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Thursday, 28 Jan 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, TLLTS, and FLOSS Weekly Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 6:14am
Story Quick Look at Redcore Linux 2101 Beta Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 6:07am
Story EasyOS Dunfell 2.6.1 released for x86_64 PC Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 6:05am
Story The first release candidate of NomadBSD 1.4 is now available! Roy Schestowitz 1 28/01/2021 - 5:56am
Story Top 20 Uses of Linux Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 5:34am
Story parted-3.4 released [stable] Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 5:30am
Story Kernel: LWN's Latest and IO_uring Patches Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 5:19am
Story Installing Debian on modern hardware Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 5:15am
Story Wayland 1.19 Released With Small Protocol Updates, Fixes Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 5:04am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 2:34am

First Look at MX Linux Fluxbox on the Raspberry Pi 4

Filed under
Reviews

MX Linux Fluxbox-RaspberryPi Respin is MX Linux’s first attempt to offer an AArch64 (ARM64) port for the Raspberry Pi single-board computer. The work is done by Jerry Bond and others, and let me tell you that it’s one of the best Linux on Raspberry Pi experiences I’ve tried so far in terms of performance and usability.

I’m not a fan of the Fluxbox window manager, but I understand why Jerry Bond choose it as default graphical environment for this Raspberry Pi spin of MX Linux. It’s super fast and consumes very few resources. For example, the RAM usage is always around 300MB (without any apps running), and that’s very important for older devices, such as a Raspberry Pi 3 with 2GB RAM.

Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

  • CloudLinux expands its Extended Lifecycle Support services for Linux distributions

    CloudLinux announces the expansion of its affordable Extended Lifecycle Support (ELS) services for Linux distributions, by providing its own updates and security patches for several years after expiration of the products’ end-of-life date. For example, support for CentOS 6 from Red Hat expired November 30 last year.

    CloudLinux offers ELS for CentOS 6, available since November, 2020 and extends to June 2024. Oracle Linux 6 (ends March 2021) Extended Lifecycle Support service will be available starting in February 2021 and will extend to February 2025. Extended Lifecycle Support service for Ubuntu 16.04 (ends April 2021) and Debian 9 (ends June 2022) is under development.

  • Moving your applications to the cloud with Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is widely deployed on-premise to run a variety of applications, but more conservative customers may need guidance in taking their first steps toward the cloud. One of the features in RHEL 8.3 is Image Builder’s Push to Cloud capability, which can help simplify and accelerate the transformation of workloads to the cloud. Building custom images is just one way to deploy RHEL for your enterprise.

    [...]

    RHEL provides a stable, manageable platform for applications for architects, operations, developers. Though some organizations may be hesitant to deploy an open source OS, RHEL is a supported solution, and there are ways to give it a try.

  • Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.6 Offers New Data Resilience Capabilities

    Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.6 helps enterprises expand their existing data protection capabilities to include Kubernetes applications, without requiring additional technology or infrastructure upgrades.

    Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.6 delivers snapshot functionality orchestrated by the Container Storage Interface (CSI) for customizable, point-in-time snapshots and clones of persistent data volumes. This makes it easier for IT administrators and application developers to more quickly return to a prior state.

  • Elastic Deep Learning in high performance multitenant cluster

    The Elastic Deep Learning capabilities of IBM Watson® Machine Learning Accelerator are designed for large-scale distributed deep learning workloads. It transforms static monolithic training into a dynamic process that is resilient to failures and automatically scales GPU allocation while training.

    Data scientists, deep learning developers, and administrators can use Elastic Deep Learning capabilities to simplify production deployment, improve run time efficiency, and deliver on service level agreements (SLAs).

  • How to Install Webmin on Fedora Linux

    Keeping an eye on your system’s performance is one of the essential tasks that any Linux user should undertake from time to time. This helps in diagnosing any bottlenecks that are likely to impact performance.

    Webmin is a free and open-source front-end monitoring and administration tool that helps Linux users have a glance at various system metrics and perform administration tasks without the need of running commands on the terminal.

Ubuntu: Design and Web, Kubernetes, and More of Canonical

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Design and Web team summary – 27th January 2021

    The web team here at Canonical run two-week iterations. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration.

  • Canonical & Kubernetes: 2020 highlights

    We’re now well into 2021, and as we plan ahead for our roadmap and activities around Kubernetes for the year, it helps to look back and reflect on everything that took place for Canonical in the K8s space within the year that passed.

    Kubernetes has always been a crucial part of Canonical’s vision and contribution to the IT world. All leading cloud providers, such as Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Cisco and IBM run cloud Kubernetes services on Ubuntu, because we focus on the latest container capabilities in modern kernels. This focus is why Ubuntu is also the top choice for on-premises enterprise Kubernetes, with MicroK8s, kubeadm and Charmed Kubernetes all supported by Canonical.

