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Sunday, 09 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Kernel: Belated Linux 5.8 Coverage and More Linux 5.9 Features Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2020 - 2:53am
Story Chromium/Chrome and GNU/Linux on Chromebooks Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2020 - 2:49am
Story MX Linux 19.2 KDE Edition Reaches Release Candidate, Final Release Imminent Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2020 - 2:38am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2020 - 2:27am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2020 - 2:17am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 09/08/2020 - 8:53pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 09/08/2020 - 5:26pm
Story RetroArch 1.9 Released with Many Goodies for Retro Linux Gamers Rianne Schestowitz 09/08/2020 - 5:19pm
Story KPhotoAlbum 5.7.0 out now Rianne Schestowitz 09/08/2020 - 5:17pm
Story Beelink GT-R Review – An AMD Ryzen 5 Mini PC Tested with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 20.04 Rianne Schestowitz 09/08/2020 - 5:09pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mesa To Join Other Open-Source Projects With "Main" For Primary Code Branch

    This week Mesa developers began drafting plans for transitioning their primary Git branch to "main", following the naming plans of other open-source projects using Git.

    With Git now allowing a configurable default branch and GitHub working to transition from "master" to "main" as their default Git branch name, various other open-source projects have also been working to change their default Git branch name. Most open-source projects have been settling for "main" as the best and most descriptive default branch name rather than alternatives like trunk, default, etc. Mesa developers are similarly aiming for a "main" transition.

  • Linux Weekly Roundup: Ubuntu 20.04.1, LibreOffice 7, Pinta – Aug 8, 2020

    Here’s a recap for the week in the form of weekly roundup, curated for you from the Linux and opensource world on application updates, new releases, distribution updates, major news, and upcoming trends.

    This week there has been plenty of app updates, distribution release announced. With so many moving items happening all around the Linux and the open-source world, it is not always possible to cover the updates, especially the minor releases of news.

  • How to Apply Blur Effect in Ubuntu 20.04 Gnome Desktop
  • Install latest version apache on ubuntu from source
  • Setting Up Amavis and ClamAV on Ubuntu Mail Server
  • The weekend round-up: tell us what play button you've been clicking recently

    What's that? It's the weekend? It can't be already can it? Yes. It's time for the weekend chat about what we've been playing and what you've been playing.

    There's been so many good Linux supported releases lately I've been a bit spoilt for choice including these just in the last week: DemonCrawl, UnderMine, The Battle of Polytopia, Littlewood, Monster Crown, Core Defense and Hellpoint (plus plenty more I've missed).

  • A Plague Tale: Innocence | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 20.04 | Steam Play

    A Plague Tale: Innocence running through Steam Play on Linux.

  • Recovering 2.11BSD, fighting the patches

    Well, if we have patch 195, and all 195 patches, what's the problem? Why can't you do a simple for loop and patch -R to get back to original? And for that matter, why were no copies of the original saved?

    Turns out the root of both of these problems can be summarized as 'resource shortage'. Back in the day when this was released, 100MB disks were large. The release came on 2 mag tapes that held 40MB each. Saving a copy of these required a substantial amount of space. And it was more important to have the latest release, not the original release, for running the system. It was more efficient and better anyway.

    In addition to small disk space, these small systems were connected via USENET or UUCP. These connections tended to be slow. Coupled with the small size of the storage on the PDP-11s running 2.11BSD, the patches weren't what we think of as modern patches. The patches started before the newer unified diff format was created. That format is much more efficient that the traditional context diffs. In addition, compress(1) was the only thing that could compress things, giving poor compression ratios. The UUCP transport of usenet messages also mean that the messages had to be relatively short. So, this mean that the 'patches' were really an upgrade process, that often included patches. But just as often, it included instructions like this from patch 4: [...]

  • NetBSD on the NanoPi NEO2

    The NanoPi NEO2 from FriendlyARM has been serving me well since 2018, being my test machine for OpenBSD/arm64 related things.

    As NetBSD/evbarm finally gained support for AArch64 in NetBSD 9.0, released back in February, I decided to give it a try on this device. The board only has 512MB of RAM, and this is where NetBSD really shines. Things have become a lot easier since jmcneill@ now provides bootable ARM images for a variety of devices, including the NanoPi NEO2.

  • Linux kmod tools on macOS

    First, this does not mean you can load Linux kernel modules on macOS. This port is far more boring than that.

