, multiple locations. We also talked about how to concoct your own quick 'n' dirty setup with tar and gpg recently. That one covers both data and application settings. Speaking of the latter ...

    Let's expand on this some more. If you have multiple computers, reinstall systems frequently, or just like to have a consistent configuration across multiple hosts, you might be interested in a way to manage application settings. In Linux, most software keeps their configurations in hidden files inside the home directory, either at the top level (/home/username) or inside the .config sub-directory. Either way, there could be plenty of them, you want to make sure you always have a copy, and if something goes wrong, you can easily revert to a good checkpoint. Introducting YADM and Homeshick.

Qt and KDE Development

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • New Qt Releases Might Now Be Restricted To Paying Customers For 12 Months

    With an apparent blame on the novel coronavirus, The Qt Company is said to be considering restricting new Qt releases to paying customers for a period of twelve months in an effort to boost their near-term finances.

    Earlier today The Qt Company published a 2020 Qt road-map while following that a Phoronix reader tipped us off to the latest discussions between KDE, the Qt project, and The Qt Company.

    KDE and the open-source Qt folks have been in discussions with The Qt Company especially with the restrictions announced back in January by The Qt Company that LTS point releases might only be available to commercial customers, Qt Accounts being needed for binary package downloads, etc.

  • Qt, Open Source and corona
    Dear KDE community,
    
    the relationship between the KDE community, the Qt project and The Qt Company 
    has always been close and beneficial for all three.
    
    * The Qt Company benefits from having a large and healthy community of 
    contributors, developers and experts around their product.
    * KDE benefits from being able to use Qt and to contribute directly to Qt.
    * The Qt project benefits from having the company as a steward and very large 
    contributor, and having KDE as a large and well-known sub-community.
    
    Last December, I published a document explaining the win-win-win-relationship: 
    http://www.olafsw.de/a-better-qt-because-of-open-source-and-kde/
    
    
    Unfortunately, The Qt Company is currently considering to stop this healthy 
    cooperation.
    
    Fortunately, the KDE Free Qt Foundation exists, which secures the continued 
    existence of Open Source Qt:
    https://kde.org/community/whatiskde/kdefreeqtfoundation.php
    Together with Martin Konold, I represent KDE in the board of the foundation.
    
    
    I will now give you a bit of background information.
    
    During the past two years, there have been negotiations between The Qt Company 
    and the KDE Free Qt Foundation for updating the contract.
    
    Our goals in negotiations:
    * helping the company increase their revenue without harming the Qt project or 
    the KDE community
    * strengthening the protection of the Qt project and of the KDE community
    * avoiding a parting of ways between The Qt Company and the Qt+KDE communities
    
    Concrete areas included in the negotiations are:
    
    * Fixing the incompatibility between paid Qt license terms and using or 
    contributing to Open Source
    (“Prohibited Combination” in https://www.qt.io/terms-conditions/ )
    * Fixing the license incompatibility between the Qt Design Studio (which is 
    only partly Free Software) and our existing contract with the company
    * Making our contract with the company stronger, requiring them to make 
    immediate Free Software releases of Qt (currently, they are allowed to delay 
    by 12 months) to ensure the availability of LTS security fixes for KDE
    * Updating our contract to include Wayland
    * Evaluating contract changes suggested by the company aimed at making the Qt 
    business more profitable, for example the option of selling bundles of Qt with 
    other software, or making integrations with proprietary third-party software 
    possible
    
    
    One setback in the negotiations has been an announcement of The Qt Company in 
    January: https://www.qt.io/blog/qt-offering-changes-2020
    They announced that LTS releases of Qt will only be available for paid license 
    holders. It is still unclear what this implies for contributions to Qt and for 
    the sharing of security fixes between the various parties (including The Qt 
    Company, the many Qt experts contributing, the KDE community, and Linux 
    distributions).
    
    At an in-person meeting in Frankfurt on March 6, we nevertheless managed to 
    lay the groundwork for a possible path forward, continuing with an approach 
    beneficial to all sides.
    