  • Magewell HDMI Capture with ffmpeg ·

    On Linux, no additional driver is needed. When attached to a USB port the Magewell device shows up under /dev/video* on Linux. There’s a few software options available to capture the stream including VLC and OBS, but I prefer to use a little script. I call it make_screencast and it lives in my /home/alan/bin folder, on the machine capturing the video. The script is below.

Devices and Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
  • EasyOS Dunfell 2.6.1 released for the Raspberry Pi4

    The very first release of EasyOS Dunfell-series for the Raspberry Pi4 was version 2.6, released on January 19. See announcement:
    https://bkhome.org/news/202101/easyos-dunfell-26-released-for-the-raspberry-pi4.html
    Since then, some package version bumps: SeaMonkey is now version 2.53.6 and includes the IRC chat module, ffmpeg is 4.3.1. LibreOffice is still a somewhat old version, 7.0.1.2, but I recompiled it with PDF-import support, which seemed like a good thing to have.
    Version 2.6.1 also has Samba, which had been left out of 2.6. Also added package 'smbnetfs'. Oh yes, also added package 'tigervnc', that Forum member rufwoof reported as very fast. Added package 'libvdpau-va-gl' though don't really know why.
    There were some performance issues with 2.6, that have mostly been fixed. SeaMonkey was often temporarily freezing, which seems to have been fixed by changing to 'kyber' IO scheduling. Plugging in a USB-stick, the kernel now consistently recognizes it first go -- due to version bump of the kernel from 5.10.4 to 5.10.9 and update of the device-tree.

  • Build a programmable light display on Raspberry Pi | Opensource.com

    This past holiday season, I decided to add some extra joy to our house by setting up a DIY light display. I used a Raspberry Pi, a programmable light string, and Python.

    [...]

    Each light can be individually programmed using an RGB set of integers or hex equivalents. These lights can be packaged together into matrices, strings, and other form factors, and they can be programmatically accessed using a data structure that makes sense for the form factor. The light strings I use are addressed using a standard Python list. Adafruit has a great tutorial on wiring and controlling your lights.

    [...]

    The neopixel_controller Flask application, in the neopix_controller directory of the github repository (see below), offers a front-end browser graphical user interface (GUI) to control the lights. My raspberry pi connects to my wifi, and is accessible at raspberrypi.local. To access the GUI in a browser, go to http://raspberrypi.local:5000. Alternatively, you can use ping to find the IP address of raspberrypi.local, and use it as the hostname, which is useful if you have multiple raspberry pi devices connected to your wifi.

  • OnLogic Elkhart Lake fanless mini PC's are made for IIoT applications

    OnLogic mini PCs can be configured to meet the specific requirements, and run a range of Windows or Linux operating systems. The company also offers custom branding, software imaging, custom fulfilment services, and lifecycle management support.

  • Elkhart Lake embedded PC quartet deliver triple 4K displays

    OnLogic is adding to its line of Helix and rugged, higher-end Karbon embedded PCs with four new Helix 300 and Karbon 400 models that run Linux or Windows on Intel’s Elkhart Lake.

    OnLogic has announced four fanless embedded systems built around Intel’s 10nm-fabricated, MCU-equipped Elkhart Lake Atom, Celeron, and Pentium processors. The smaller Helix 310 (HX310) and Helix 330 (HX330) and more expandable and rugged Karbon 410 (K410) and Karbon 430 (K430) all run Linux or Windows and will ship in the second quarter.

  • Arduino Create Agent 1.2.0 is finally here

    It’s been a while since the last release of the Arduino Create Agent.

    We tried to give some love to this awesome tool, in order to enhance the experience with the Create ecosystem.

  • Arduino Blog » Portenta Vision Shield now available with LoRa® module

    What better way to announce the availability of the Portenta Vision Shield LoRa than at The Things Conference 2021 – a global showcase for all the top-notch LoRaWAN products and services.

    The LoRa® module option of the Portenta Vision Shield is specifically designed for edge ML applications, enabling low-power, long distance communication over LoRa® wireless protocol and LoRaWAN networks. It’s the perfect addition to the powerful Arduino Portenta H7 which makes possible machine learning on-device, thereby greatly reducing the communication bandwidth requirement in an IoT application.

Free, Libre, and Open Source Software Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
OSS

  • Elastic Licensing and Elasticsearch Forks

    Last week saw dramatic and rapid developments around Elastic and their open-source product Elasticsearch.

    Elasticsearch is a great product that became widely adopted in the last few years - I’ve seen and used it since probably 2013 or 2014.

    I’m not qualified as a customer or user of Elastic and AWS to make a statement on these developments - just don’t have enough open-source exposure on a regular basis yet. But I want to capture these announcements because it feels like a major changefor all parties involved.

    If you’re an Elastic customer or Elasticsearch user - please take the time to read through the full posts listed below.

  • Apache ECharts Promoted To Top-Level Project For Modern Charting + Visualizations

    Just last week Apache Superset was promoted to being a top-level project by the Apache Software Foundation. Apache Superset is around big data visualizations and business intelligence solutions through data exploration while now Apache ECharts has joined it as the latest top-level project.