    Recently I migrated from Travis-CI over to GitHub Actions for rpminspect. I took some time to understand how GitHub Actions worked and expanded the CI tests to run across Fedora rawhide, the latest release of Fedora, Debian Testing, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE Leap, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, CentOS 8, CentOS 7, and Arch Linux. I wanted to prove that the software was portable across different distributions, but then that had me thinking about non-Linux platforms. GitHub Actions offers macOS as a platform, so what if I built things there too?

    Gaining access to a remote macOS VM (thanks, jbair), I was able to start working on porting rpminspect. The first problem I hit was the lack of libkmod from the Linux kmod project. Makes sense that this would not exist on macOS. All rpminspect does with libkmod is open and read Linux kernel modules, so porting it to macOS is technically possible. So I decided to give that a try.

  • We may wind up significantly delaying or mostly skipping Ubuntu 20.04

    The highest priority machines to upgrade are our remaining Ubuntu 16.04 machines, which will be going out of support in April of next year. Fortunately we don't have very many of them compared to our 18.04 machines, so there is not a huge amount of work to do. Unfortunately, most of our Exim based mail machines are 16.04 and the 20.04 version of Exim is a significantly disruptive upgrade, plus a number of the remaining machines are delicate to upgrade (our Samba server, for example).

    This opens up the issue of what Ubuntu version to upgrade these 16.04 machines to. Normally we'd upgrade them to Ubuntu 20.04, but normally we'd already be running less critical machines on 20.04 and getting experience with it; this time they'd be among our first 20.04 machines. On the other side, we're already running Ubuntu 18.04 in general and in some cases running the same services on 18.04 as we currently do on 16.04 (we have a couple of 18.04 Exim machines, for example). This makes upgrading most or all of our 16.04 machines to 18.04 instead of 20.04 a reasonably attractive proposition, especially for Exim based machines. We'd have to upgrade them again in two years when 22.04 comes out and 18.04 starts going out of support, but hopefully in two years the situation will be a lot different.

  • DebConf8

    Also this is my 6th post in this series of posts about DebConfs and for the last two days for the first time I failed my plan to do one post per day. And while two days ago I still planned to catch up on this by doing more than one post in a day, I have now decided to give in to realities, which mostly translates to sudden fantastic weather in Hamburg and other summer related changes in life. So yeah, I still plan to do short posts about all the DebConfs I was lucky to attend, but there might be days without a blog post. Anyhow, Mar de la Plata.

    When we held DebConf in Argentina it was winter there, meaning locals and other folks would wear jackets, scarfs, probably gloves, while many Debian folks not so much. Andreas Tille freaked out and/or amazed local people by going swimming in the sea every morning. And when I told Stephen Gran that even I would find it a bit cold with just a tshirt he replied "na, the weather is fine, just like british summer", while it was 14 celcius and mildly raining.

    DebConf8 was the first time I've met Valessio Brito, who I had worked together since at least DebConf6. That meeting was really super nice, Valessio is such a lovely person. Back in 2008 however, there was just one problem: his spoken English was worse than his written one, and that was already hard to parse sometimes. Fast forward eleven years to Curitiba last year and boom, Valessio speaks really nice English now.

  • 9 of the Best Firefox Addons for Social Media Enthusiasts

    Are you active in social media? If you’re using the Firefox browser, there are many extensions that will save you time, connect better with your audience, and boost your overall experience. The following is our shortlisted selection of some of the best Firefox addons for social media enthusiasts. Each has been verified for delivering what it promises and is quite easy to use. 1. Facebook Container For those active on the social scene, using Facebook is easier as a login option.

    [...]

    Love them or hate them, emojis may have become the official language of the Internet. If you’re running out of emoji styles to describe a specific mood or reaction, Emoji Cheatsheet just may give you the perfect idea. The emojis you click are automatically saved to your clipboard so that you can paste it on any social media site.

  • U is for Unreliable UI (or: Why Firefox's "Do this automatically this from now on" checkbox is so flaky, and how to work around it)

    It's been a frustration with Firefox for years. You click on a link and get the "What should Firefox do with this file?" dialog, even though it's a file type you view all the time -- PDF, say, or JPEG. You click "View in browser" or "Save file" or whatever ... then you check the "Do this automatically for files like this from now on" checkbox, thinking, I'm sure I checked this last time.

    Then a few minutes later, you go to a file of the exact same time, and you get the dialog again. That damn checkbox is like the button on street crossings or elevators: a no-op to make you think you're doing something.

NanoPi and Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Hardware
  • NanoPi NEO3

    A tiny, headless SBC based on the 64-bit quad-core RockChip RK3328 SoC along with up to 2GB RAM. I/O includes GbE and 3x USB (2x 3.0 + 1x 2.0), plus a 26-pin expansion header various GPIO signals.