    
    But last week, the company suddenly informed both the KDE e.V. board and the 
    KDE Free QT Foundation that the economic outlook caused by the Corona virus 
    puts more pressure on them to increase short-term revenue. As a result, they 
    are thinking about restricting ALL Qt releases to paid license holders for the 
    first 12 months. They are aware that this would mean the end of contributions 
    via Open Governance in practice.
    
    Obviously, it cannot be in the middle- and long-term health of The Qt Company 
    to separate itself from the very strong Qt + KDE communities.
    
    We hope The Qt Company will reconsider. However, this threat to the Open 
    Source community needs to be anticipated, so that the Qt and KDE communities 
    can prepare themselves.
    
    The Qt Company says that they are willing to reconsider the approach only if 
    we offer them concessions in other areas. I am reminded, however, of the 
    situation half a year ago. We had discussed an approach for contract updates, 
    which they suddenly threw away by restricting LTS releases of Qt instead.
    
    
    What does this mean for the future of Qt and for the future of KDE?
    
    All software changes in Qt will still be available at as Open Source as 
    required by our contract – maybe with a delay of 12 months if the company 
    decides to part ways with the communities.
    
    We will continue to work on a contract update that helps all sides. But even 
    if these negotiations were to be unilaterally stopped by The Qt Company, Qt 
    will stay Open Source, and KDE will be able to use it. I am also absolutely 
    sure that the Qt + KDE communities will continue cooperation on new features, 
    bug fixes, and security fixes, even should The Qt Company decide to forgo the 
    benefits of cooperation.
    
    I invite The Qt Company to stay with us. It will be worthwhile.
    
    
    Best regards,
    
    Olaf
    
    
  • Learn PyQt: Packaging PyQt5 & PySide2 applications for Windows, with PyInstaller

    There is not much fun in creating your own desktop applications if you can't share them with other people — whether than means publishing it commercially, sharing it online or just giving it to someone you know. Sharing your apps allows other people to benefit from your hard work!

    The good news is there are tools available to help you do just that with your Python applications which work well with apps built using Qt5. In this tutorial we'll look at the most popular tool for packaging Python applications: PyInstaller.

    This tutorial is broken down into a series of steps, using PyInstaller to build first simple, and then increasingly complex PyQt5 applications into distributable EXE files on Windows. You can choose to follow it through completely, or skip ahead to the examples that are most relevant to your own project.

  • Virtual KDE PIM Sprint April 2020

    Last weekend would have been the traditional annual KDE PIM meeting in Toulouse, but with travel being largely shut down in Europe we had to do this virtually. That meant missing out on the culinary treats of being in France, but we got a few things done nevertheless.

    [...]

    Nico has been working on this, eventually enabling platform calendar abstraction behind the KCalendarCore API. So the same application code could be using a calendar from Akonadi on a desktop system and the Android calendar on a phone.

    We hopefully managed to sort out the remaining conceptual questions for this (modeling hierarchies, lazy population of expensive calendars, separate classes for the calendar metadata or not).

    Moving PIM modules to KDE Frameworks

    KDAV is nearing completion for transitioning to Frameworks after the 20.04 release (so in May or June). A final review pass resulted in a few more improvements and API cleanups.

    Following KDAV the possible candidates are the KGAPI library, which is already used externally and thus would benefit most, as well as the various email frameworks (MIME, IMAP, SMTP).

Graphics: TURNIP, AMD and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • TURNIP Vulkan Driver Lands Initial Geometry Shader Support

    The TURNIP open-source Vulkan driver continues advancing in-step with the other Mesa drivers.

    TURNIP is the open-source Vulkan driver for Qualcomm Adreno graphics hardware and developed by the same crew as the well known Freedreno. For a while after initially being merged to Mesa just over one year ago, there wasn't much progress to report but recently the involved developers at Google and elsewhere have been picking up work on this Qualcomm Vulkan driver option.

  • AMD Rebases Their OpenMP For Radeon GPUs Against LLVM 11

    At the end of last year with ROCm 3.0 AMD introduced the AOMP compiler for OpenMP support targeting Radeon GPUs. AOMP is another downstream of LLVM Clang and on Tuesday marked the latest update.

    AOMP so far has been developed independently of the LLVM Clang code-base and it remains to be seen any mainlining plans they have of getting this OpenMP offloading for Radeon GPUs upstream. Following their AOMP update in March they have now announced AOMP Release 11.0-1.