    Apache ECharts was promoted on Tuesday to being a top-level project within the Apache Software Foundation umbrella. ECharts is a charting and data visualization solution that started out in 2013 at Baidu. It's been considered an Apache incubator project for the past three years while now this charting and visualization library is considered a top-level project and seeing usage by the likes of GitLab, Intel, Amazon, Tencent, and many other organizations.

  • FSFE's plans for 2021 +++ IloveFS +++ FOSDEM

    The FSFE will celebrate its birthday as we turn 20 in 2021. 20 years of defending user's rights and spreading software freedom. We want to use that momentum to speak, show and reflect on our activities in the past 20 years. And we want to give momentum to our community because it is on their shoulders that we have built our movement and our networks, which form a well-known pan-European Free Software expert interest representation called Free Software Foundation Europe. More information on this in the next newsletter.

    As we turn 20, we will continue to have to deal with the current global situation, for instance by running our events online this year. Our running campaigns will be updated and we will launch a brand-new campaign "Upcycling Android" towards the second half of the year – stay tuned.

  • The EU Open Source Policy Summit 2021 on 5 February

    This year’s EC Open Source Policy Summit will be virtual and will start with two keynotes: the European Commissioner for Internal Market Thierry Breton and the Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Red Hat Chris Wright. Speakers include EU policy-makers and representatives of the industry, as well as actors coming from other layers of the ICT community, such as consumer associations and academia, who will address current issues in digital policy. Prof. Dr. Knut Blind will present for the first time the policy recommendations concluding the European Commission’s study on the impact of Open Source.

  • Stephen Michael Kellat: Talking Communities

    While the Community Council continues its solicitation of candidates for a Local Communities Research Committee it seems best to try to write up some reflections as a former member of the Local Communities Council. I know the Community Council wants the committee to find its way getting started in its research. I have some nagging concerns that have been unresolved for a while.

    [...]

    As of last census estimate Ohio is the seventh most populous of the fifty states. That led to interesting times as the point of contact and leader for Ohio’s local community group. During my tenure we had people involved. We were far-flung across the thirty-fourth largest state by area. Although we tried to gather together at least once a year at the Ohio Linux Fest event (a separate matter that we did not organize) such gatherings were a logistical nightmare to arrange. I remember handling the organization of an UbuCon event and how flexibility was key. With the mass gathering ban from the Ohio Department of Health still in full force and effect we won’t be gathering together in-person as a community any time soon. The group’s e-mail list last had a message in 2018 and the IRC channel has activity infrequently. Technology and paradigms for “being alone together” that originated during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic simply weren’t viable during my tenure trying to be leader.

  •        

  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.5a8

           

             

    Tor Browser 10.5a8 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

             

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

     

  • [llvm-dev] Trunk is now 13.0.0
    Hi,
    
    
    
    
    I've created the release/12.x branch and bumped the trunk version to 13.0.0.
    I'm planning to tag 12.0.0-rc1 on Wednesday, once I'm sure there are no major
    issues with the branch.
    
    
    
    
    -Tom
    
  • LLVM 12 Ends Feature Work With Better C++20 Support To Intel Sapphire Rapids + AMD Zen 3

    Feature development on LLVM 12.0 has ended along with associated sub-projects like Clang and libc++. Feature work now shifts to LLVM 13.0 while the LLVM 12 stable release should be out in just over one month's time. 

    LLVM release manager Tom Stellard announced on Tuesday night that the 12.x release branch has been created and the main development trunk open to LLVM 13.0 feature work. 

    LLVM 12.0-RC1 is expected to be tagged later today while a second release candidate is expected before the end of February. If all goes well, LLVM 12.0.0 will be out around the start of March. 

  •  

  • Qt and CMake: The Past, the Present and the Future

    We made a big decision to start using CMake to build Qt 6 one and a half years ago. The main reason for the decision was user feedback. Most Qt users wanted to have easier integration of their Qt projects with the rest of their software. According to the studies at that time, CMake was clearly the most commonly used build tool among Qt users - qmake aside. In addition, migrating to CMake gave us an opportunity to get rid of the maintenance burden of our internal build tools. 

    Even bigger than the decision was the effort required to migrate to CMake.  Now the essential migration work has been completed and it's time to share our findings.

  •  

  • QBSP Cookbook available for Qt 6.0

    With all the fanfare and trumping about Qt 6.0 a small but important part of documentation may have been overlooked: The Qt for Device Creation documentation got a major facelift and reorganization. As part of that we took  feedback and needs from our hardware partners and created something that can be described as a Qt Board Support Package, QBSP cookbook. 

  •  

  • Why I use the D programming language for scripting

    The D programming language is often advertised as a system programming language due to its static typing and metaprogramming capabilities. However, it's also a very productive scripting language.

    Python is commonly chosen for scripting due to its flexibility for automating tasks and quickly prototyping ideas. This makes Python very appealing to sysadmins, managers, and developers in general for automating recurring tasks that they might otherwise have to do manually.