  • Raspberry Pi makes Japanese keyboard

    It’s quite a complex keyboard, with three different character sets to deal with.

    ‘Figuring out how the USB keyboard controller maps to all the special keys on a Japanese keyboard was particularly challenging, with most web searches leading to non-English websites,’ say the Pi people, ‘we ended up reverse-engineering generic Japanese keyboards to see how they work, and mapping the keycodes to key matrix locations. We are fortunate that we have a very patient keyboard IC vendor, called Holtek, which produces the custom firmware for the controller.’

  • Raspberry Pi Release Japanese Keyboard Variant

    The Japanese keyboard is the latest layout available. Last month we saw the release of Swedish, Portuguese, Danish and Norwegian layouts of the official keyboard. All of the keyboards come with three USB 2.0 type-A ports, adding much needed extra ports to your Raspberry Pi. Available in two color choices, red and white or black and grey, this new keyboard has been designed to work with all three Japanese character sets.

  • The fastest USB storage options for Raspberry Pi

    After posting my tests concerning UASP support in USB SATA adapters, I got an email from Rob Logan mentioning the performance of some other types of drives he had with him. And he even offered to ship a few drives to me for comparisons!

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Fujitsu Begins Adding A64FX Support To GCC Compiler

    The Fujitsu A64FX ARM processor that has 48 cores per node and 32GB of HBM2 memory that currently powers the fastest supercomputer is beginning to see GCC compiler support.

    Fujitsu months ago upstreamed A64FX support to the LLVM/Clang compiler. It appears this ARMv8.2-based chip with 512-bit SIMD is using LLVM/Clang as its preferred compiler. But now Fujitsu is also upstreaming GCC support for their high performance A64FX.

  • Jussi Pakkanen: The second edition of the Meson manual is out

    I have just uploaded the second edition of the Meson manual to the web store for your purchasing pleasure.

  • Junichi Uekawa: Started writing some golang code.

    Started writing some golang code. Trying to rewrite some of the tools as a daily driver for machine management tool. It's easier than rust in that having a good rust compiler is a hassle though golang preinstalled on systems can build and run. go run is simple enough to invoke on most Debian systems.

  • Url Shortner in Golang

    I decided to write my own URL shortner and the reason for doing that was to dive a little more into golang and to learn more about systems. I have planned to not only document my learning but also find and point our different ways in which this application can be made scalable, resilient and robust.

  • LLVM Clang 11 Has A Nice Build Speed Improvement With New Feature For Pre-Compiled Headers

    There are many improvements in LLVM/Clang 11.0 due out in the weeks ahead though an interesting change merged prior to last month's code branching that slipped under our radar... If using the clang-cl driver for MSVC or when otherwise making use of pre-compiled headers (PCH) functionality, there is a new option that can offer significant build time speed-ups.

    When making use of Clang PCH functionality for leveraging pre-compiled headers, Clang 11.0 is introducing the -fpch-instantiate-templates option separate from the existing PCH options. This -fpch-instantiate-templates option instantiates templates already while generating a precompiled header instead of instantiating every time the pre-compiled header is used. Avoiding the instantiation each time the pre-compiled header is used can provide measurable build time improvements. Aside from the MSVC clang-cl drop-in, this feature though isn't enabled by default since it can result in errors if the source header file is not self-contained.

  • Call for Code Daily: open source projects and answered calls

    The power of Call for Code® is in the global community that we have built around this major #TechforGood initiative. Whether it is the deployments that are underway across pivotal projects, developers leveraging the starter kits in the cloud, or ecosystem partners joining the fight, everyone has a story to tell. Call for Code Daily highlights all the amazing #TechforGood stories taking place around the world. Every day, you can count on us to share these stories with you. Check out the stories from the week of August 3rd:

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 6 Check-in

    Works towards analyzing multistage dockerfile. I combined the draft PR and the review from my mentors, the new commit is the first step of my plan. We split the multistage dockerfile into seperate dockefiles for build. Here are the changes in the new commit.

    1. Modified function check_multistage_dockerfile() to return.

    2. Remove function split_multistage_dockerfile() since we are working on the building stage. split_multistage_dockerfile() can be improved on analyze stage.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxix) stackoverflow python report
  • Send WhatsApp media/message using Python.

    Though there are many scripts available which are almost free but later on leads to getting blocked by Whatsapp.

    We can use Twilio Library for sending and receiving whatsapp messages even for WhatsApp bussiness.