  • AMD ACO Begins Using Navi NGG For Tessellation + Vertex Shaders

    The AMD "ACO" compiler backed by Valve for offering a faster shader compiler back-end than AMDGPU LLVM for the RADV open-source Radeon Vulkan driver has begun making use of Navi's NGG "Next-Gen Geometry" hardware.

    It has been a slow path for the open-source OpenGL/Vulkan drivers to make use of NGG as found with the Navi/GFX10 hardware (sans Navi 14 being borked). There have been bugs to deal with and other obstacles in supporting this engine designed to offer faster geometry performance.

  • Vulkan 1.2.137 Specification Brings Many Clarifications + Fixes, Faster HTML Doc Loading

    Less than one month ago came the big Vulkan 1.2.135 update with official ray-tracing capabilities and other extension promotions. Out today is Vulkan 1.2.137 with a whole lot of clarifications and fixes.

    Vulkan isn't slowing down at all due to the coronavirus but its adoption continues to grow and the Vulkan working group continues delivering timely updates with new extensions and fixes/corrections.

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More in Tux Machines

Rugged, Linux-driven IoT gateways are optimized for sensor monitoring

Neousys’ IGT-33V and IGT-34C gateways run Debian on a TI AM3352 and offer PoE+ PD, isolated DIO, and 8x 0-10V (33V) or 4x 4-20mA (34C) analog inputs. They follow similar IGT30 and IGT-31D models that focus on digital outputs. We missed Neousys’ January announcement of its IGT30 and IGT-31D IoT gateways, both of which run a Debian 9 Linux stack on a Texas Instruments Sitara AM3352 SoC. Now, the company has followed up with similar IGT-33V and IGT-34C models. The rugged new DIN-rail systems specialize in analog inputs and digital outputs compared to the earlier digital input focused models. All four IGT-30 series models, which are aimed primarily at sensor monitoring, among other industrial IoT applications, are covered below. Read more

today's leftovers

  • 2020-04-08 | Linux Headlines

    The GNOME Foundation and Endless launch a new contest aimed at engaging young coders with FOSS, Tails 4.5 brings support for UEFI Secure Boot, the first release of Krustlet brings WebAssembly to Kubernetes, and Qt considers further limiting access to its releases.

  • People of WordPress: Mario Peshev

    Mahttps://wordpress.org/news/2020/04/people-of-wordpress-mario-peshev/rio has been hooked on computers ever since he got his first one in 1996. He started with digging into MS-DOS and Windows 3.1 first and learned tons by trial and error. Following that adventure, Mario built his first HTML site in 1999. He found development so exciting that he spent day and night learning QBasic and started working at the local PC game club. Mario got involved with several other things related to website administration (translating security bulletins, setting up simple sites, etc) and soon found the technology field was full of activities he really enjoyed. [...] For Mario, one of the key selling points of WordPress was the international openness. He had previously been involved with other open source communities, some of which were US-focused. He felt they were more reliant on meeting people in person. With events only taking place in the US, this made building relationships much harder for people living in other countries. While the WordPress project started out in the US, the WordPress community quickly globalized. Dozens of WordCamps and hundreds of Meetup events take place around the globe every year. All of these events bring a wide variety of people sharing their enthusiasm for WordPress together. For Mario, the birth of WordCamp Europe was something magical. The fact that hundreds, and later on thousands, of people from all over the world gathered around the topic of WordPress speaks for itself. Mario has been involved with organizing WordCamp Europe twice (in 2014 and 2015).

  • FINOS Joins Linux Foundation [Ed: For the second time in two days, the "Linux" Foundation announces backing a non-Linux OS (seL4 and now FINOS), this time it's announced by "Editorial Director, Project Insights at Linux Foundation" who came from Microsoft (yes, Mircrosofters run and speak for the Linux Foundation now)]

    During the 1960s and 1970’s, software developers typically used monolithic architectures on mainframes and minicomputers for software development, and no single application was able to satisfy the needs of most end-users. Vertical industries used software with a smaller code footprint with simpler interfaces to other applications, and scalability was not a priority at the time. With the rise and development of the Internet, developers gradually separated the service layer from these monolithic architectures, followed by RPC and then Client/Server. But existing architectures were unable to keep up with the needs of larger enterprises and exploding data traffic. Beginning in the middle of the 1990s, distributed architectures began to rise in popularity, with service-oriented architectures (known as SOA) becoming increasingly dominant. [...] Today, on March 10th, 2020, The Linux Foundation is excited to announce that the TARS project has transitioned into the TARS Foundation. The TARS Foundation is an open source microservice foundation to support the rapid growth of contributions and membership for a community focused on building an open microservices platform.