  •   

  • GCC 11 Will Let You Use -std=c++23 But Without Turning On Any New Features - Phoronix

    A late change to GCC 11 is recognizing the -std=c++23 compiler option but without actually enabling any new features of this next major version of the C++ programming language. 

    It was just in September that the C++20 draft was approved as the latest major update to the C++ programming language. The GNU Compiler Collection has near complete coverage of C++20 with still lacking bits of the modules implementation. But while the next major iteration of C++ is still being figured out, GCC 11 will at least honor the compiler flag of "-std=c++23" or "-std=c++2b" but without actually enabling any new functionality over C++20. This is mainly for helping projects that will eventually default to using that flag but will still build cleanly with C++20 level functionality in the upcoming GCC 11 compiler release. 

  •                

  • Columnar layout with Awk

                     

                       

    Here’s a breakdown of a simple Awk script I wrote to format values into neatly aligned columns

                       

    I’m organising my GitHub repositories locally by creating a directory structure representing the different GitHub servers that I use and the orgs and users that I have access to, with symbolic links at the ends of these structures pointing to where I’ve cloned the actual repositories.

  • Dancer2 0.300005 Released

    Well, it’s been a hot minute since the last release, hasn’t it? Dancer2 0.300005 has landed on CPAN and features a number of bug fixes, enhancements, and doc patches...

  •      

  • New book: Get Started with MicroPython on Raspberry Pi Pico

             

  •   

  • Major (but not scary) python-slackclient update in f34+

    I’ve updated python-slackclient from 2.7.3 to 3.2.1. The module has changed from slack to slack_sdk. The new version is backwards compatible for now, and will just emit deprecation warnings. The full porting guide is at: https://slack.dev/python-slack-sdk/v3-migration/.

Videos/Audio: Rust, Screenlockers, and mintCast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Rust Programs Every Linux User Should Know About

    It seems like every new program is written in Rust these days. In fact, many older programs are being rewritten in Rust, including a lot of the standard shell utilities. Today, I wanted to briefly mention seven Rust programs that I have installed that I think you should know about.

  • Linux Lock Screens Are Fundamentally Flawed

    Screen locking is fundamentally an OS level problem however on Linux this is not how they are handled and this leads to some very simple exploits causing massive security holes on seemingly secure systems.

  • mintCast 353 – Brave New WWW

    First up, in our Wanderings, I have second thoughts about Kubuntu, Moss has a new toy, Joe has been playing with watches, Tony has been editing audio, Josh hasn’t broken Arch, Bo survived the pandemic!

    Then, our news we talk RPi Pico, Ubuntu’s Booting on an Apple M1, Flatpak is faster, Project Linux turns into Alma Linux, and more

    In security, the InterPlanetary File System

Lilbits: A new Linux-based tablet OS, and the latest Bond villain is… product placement?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A Chinese company has been teasing a new Linux-based operating system designed for tablets for the past few weeks, promising to release JingOS, “the world’s first iPadOS-style Linux distro” on January 31.

But it looks like the operating system may not only be for tablets – the company’s latest tease shows the operating system running on an 8 inch convertible mini-laptop that looks a lot like the Chuwi MiniBook.

Read more

Games: Unvanquished, Raft, Transport Fever 2, FreeSpace 2 and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Unvanquished Open-Source Game Still Pushing Slowly Ahead In 2021 - Phoronix

    Nearly a decade ago we were intrigued by Unvanquished as one of the most interesting open-source game/engine projects of the time. It was peculiar in going through dozens of alpha releases prior to drying up a few years ago. There hasn't been any major release yet past the prior alpha state but the project is in fact still moving along and issued their first new (point) release of the year as well as rolling out a new online updater.

  • How to play Raft on Linux

    Raft is a first-person survival video game developed by Redbeet Interactive and published by Axolot Games. The game was released in 2018 for Microsoft Windows. Raft does not have a native Linux version, and currently, there are no plans to release one. In this guide, we’ll show you how to set up Raft on Linux.

  • Google open sources VR painting app Tilt Brush | GamingOnLinux

    Tilt Brush, a popular VR app that lets users paint in a 3D space. Originally from Skillman & Hackett, it was later acquired by Google and now they've open sourced it.

    In an announcement post, Google mentioned it is no longer actively developed and so they are putting it out into the open fully into users hands and so it's now on GitHub under the Apache license. A few systems did get adjusted for the open source release due to licensing but nothing major.

  • Roboggled: A Puzzle Game Developed on Linux: Review

    Roboggled is a puzzle game, where you play as a robot that moves crates around. The game is presented in a 3D, top-down manner. The goal is to move the crate(s) in the level to an opening vault on the floor. Then, you’ll move on to the next level.

    Note: review copy sent to our curator. If you’re a game developer and want us to test your game, send it our way via Steam!