  • Generate a random number in Java

    Java contains many ways to generate random numbers. The random number can be int, long, float, double, and Boolean. Math.random class and Random class are mostly used to generate random numbers in Java. The uses of these classes are shown in this tutorial by using various examples.

    [...]

    The random class has many methods to generate different types of random numbers, such as nextInt(), nextDouble(), nextLong, etc. So, the integer and fractional numbers can be generated by using the appropriate method of this class. You have to create an object to use in this class.

  • Open Source Jenkins CI/CD Project Graduates From CD Foundation

    Officially launched by the Linux Foundation in March 2019, the CD Foundation includes in its project portfolio some of the most widely used and deployed CI/CD tools, including Jenkins, Spinnaker and Tekton. The open source Jenkins CI/CD project gains more community participation and a roadmap for future improvements.

Security, Openwashing, Proprietary Software and Back Doors

Filed under
Security
  • Reproducible Builds in July 2020

    Welcome to the July 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project.

    In these monthly reports, we round-up the things that we have been up to over the past month. As a brief refresher, the motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced from the original free software source code to the pre-compiled binaries we install on our systems. (If you’re interested in contributing to the project, please visit our main website.)

  • Have I Been Pwned — which tells you if passwords were breached — is going open source

    While not all password checkup tools actually use Hunt’s database (a just-announced LastPass feature calls on one hosted by Enzoic instead), many of them are apparently based on the same “k-Anonymity” API that Cloudflare engineering manager Junade Ali originally designed to support Have I Been Pwned’s tool.

  • Facebook’s new open-source Pysa security tool detects [cr]ackable code

    Pysa is designed exclusively to analyze code written in Python. That limits the scenarios where the tool can be applied, but it could be still useful for other companies because Python is the world’s second most widely used programming language as of earlier this year. It’s especially popular in artificial intelligence development and is also the language in which most of the code for Instagram is written.

    Facebook has applied Pysa to the Instagram code base to great effect. According to the company, the tool was responsible for spotting 44% of the server-side security issues that it detected in the photo sharing service during the first half of 2020. Some 49 of the flaws Pysa caught were determined to be “severe” vulnerabilities.

    Under the hood, the tool works by employing a technique known as static code analysis. It sifts through Facebook developers’ raw code files without the delay of running them to quickly generate security assessments.

  • [Cr]ackers can still steal wads of cash from ATMs. Here's the vulnerabilities that could let them in.

    “You’re literally trusting this machine to hold thousands of dollars, but it’s running [Windows operating system] CE 6.0? It is just a computer, on a network, running an older operating system,” Keown said, noting that the latest release for CE 6.0 was over a decade ago in 2009. “This is still a problem. Let’s focus some effort here and see if we can’t move the needle in the right direction.”

  • Canon Admits Ransomware Attack in Employee Note, Report

    The consumer-electronics giant has suffered partial outages across its U.S. website and internal systems reportedly, thanks to the Maze gang.

  • Windows, Gates and a firewall: Microsoft's delicate castle in China

    Microsoft arrived in China in 1992 and opened its largest research and development centre outside the United States. It now employs around 6,200 people in China.

  • All you need to hijack a Mac is an old Office document and a .zip file

    The exploit uses a rigged Office document, saved in an archaic format (.slk), to trick the target machine into allowing Office to activate macros without consent and without notifying the user.

    The attack then takes advantage of two further vulnerabilities in order to seize control of the machine. By including a dollar sign at the start of the filename, [an attacker] can break free of the restrictive Office sandbox, while compressing the file within a .zip folder bypasses macOS controls that prevent downloaded items from accessing user files.

  • Apple’s Chinese business could be devastated by Trump’s WeChat ban

    Apple has a significant Chinese customer base, and nearly all of its critical manufacturing and assembly partners are based there. Trump’s ban might not only force Apple to remove WeChat from its App Store — which would destroy Apple’s Chinese smartphone business — it could existentially change how Apple is able to build and sell new products in the future.

  • It's Time To Stop Talking and Take Action Against the Beasts that Want to Control Us

    I know I have not been active on this BLOG the past year. No reasons. Anyway, I'm back at it. This time, I have a specific focus on Big Tech. The way I see it, the root of the problem is not the tech companies themselves, it starts with the software we use. This includes Adobe, Intuit, Microsoft. I call them AIM. They are the worst offenders in there attempts to control the free world.