  • Microsoft Buys Corp.com So Bad Guys Can’t

    Wisconsin native Mike O’Connor, who bought corp.com 26 years ago but has done very little with it since, said he hoped Microsoft would buy it because hundreds of thousands of confused Windows PCs are constantly trying to share sensitive data with corp.com. Also, early versions of Windows actually encouraged the adoption of insecure settings that made it more likely Windows computers might try to share sensitive data with corp.com.

Programming Leftovers

  • Bootlin toolchains updated, edition 2020.02

    Bootlin provides a large number of ready-to-use pre-built cross-compilation toolchains at toolchains.bootlin.com. We announced the service in June 2017, and released multiple versions of the toolchains up to 2018.11. After a long pause, we are happy to announce that we have released a new set of toolchains, built using Buildroot 2020.02, and therefore labelled as 2020.02, even though they have been published in April. They are available for 38 CPU architectures or architecture variants, supporting the glibc, uclibc-ng and musl C libraries when possible. For each toolchain, we offer two variants: one called stable which uses “proven” versions of gcc, binutils and gdb, and one called bleeding edge which uses the latest version of gcc, binutils and gdb.

  • Squeezing the most out of the server: Erlang Profiling

    An obvious way to reduce costs is to make the system more efficient and this means entering the hazardous land of software optimization. Even for experienced programmers, identifying bottlenecks is a hard enough problem when using the right tools; trying to guess what could make the code run faster will not only waste time but is likely to introduce unnecessary complexity that can cause problems down the line. The cousin of premature optimization is necessary optimization without profiling first

    While Erlang is famously known for its concurrency model and fault-tolerant design, one of its biggest strengths is the level of live inspection and tuning it offers, often with little or no setup and runtime cost. In this article, we outline how we leverage those features to profile our system, driving the optimizations that can lead to cost reductions.

  • S. Lott: Why Isn't COBOL Dead? Or Why Didn't It Evolve?

    In short, why is FORTRAN still OK? Why is COBOL not still OK? Actually, I'd venture to say the stories of these languages are essentially identical. They're both used because they have significant legacy implementations. There's a distinction, that I think might be relevant to the "revulsion factor." Folks don't find Fortran quite so revolting because it's sequestered into libraries where we don't really have to look at it. It's often wrapped into SciPy. The GCC compiler system handles it and we're happy. COBOL, however, isn't sequestered into libraries with tidy Python wrappers and Conda installers. COBOL is the engine of enterprise applications. Also. COBOL is used by organizations that suffer from high amounts of technical inertia, which makes the language a kind of bellwether for the rest of the organization. The organization changes slowly (or not at all) and the language changes at an even more tectonic pace. This is a consequence of very large organizations with regulatory advantages. Governments, for example, regulate themselves into permanence. Other highly-regulated industries like banks and insurance companies can move slowly and tolerate the stickiness of COBOL.

  • Google's Propeller Is Beginning To Be Upstreamed For Spinning Faster Program Binaries

    We have begun seeing the start of upstreaming on Google's Propeller Framework for offering post-link-time binary optimizations in the LLVM compiler stack to offer measurably faster (re)generated binaries. Propeller was developed by Google engineers as a result of Facebook's BOLT post-link optimizer for speeding up applications by optimizing the generated binary after being linked.

  • 5 tips for working from home from a veteran remotee

    Due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and its rapid development, we are all being called to take protective and preventative measures, including avoiding social contact as much as possible. Events are canceled, trips are postponed, and companies are asking their employees to work from home. It's an exceptional situation for everyone, as remote work cultures with distributed teams are being introduced overnight. Many companies are being challenged to quickly organize a team that works completely remotely. Many articles and recommendations on remote work, home offices, and teleworking are circulating. For example, GitLab, a pioneer in remote work, has recently published a detailed manual on remote working. I highly recommend it to anyone who is facing the challenge of setting up and managing a remote team. At OpenProject, we have been working in distributed teams for over 10 years.