    Controls are very simple: just use the arrow keys on your keyboard or the analog stick/D-pad on your gamepad to move the robot around. If it’s pressing against a crate, simply moving in the direction of the crate will cause it to move. The robot will move one square at a time, but if it’s on ice, it won’t stop until it hits a wall or gets back on solid ground. So, at times, moving the crate towards its goal will require some strategy. If you made a mistake, you can go back one move by clicking the double-arrow icon on the top-right corner of the screen or pressing the left-shoulder button, or to restart entirely, click the single arrow at the top-left or press BACK on your controller.

    [...]

    I mentioned earlier the game is presented in top-down view. The background is this greenish color with white rectangles moving about. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but I think it would be pretty cool if there was an option to change the green color to something else.

    The soundtrack is hit or miss. While it has some good tunes, others are a little more…creepy, if you will. If there was an option or hotkey to change tracks, that would be great. Also, I think it would be of benefit of the music had a slider volume; right now there’s just an on and off toggle.

    The built-in level editor is pretty nice, but it’s a bit wonky. For instance, there are certain blocks on the grid that can’t have an item on it, particularly the blocks along the edge of the grid.

    For a price of $2, you really can’t go wrong here, though. Roboggled is a pretty decent puzzle game, and a plus is that there’s a Linux version and replayability value due to the in-game level editor.

  • How to Play Windows Games on Linux - LinuxLinks

    Windows is undoubtedly the most popular operating system for gaming. But it lacks various security measures. More and more people are switching to Linux because it has a very user-friendly interface and is more stable after updates than Windows. However, some are reluctant to try Linux out. It is namely because of a widespread notion that video games are unplayable on this operating system.

    Linux can run the same software like Windows, including web browsers, word processors, etc. There are far fewer games created exclusively for Linux. This operating system has witnessed major advances in recent years. Gaming enthusiasts can play the latest titles on their Linux OS with emulators and compatibility layers. So let’s explore this further and learn how you can play Windows games on Linux.

  • Dead Cells: Fatal Falls gives us more good excuses for another run

    Dead Cells: Fatal Falls is the latest DLC out now for the supremely stylish mix of action-platforming and metroidvania elements in Dead Cells. This new small expansion will enable the developer to continue expanding the game for everyone, with plenty of free updates like they have done in the past.

    Much like the previous DLC with The Bad Seed, it's not huge but it does nicely expand on what's already good with more excellent combat encounters. You can expect to find two extra mid-game biomes with new enemies, weapons, traps, lore rooms and a green-fingered boss!

  • How to play Monster Hunter: World on Linux

    Monster Hunter: World is an action RPG developed and published by Capcom. It is the fifth entry in the franchise. It was released in 2018 on PS4, Xbox One, and PC. However, there are currently no plans for an official Linux release.

  • Transport Fever 2 to release Vulkan API support on February 23

    More Vulkan API goodness is coming with Urban Games announcing that Transport Fever 2 will release the big Vulkan update on February 23 along with a macOS version.

    It's positively rated by users overall so they've done well with it and a major graphics API change is no small thing to do. Great to see though, especially as another developer opting for an open graphics API rather than a closed one like DirectX. Hopefully, this will lay out the foundation for continued support and give Urban Games more wiggle room to make it an ever bigger game, or perhaps work towards a third game in the series.

    Currently the Vulkan API support is available in a Beta (Steam only until release) and so you can join in, to ensure the Linux version is nicely polished up and let them know of any issues found. You can find more info on the dedicated Steam Group they setup especially to gather feedback on the testing.

  • FreeSpace 2 Source Code Project releases version 21.0.0

    FreeSpace and FreeSpace 2 are two of the absolute best space shooters around, and thankfully FreeSpace 2 continues living on very nicely with the FreeSpace 2 Source Code Project.

    A new release is up after another year of work with version 21.0.0 going up today, January 27 2021. There's some big stuff included in this release too!

KDE: Krita and Systemd Plasma Applet

Filed under
KDE

  • How to install Krita 4.4 on Linux Mint 20.1

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Krita 4.4 on Linux Mint 20.1. 

  •  

  • Short film made with Krita

    My name is Lucija Oroz and I am a professional animator from Croatia. In my spare time I love to read about the human mind and human behavior.

    The film 45” is my master’s degree project, the largest project I ever did. While working on it, I was so afraid that something would go wrong that I was unable to finish it, so I decided to something to cheer myself up. I got the chance to experience a tandem parachute jump. I was so impressed: it was both scary and beautiful.

    That was how the idea was born to combine my film with emotions that people usually experience during good or bad moments in their life.

  •  

  • Systemd Plasma Applet

    Just a short announcement that I pushed some commits to github https://github.com/jansenm/systemd-plasmoid and tagged a release 2.0.1. The first ever with a tag. Unfortunately I am not that sure I did that right so in case someone out there packages this and needs more just complain.

Graphics: NVIDIA, AMD and Intel's Latest

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

  • NVIDIA release the 460.39 Linux driver update, improved support for kernel 5.10+

    Ready for a new stable NVIDIA driver for Linux? There's a new one out now with added GPU support and some tidying up work done with bug fixes too.