Linux 5.9 and AMD Sensor Fusion Hub Driver

Filed under
Linux

  • Several Drivers Promoted Out Of Staging With Linux 5.9

    The "staging" area of the kernel, where new drivers and other code live that has yet to prove itself or live up to kernel code quality standards, saw a few drivers graduate into Linux mainline proper for the current 5.9 cycle.

    Linux 5.9's staging area is quite vibrant along with the IIO (Industrial I/O) changes sent in as part of the pull request as usual by Greg Kroah-Hartman.

  • Linux 5.9 Brings More IBM POWER10 Support, New/Faster SCV System Call ABI

    With Linux 5.8 there is initial support for booting POWER10 CPUs while with Linux 5.9 there is more POWER10 work underway. Additionally, Linux 5.9 is bringing support for the newer and faster system call ABI for POWER9 and newer with the SCV instruction.

    Linux 5.9 has "support for a new faster system call ABI using the scv instruction on Power9 or later." That is the recently covered work on POWER System Call Vectored (SCV). Using SCV can utilize faster registers and reducing machine specific register updates among other benefits for existing POWER9 CPUs and future POWER10 hardware.

  • AMD Sensor Fusion Hub Driver Under Review A Sixth Time For Linux

    While a lot of interesting changes are coming for the in-development Linux 5.9 kernel, sadly a long overdue change isn't going to make the merge window and that is the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub driver.

    The AMD Sensor Fusion Hub is utilized by some AMD Zen laptops for accelerometer and gyroscopic sensors on the devices, akin to the Intel Sensor Hub (ISH) that has long been supported under Linux. While the Sensor Fusion Hub (SFH) is used by laptops going back to Zen 1 hardware, it was only earlier this year that the AMD SFH Linux driver was posted.

Porteus-v5.0rc2 is released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After nearly 14 months and a lot of developments (circumstantial and technical), Team Porteus is happy to announce Porteus-v5.0rc2.

Read more

Perl Programming

Filed under
Development
  • On Perl 7 and the Perl Steering Committee

    For those who are wondering about the state of the proposed Perl 7 fork and the role of the newly formed Perl Steering Committee, Ricardo Signes has put together a detailed explanation that is worth a read. "You should not expect to see a stream of unjustified dictates issuing forth from some secret body on high. You should expect to see perl5-porters operating as it generally did: with proposals coming to the list, getting discussion, and then being thumbed up or down by the project manager. This is what has been happening for years, already. Some proposals were already discussed by the project manager and some were not. If you eliminated any named mailing list for doing this, it would still happen. The PSC is a means to say that there is a default group for such discussions. If you were wondering, its initial membership was formed from 'the people who came to or were invited to the Perl Core Summit' over the last few years."

  • LWN: On Perl 7 and the Perl Steering Committee

    LWN has covered an email from Rjb's to perl5-porters

  • The Perl Ambassador: Curtis 'Ovid' Poe

    This month’s interview is Curtis ‘Ovid’ Poe, one of the most-respected and well-known leaders in the Perl community.

    Curtis has been building software for decades. He specializes in building database-driven websites through his global development and consulting firm, All Around The World. He’s the main developer behind Tau Station, a text-based Massive Multiplayer Online Browser Game (MMOBG) set in a vibrant, far-future universe.

  • Mohammad S Anwar: Thank you for the support

    Inspired by the blog by Gabor Szabo, I am writing this blog to thank all the supporters on Patreon. I would also like to thank Gabor Szabo for the support and guidance. I wouldn't have come this far without your support.

How to Convert Video to GIF in Linux [Terminal and GUI Methods]

Filed under
HowTos

Learn to convert videos to GIF in Linux. Both the command line and GUI methods have been discussed in this beginner’s tutorial.
Read more

GNU/Linux on YouTube

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Distrohopping Sucks. I'm Never Leaving You Again, Arch Linux!

    In the last 24 hours, I have distrohopped 8 times on my main production machine. Several failed installs and several bottles of wine later, I realized I messed up. You never quit a good thing, and I had a good thing with the Arch-based distros, especially Arco.

  •        

  • Exploring Desktop Alternatives Live

    Exploring Desktop Alternatives Live - This stream will do a full Debian Install and customize the Desktop Environment to something new.

  •        

  • TuxURLs And Other Linux News Aggregators Worth Checking Out

    There's always way too much news too look at and I find that the easiest way to deal with this is too use some sort of Linux news aggregation service to filter out the garbage that I don't really want to see and today we're going to take a look at a couple of those Linux news aggregators which I think are worth checking out. One such example is TuxURLs which as you'll see if you watch towards the end of the video is my personal favourite for very self centred reasons. 