  • Love or hate chat? 4 best practices for remote teams

    I encourage you to explore open source alternatives to chat like Mattermost, Rocket.Chat, and Riot.

  • Create web tutorials with Reveal.js and Git

    Whether you're a learner or a teacher, you probably recognize the value of online workshops set up like slideshows for communicating knowledge. If you've ever stumbled upon one of these well-organized tutorials that are set up page by page, chapter by chapter, you may have wondered how hard it was to create such a website. Well, I'm here to show you how easy it is to generate this type of workshop using a fully automated process.

  • Three Comics For Understanding Unix Shell

    I just optimized Oil's runtime by reducing the number of processes that it starts. Surprisingly, you can implement shell features like pipelines and subshells with more than one "process topology".

    I described these optimizations on Zulip, and I want to write a post called Oil Starts Fewer Processes Than Other Shells.

    That post feels dense, so let's first review some background knowledge, with the help of several great drawings from Julia Evans.

  • Targeted string replacements with sed and AWK

    Global replacement of A with B with sed or AWK might be a mistake unless you're 100% sure that you really, truly want to replace every instance of A with B in the data file. Even more risky (says he, who has done it more than once to his regret) is globally replacing over a whole set of files:

  • Robotic Process Automation (RPA): 6 open source tools

    As with many new software implementations, there’s a build-or-buy choice when getting started with Robotic Process Automation (RPA). On the build side, you can write your own bots from scratch, provided you’ve got the right people and budget in place. On the buy side, there’s a burgeoning marketplace of commercial software vendors offering RPA in various flavors, as well as overlapping technologies. (Some market themselves under different but related terms like “intelligent automation.”)

  • Things that are called ML/AI that really aren’t

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a genuine technical term to describe something that doesn’t quite yet exist in a truly cognitive form. However, AI is also a marketing buzzword used to distinguish items with extra usability or computing-power oompfh. The acronym often attempts to differentiate ordinary things, such as phones, from extraordinary things of the same ilk, such smartphones. Because there’s no legal governance over the use of AI in marketing, the label is abundantly applied to hardware or software use traditional algorithms as well as to things that actually learn. Calling all these things “smart” muddies the waters even more – and makes it difficult to make rational decisions. “Many times companies use the term ‘artificial intelligence’ to describe technology that operates without human interaction, but most times it’s just a sophisticated algorithm,” says Scott George, CEO of U.S. Consumer Healthcare Advocacy Group (USCHAG), a consortium of healthcare professionals, institutions, and organizations. He cites website chatbots as an example, which some consider AI – but usually don’t meet the technical criteria. “The confusion here is that for something to qualify as AI doesn’t actually require it to have an advanced form of cognition,” says Benjamin Nussbaum, AI/ML advisor to the Greystones Group, a technical support provider for the Department of Defense (DoD) and commercial clients. So many companies can tout what they do as AI is because the definition of AI was established back in the 1950s and only requires that a machine can do as well or better that which a human can do. “This opens the door for basic automation, analysis algorithms, etc. to all be categorized as AI,” adds Nussbaum. Naturally, that is extremely confusing for anyone who wants to assess any system’s value. The average algorithm is so sophisticated today that spotting the difference can be nearly impossible for the average buyer. The solution is to look at the system’s value without regard to how it’s built. If it genuinely uses AI or machine learning, great; but what matters is whether it makes life better.

  • An existential threat (that isn't COVID-19)

    Many of you will know my good friend Peter Scott as a Perl luminary. More recently he has turned his attention and his considerable talents to focus on the future of AI, both as an unprecedented opportunity for our society...and as an unprecedented threat to our species. A few years back, he released an excellent book on the subject, and just recently he was invited to speak on the subject at TEDx. His talk brilliantly sums up both the extraordinary possibilities and the terrible risks inherent in turning over our decision-making to systems whose capacities are increasingly growing beyond our own abilities, and perhaps soon beyond even our own understanding.

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