  • AMD RDNA2 "Duty Cycle Scaling" Will Turn Off The GPU Under Heavy Load For Relief

    A new Radeon power management feature with RDNA2 graphics processors being exposed by the open-source Linux driver is Duty Cycle Scaling in the name of power/thermal management with a focus on low-power hardware.

    AMD graphics Duty Cycle Scaling is designed for "small power limit SKUs" and is designed to actually shut off the graphics core and power it back up based on current/power/temperature thresholds. Under heavy workloads, the AMD "DCS" functionality controlled by the graphics firmware will power down the GPU during heavy load scenarios for power/thermal relief before being powered back up to resume work.

  • Linux 5.12 Bringing VRR / Adaptive-Sync For Intel TIger Lake / Xe Graphics - Phoronix

    Finally with the upcoming Linux 5.12 cycle is support for Variable Rate Refresh (VRR) / Adaptive-Sync for Intel Tiger Lake "Gen12" Xe Graphics and newer. 

    The VRR/Adaptive-Sync support for the latest-generation Intel graphics with Tiger Lake and the likes of the forthcoming Rocket Lake, Alder Lake, and discrete DG1 graphics is now in order for the mainline kernel. The VRR enabling for Tiger Lake and newer was sent in this morning to DRM-Next ahead of the Linux 5.12 kernel. This effort has been going on for many months while now has reached the stage that it's ready for merging. 

  • Intel Iris Xe Discrete Card Will Only Work With Select CPUs and Motherboards

    These motherboards require a special BIOS that supports Intel Iris Xe, so the cards won’t be compatible with other systems.

Linux 5.10 LTS Status and More Stables Releases of Linux Announced Today

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.10 LTS Will Only Be Maintained Until EOY 2022 Unless More Companies Step Up

    Announced a few years ago was the notion of "extended" LTS kernel versions whereby the long term support cycle would span six years rather than the usual two years for LTS kernels in providing maintenance and bug/security fixes to the codebase. This means Linux 5.4 LTS is supported until the end of 2025, Linux 4.19 until the end of 2024, and even Linux 4.14 until the start of 2024. But with the recently minted Linux 5.10 LTS at least for now it's only being committed to maintenance until the end of next year.

    There's been differing remarks/indications for how long the Linux 5.10 long-term support cycle would last with many expecting six years given that's what has been happening on recent LTS kernels -- even the Linux 4.4 kernel is being planned for maintenance until February 2022 and Linux 4.9 until 2023. Linux stable maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman has now provided a more transparent answer on the Linux kernel mailing list stemming from the talk over how long Linux 5.10 will be maintained.

  • Three stable kernels

    Stable kernels 5.10.11, 5.4.93, and 4.19.171 have been released. They contain important fixes and users should upgrade.

  • 5.10.11
  • 5.4.93
  • 4.19.171

Security and FUD

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (sudo), CentOS (sudo), Debian (sudo), Fedora (kernel, php-pear, and sudo), Gentoo (cacti, mutt, and sudo), Mageia (sudo), openSUSE (sudo), Oracle (sudo), Red Hat (sudo), Scientific Linux (sudo), Slackware (sudo), SUSE (go1.14, go1.15, nodejs8, and sudo), and Ubuntu (libsndfile and sudo).

  • Mimecast admits certificate compromise tied to SolarWinds supply chain attack

    Email security firm Mimecast has admitted that the compromise of a certificate it had issued for some Microsoft services is connected to the SolarWinds supply chain incident.

  • SolarWinds Cyberattack: Layered OT Security Creates Best Defense

    The recent SolarWinds supply chain cyberattacks serve to underscore an age-old cybersecurity tenant, and the reason we need to continue beating the drum as cybersecurity professionals: Use a layered approach to OT security.

    This incident highlights a rare, specific use case of a nation state threat actor, an Advanced Persistent Threat (APT). In this particular case, layers provided somewhat limited value, but helped keep the less skilled attackers – about 99% of those on the playing field – at bay.

    Technology boundaries can be used to lessen the impact of (but unfortunately not prevent) nation state APTs. They not only offer additional protection, they may also help expose the presence of APTs in your network. Let’s examine how they would have helped in the case of APTs like the Sunburst malware that infected SolarWinds Orion software and was downloaded by 18,000 organizations.

  • Linux malware uses open-source tool to evade detection [Ed: How pro-Microsoft propaganda sites blame for a tool which comes from Microsoft (GitHub) "Open Source" and "Linux" (though it is the fault of neither). Alternative headline: Microsoft malware is being used to attack machines that run GNU/Linux]

    This tool is known as libprocesshider and is an open-source tool available on Github that can be used to hide any Linux process with the help of the ld preloader.