Kernel: Linux Plumbers and New in Linux 5.9

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Plumbers currently sold out

    Linux Plumbers is currently sold out of regular registration tickets. Although the conference is virtual this year our virtual platform cannot support an unlimited number of attendees, hence the cap on registration. We are currently reviewing our capacity limits to see if we can allow more people to attend without over burdening the virtual platform and potentially preventing discussion. We will make another announcement next week regarding registration.

  • Linux 5.9 Supports A Lot Of New Audio Hardware, Intel Silent Stream Added

    The Linux kernel continues supporting a lot more audio devices and much more punctual than a decade or two ago.

  • Linux 5.9 Networking Changes Are As Active As Ever

    Each kernel cycle the networking subsystem sees a lot of churn given the importance of network interconnect performance and reliability especially in high performance computing environments where Linux dominates.

5 of the Best Linux Laptops in 2020

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you’re shopping for a laptop and know you’re planning to run Linux, you can either get any laptop, reformat the hard drive and install your favorite Linux distro on it or just get a laptop that is running Linux right out of the box. Here are some of the best Linux laptops you can get in 2020.

[...]

These all come preloaded with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, which is a solid base for any of the various flavors or just vanilla Ubuntu. Many of the drivers have been contributed upstream by Dell, so many distros that use newer kernels should be able to take full advantage of the Killer Wi-Fi cards and Intel Iris Plus Graphics.

[...]

Pine64 has been in the news often for its Pinephone, but the Pinebook Pro is another great product from them. It’s a 14” ARM laptop that weighs less than 3 lbs/1.5 KG and sips power. It’s a great little machine that helps to push Linux forward on the ARM platform and comes in just under $200.

Read more

Richard Stallman: A Discussion on Freedom, Privacy & Cryptocurrencies

Filed under
GNU
Interviews

Dr. Richard Stallman is well-known for his free software movement activism. His speeches and work revolve around a term: freedom. And it is precisely that word that prompted Stallman to launch the GNU Project, founding the Free Software Foundation and releasing the GNU General Public License, among other projects, to promote the free software concept.

RMS, as Dr. Stallman is also known, has some opinions regarding the concept of cryptocurrencies that have been widely discussed within the crypto community.

Read more

CoreELEC 9.2.4 Linux Distro Adds ODROID-N2+ and La Frite SBC Support, Kodi 18.8

Filed under
Linux

CoreELEC 9.2.4 is a major update that comes about two months after version 9.2.3 with numerous new features and improvements. First and foremost, this release introduces new hardware support, allowing users to install CoreELEC on new single-board computers, including Libre Computer’s La Frite and ODROID-N2+, along with official support for Beelink and MINIX devices.

It also adds support for new accessories, including the ODROID HiFi-Shields high-resolution Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) and other I2S devices on the ODROID-C4 single-board computer, as well as support for RTL8156 based USB adapters and support for RT5651 analog audio amp used in the MINIX U22X-XJ and Ugoos AM6 Android TV box sets.

Read more

KDE Frameworks 5.73 Released with Many Changes to Breeze Icons, Kirigami and KNewStuff

Filed under
KDE

KDE Frameworks 5.73 is a monthly update to the open-source software suite, but it packs a lot of interesting changes. For example, the Kirigami UI builder received a new FlexColumn component and now supports action visibility in the GlobalDrawer, along with optimizations to the mobile layout and to the accessibility of the Kirigami input fields.

The Breeze icon theme saw a lot of changes too during the development cycle of KDE Frameworks 5.73, and it now comes with a bunch of new icons for Kontrast, kirigami-gallery, snap-angle, document-replace, SMART status, task-recurring, appointment-recurring, Overwrite action/button, and applications/pkcs12 mime type.

Read more

Redo Rescue Backup and Recovery Live System Gets NFS Share Support, SSH Server

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

For those not in the know, Redo Rescue is a great, free and easy to use live Linux system based on Debian GNU/Linux that can help you whenever your computer is broken by letting you backup and restore an entire system in just a few minutes.

For example, if your computer no longer boots after installing the recent BootHole patches for the GRUB2 bootloader, you can use Redo Rescue to repair the boot. Of course, there are a few other tools that can do the same, but Redo Rescue can also do bare metal restores by replacing the MBR and partition table, re-map original data to a different target partition and even verify the integrity of an existing backup image.

Read more

Pocket P.C. design files released as open source (handheld Linux computer)

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Popcorn Computers Pocket P.C. is designed to be a handheld Linux computer with a 4.95 inch full HD display, a built-in keyboard, and a ARM Cortex-A53 quad-core processor.