AMD Schedutil vs. Performance Governor Benchmarks On Linux 5.11 Shows More Upside Potential

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With a pending patch, the Linux 5.11 AMD Zen 2 / Zen 3 performance is looking very good as far as the out-of-the-box performance is concerned when using Schedutil as is becoming the increasingly default CPU frequency scaling governor on more distributions / default kernels. With the previously noted Linux 5.11 regression addressed from when the AMD CPU frequency invariance support was first introduced, the Schedutil performance from small Ryzen systems up through big EPYC hardware is looking quite good. But how much upside is left in relation to the optimal CPU frequency scaling performance with the "performance" governor? Here is a look at those benchmarks on Ryzen and EPYC for Schedutil vs. Performance on a patched Linux 5.11 kernel.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Visualizing system performance with RHEL 8 using Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) and Grafana (Part 2)

    In this post, I’d like to show you how to use Performance Co-Pilot (PCP) with Grafana and Redis to store and graph performance data for all the machines in your environment. We’ll do this in a simple two machine setup, but the concepts are the same as you add more machines.

  • Calibre 5.0 for Linux

    For those who like to read, Calibre is a wonderful program for managing e-books. Calibre will not only allowed to maintain and organize your library of e-books but also perform format conversions.

    Calibre can also let you read your e-books on your system without needing an e-reader. Of course, you can always read an e-book on a smartphone.

  • Firecracker: start a VM in less than a second

    Initially when I read about Firecracker being released, I thought it was just a tool for cloud providers to use – I knew that AWS Fargate and https://fly.io used it, but I didn’t think that it was something that I could directly use myself.

    But it turns out that Firecracker is relatively straightforward to use (or at least as straightforward as anything else that’s for running VMs), the documentation and examples are pretty clear, you definitely don’t need to be a cloud provider to use it, and as advertised, it starts VMs really fast!

    So I wanted to write about using Firecracker from a more DIY “I just want to run some VMs” perspective.

    I’ll start out by talking about what I’m using it for, and then I’ll explain a few things I learned about it along the way.

  • 3 email mistakes and how to avoid them

    In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 17 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021.

    OK, so we've talked about some things we should do with our email - Stop treating it as an instant messenger, Prioritize things, trying to reach Inbox Zero, and filtering it effectively. But what things SHOULDN'T we do?

  • 6 Steps to Teach Yourself System Administration

    Looking for ways to get started in system administration? In this Skills article, we’ll provide an overview of resources that will help you on your way. If you’re unfamiliar with the basics of what a system administrator does, we recommend starting with this introduction.

    There is no traditional path for acquiring the technical skills needed as a system administrator, according to Enable Sysadmin. “Some sysadmins have an associate or college degree, and some don’t. Depending on when a sysadmin began their career, he or she might have a variety of technical certificates ... or none at all.” Here, we provide an array of options with which to plot your own course of study.

  • How to install KaOS 2021.01
  • How to Install Krita 4.4.2 via Another PPA in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10

    For those prefer installing apps via apt method, the digital painting software Krita 4.4.2 now is available to install via another well trusted PPA for Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 20.10, Linux Mint 20.

    Krita 4.4.2 was released a week ago as the latest version of the free open-source painting software, with new features: SVG mesh Gradients, mesh transform, new gradient fill layer type, new brushes, and improved HiDPI support.

  • How to set up static IP address on Debian Linux 10/11 - nixCraft

    I have Debian 10 Linux cloud server, and it is configured to get IP addresses via DHCP. How do I convert DHCP address to static IP address settings?

  • How To Enable Hardware Accelerated Video Decode In Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi And Opera Browsers On Debian, Ubuntu Or Linux Mint

    Google Chrome 88 (and newer) has made hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux, but it's not enabled by default. Google Chrome is not the only Chromium-based web browser to support hardware acceleration on Linux though. This article explains how to enable hardware-accelerated video decoding in Google Chrome, Brave, Vivaldi and Opera web browsers running on Debian, Ubuntu, Pop!_OS or Linux Mint (Xorg only).

    Using hardware-accelerated video decode in your web browser should result in using less CPU usage (and thus, less battery draining) when playing online videos.

    It's worth noting that Chromium web browser had patches that allowed making hardware accelerated video decoding available on Linux for some time, and some Linux distributions packaged it using those patches. So Chromium users have had hardware acceleration on Linux for some time, depending on their Linux distribution or if they installed the patched Chromium in some other way. E.g. on Ubuntu / Linux Mint there's a PPA with VA-API patched Chromium builds. Thus, these instructions may also work for Chromium browser, depending on how it's built.

  • How to Manipulate Images in the Linux Terminal

    Ever tire of constantly opening up your favorite image editor for a simple crop, resize, or to change the file format? Maybe you have a need to easily perform these tasks in batch or within software?

    Here's how to use the Linux convert tool, which allows you to do all this with terminal via the command line, and much more.

10 Best Linux Distros for Developers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

While Linux might not be the favored operating system for casual users, it’s the go-to choice for most developers and programmers. Linux is a more practical OS that was explicitly designed with programming and developers in mind.