First unveiled in November 2019, the Pocket P.C. hasn’t shipped yet. It’s still up for pre-order for $199 and up.

But the developers have already open sourced the hardware by releasing the latest design files. You can find the at the project’s GitHub page.

Read more

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  • Python For Loop: Everything You Need to Know

    Loops are one of the essential elements in any programming language, and Python is not an exception to it. Loops are used to repeat a statement or a block of statements multiple times. If there were no concept of loops in programming languages, we have to write each statement again and again for the number of times we want to execute it. Python provides two types of loops to handle looping requirements, i.e., the while loop and the for loop. In this tutorial, we will learn everything about the for loop statement in Python. Before getting started with this tutorial, It is necessary to have Python installed and set up in your environment path. If you don’t have it installed already, refer to our step by step guide to install Python on Linux. The code presented in this tutorial can be run on the python shell, but it is recommended to run the code in a Python IDE. If you don’t have a python IDE installed in your system or want to know which IDE is a better choice to install, you can refer to our guide Top 10 best python IDE compared.

  • NihAV Is An Experimental Multimedia Framework Written In Rust

    NihAV is an experimental multimedia framework written in the Rust programming language. At the moment it's focused on diving into supporting decoders for different formats that lack open-source support right now / not yet reverse engineered, exploring new approaches for conventional multimedia concepts, and other experiments for advancing audio-video frameworks.

  • rra-c-util 8.3

    n this release of my utility library for my other packages, I finally decided to drop support for platforms without a working snprintf. This dates back to the early 2000s and a very early iteration of this package. At the time, there were still some older versions of UNIX without snprintf at all. More commonly, it was buggy. The most common problem was that it would return -1 if the buffer wasn't large enough rather than returning the necessary size of the buffer. Or, in some cases, it wouldn't support a buffer size of 0 and a NULL buffer to get the necessary size.

  • Embedded Programming and Beyond: An Interview with Warren Gay

    Interested in embedded programming? Warren Gay, an Ontario, Canada-based senior programmer, is an excellent resource for professional programmers, students, and makers alike. Here he talks about his new book, FreeRTOS for ESP32-Arduino (Elektor, 2020), and shares insights about FreeRTOS, ESP32, Arduino, embedded technologies, and more. You are sure to find his input informative and inspiring, especially if you plan to work with ESP32 or Arduino in the near future.

  • PHP 7.1 - 8 new features

    In the PHP 7.0 version function declaration accepts a return type, with the release of 7.1 version functions and parameters can return/accept null by prefixing the data type with a question mark(?). if the data type passed as parameter or returned by a function is different from the type specified a TypeError exception will be thrown.

  • Senior Developers don’t know Everything

    For about 20 years, I’ve been doing C++ and Qt and KDE development. I suppose that makes me a “senior software engineer”, also in the sense that I’ve hacked, programmed, futzed, designed, architected, tested, proved-correct, and cursed at a lot of software. But don’t let the label fool you: I look up just as much in the documentation as I ever did; senior developers don’t know everything.

Software and Games: Cloud Hypervisor, Joplin, Kodi, MuseScore, Bashtop, Grounded

  • Intel Cloud-Hypervisor 0.9 Brings io_uring Block Device Support For Faster Performance

    Intel's Cloud Hypervisor focused on being a Rustlang-based hypervisor focused for cloud workloads is closing in on the 1.0 milestone. With this week's release of Cloud-Hypervisor 0.9 there is one very exciting feature in particular but also a lot of other interesting changes. 

  • Joplin

    Joplin is a free, open source note taking and to-do application, which can handle a large number of notes organised into notebooks. The notes are searchable, can be copied, tagged and modified either from the applications directly or from your own text editor. The notes are in Markdown format. Notes exported from Evernote via .enex files can be imported into Joplin, including the formatted content (which is converted to Markdown), resources (images, attachments, etc.) and complete metadata (geolocation, updated time, created time, etc.). Plain Markdown files can also be imported. The notes can be synchronized with various cloud services including Nextcloud, Dropbox, OneDrive, WebDAV or the file system (for example with a network directory). When synchronizing the notes, notebooks, tags and other metadata are saved to plain text files which can be easily inspected, backed up and moved around.

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  • Kodi 19 Alpha 1 Released With AV1 Decoding, Many Other HTPC Improvements

    Kodi 19 "Matrix" Alpha 1 has been released for this very popular, cross-platform open-source HTPC software.  Kodi 19 is bringing many exciting improvements as a major update to this open-source home theater software. 

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  • Scorewriter MuseScore 3.5 Released with Chord Symbol Playback

    MuseScore, free music composition and notation software, released version 3.5 with long list of new features, bug fixes, and other improvements. MuseScore 3.5 contains one of the most requested features: Chord Symbol Playback. The feature is disabled by default so far. You can enable it by going to Edit > Preferences > Note Input.

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  • Bashtop: An Htop Like System Monitor But Much More Useful

    As cool as Htop there is one thing that it's seriously lacking in and that is system monitoring tools, this may not be a problem for you but if you want a system monitor than bashtop is a much better option to choose, it let's you do most of the process management stuff that you want from htop but it comes with things like hard drive usage, network usage and cpu usage statistics. 

  • An Early Look at Grounded

    You’re in control of a child, who looks like he/she hasn’t entered the teenager years just yet. Among four different children — two boys and two girls — they’ve got a big problem: they’ve been shrunk to the size of an insect. Join them in their adventure — either by yourself or with a group of online friends — as they fight to survive in someone’s backyard, trying to build shelters whilst defending against bugs, and figure out why they’ve shrunk in the first place. Enter Grounded, developed by Obsidian Entertainment — the studio that brought us such titles as Pillars of Eternity, The Outer Worlds, and Star Wars: KOTOR2.

Fedora: LTO, Nest and More

  • Fedora 33 Moving Closer To LTO-Optimizing Packages

    Going back to last year Fedora has been working to enable link-time optimizations by default for their packages. That goal wasn't achieved for Fedora 32 but for Fedora 33 this autumn they still have chances of marking that feature off their TODO list.  LTO'ing the Fedora package set can offer not only performance advantages but in some cases smaller binaries as well. This is all about applying the compiler optimizations at link-time on the binary as a whole for yielding often sizable performance benefits and other optimizations not otherwise possible. LTO is great as we often show in benchmarks, especially in the latest GCC and LLVM Clang compilers. 

  • Zamir SUN: Report for session 1 of FZUG @ Nest with Fedora

    Last month, Alick suggested the Fedora Zhongwen User Group (FZUG) can do a online meetup during Nest with Fedora. And based on the survey, people registered for two time slots, the first one is 9:00 PM Saturday evening UTC+8 which is not a good time for Alick, so I take up the coordinating role for this session. As for the tool, we decided to use Jitsi, as it should work fine for most of us and do not have any limitations. What’s more, it’s totally open source. During the meeting, I firstly introduced Nest with Fedora and it’s previous offline version, Flock to Fedora, to the attendees. It’s interesting to see that during the past years, we not only have new users in China, but also new contributors. One attendee shares that his motivation of being a packager is that deploying packages for their research in the lab is cumbersome before. So he decided to package all into Fedora and then he can just simply install them on every machine. It is good to know that people contribute back because they want to solve their own problems. Maybe this can be a talking point to attract more contributors in the future. After the self introduction, we continue by sharing our interesting stores with Linux. That is a lot of fun.

  • Jon Chiappetta: Last piece of relay software needed for my home bridged network

    If you are running a bridged/relayd network with macs on it you may need to also forward the multicast broadcasts (mDNS related) that allow the devices to automatically discover each other. On the WRT wifi client side, there is a pkg called avahi-daemon and you can configure to operate in “reflector” mode to forward these broadcasts across the specified interfaces. Running this service along with the dhcprb C program which takes care of layer 2 arp requests & dhcp gateway forwarding has been pretty smooth so far!

Perl Programming: Exercises and DocKnot Release

  • The [Perl] Weekly Challenge #072

    I am glad, this week focus was more Array/List related. Technical speaking Array and List aren’t the same in Perl. I must admit until I read the article by brian d foy, I thought they were the same. As the famous saying, you learn something new every day.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 72: One-Liners for Trailing Zeros and Line Ranges

    These are some answers to the Week 72 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar. Spoiler Alert: This weekly challenge deadline is due in a few hours. This blog post offers some solutions to this challenge, please don’t read on if you intend to complete the challenge on your own.

  • Russ Allbery: DocKnot 3.05

    I keep telling myself that the next release of DocKnot will be the one where I convert everything to YAML and then feel confident about uploading it to Debian, and then I keep finding one more thing to fix to release another package I'm working on. Anyway, this is the package I use to generate software documentation and, in the long run, will subsume my static web site generator and software release workflow. This release tweaks a heuristic for wrapping paragraphs in text documents, fixes the status badge for software with Debian packages to do what I had intended, and updates dependencies based on the advice of Perl::Critic::Freenode.