There are over 600 Linux distros to choose from, so even experienced users may seldom struggle to find their current project's ideal flavor. Linux distributions can vary hugely from one another, even though they are based on the same source. And if you’re looking to learn more about Linux distros, we’ve compiled a list of the 10 best Linux distros for developers.

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Puppy Linux Review and its Status Quo in the Linux Community

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If we had 30 seconds to describe Puppy Linux bluntly, we would classify it as an OS under the light-weight Linux distro family with a functional objective of creating a smooth and easy user experience while simultaneously minimizing the memory footprint usage as much as possible. In this context, the memory footprint refers to the RAM, or Main Memory is used while software like an Operating System is active or operational.

This 30-second assumptive description on Puppy Linux characterizes it as a Linux distro suitable for personal or home-user computers. If we are to assign it a birth year, then it would be 2003, and its creator being Barry Kauler.

Puppy Linux stands out in the Linux community despite its name not being hailed on regular occasions as other Linux distros like Ubuntu, Fedora, Centos, and Kali Linux. The respect it has in these user communities is due to its outstanding positive attributes on display.

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Tmux vs. Screen: Which Is the Best Terminal Multiplexer?

Filed under
Software

When you work with terminals in Linux often, you’re bound to run into some struggles when you want to multitask. Multiple windows or tabs are fine, but when you’re logged into a remote server or other system, you don’t always have access to tabs or multiple terminal windows. That’s where the stalwart members of the Linux system administration world tmux and screen come in. But, as with all things in the open source community, the choice here isn’t clear as to which one of these commands is better for your usage. Today, we walk you through tmux vs screen to decide which is the best terminal multiplexer.

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Best Linux distro - The last five years - 2016-2020

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Last year, for the first time in a decade, I did not write my end-of-year best distro reports. Because there wasn't anything majorly exciting to report about, and also because I found myself quite dejected and tired of testing systems for the sake of testing, going through the same old problems, bugs and regressions. Some of you even emailed me about this distinct absence of written judgment.

Then I thought, well, if 2020 wasn't fun Linux wise, perhaps we can have a longer view? How about the best distro released in the last five years? That sounds meaningful, and should also give us a good dose of reflection and nostalgia. Now, as always, this is subjective, so if you don't see your favorite distro on the list, it's because I'm writing from my perspective. Begin, shall we?

[...]

Here we are. Or rather, here I am. Will you send me an angel, I mean distro. So yes. The past five years, and the best distros spawned, hatched, released, and tested. Percentage wise, Xfce takes the lion's share of medals, but it's also the case of Xfce being "better" earlier, and Plasma later in this period. And even Fedora got onto my list, because a few years ago, it was quite nifty and fun. Then I got old and cynical. Or something.

The top entries for this list also feature distros that I use on my production systems. Combat-tested so to speak, with great delight and excellent results. My take on 2016-2020. And yes, you guessed right. We will have a sequel article, and it will cover the ENTIRE last decade. We'll examine 2011-2020, and vote on the bestest distro of them all. Take care.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Multi-OS PXE-booting from FreeBSD 12: Introduction (pt. 1)

    This is an introductory article; if you’re familiar with PXE you will want to skip the excursion but may be interested in the “Why”. The article ends with the post-installation setup of my test machine, turning it into a simple router so that the next article can start with the actual PXE-related setup.

  • Annotate your PDF files on OpenBSD

    On my journey to leave macOS, I regularly look to mimic some of the features I use. Namely, annotating (or signing) PDF files is a really simple task using Preview. I couldn’t do it on OpenBSD using Zathura, Xpdf etc. But there is a software in the ports that can achieve this: Xournal.

    Xournal is “an application for notetaking, sketching, keeping a journal using a stylus“. And now that my touchscreen is calibrated, highlighting can even be done with the fingers Smile

  • 30 Basic Linux Commands For Beginners [Linux 101]

    When I was introduced to Linux, I had a pretty hard time getting used to and learning Linux commands. There’s no secret to learning Linux in a day or two easily but to practice, fail, stand up and practice again, and learn from your mistakes. The easiest way to learn Linux is not to abandon it if you don’t understand how it works. In this article, let’s look at some of the basic Linux commands for beginners.

    This list of Linux terminal commands contains all the common commands. Think of it as a Linux command cheat sheet as it contains almost all the basic ones to get you started.

  • How to Verify SHA256 Checksum of File in Linux

    Internet security is one of the most important aspects when it comes to the world wide web. There has been constant research and development to improve the security of applications and files on the Internet and thus to prevent malicious use.

    Downloadable files over the Internet are often the target of attacks on the Internet. As thousands and thousands of people download these files regularly, it becomes especially important to protect such files.

    In this article, we will learn about checksums and how they can be used to authenticate a downloaded file from the Internet.

  • How to Check Linux Commands History by Dates

    The history command in Linux is used to view previously executed commands from the terminal. It will show a list of commands, with an ‘id’ next to each command.

  • How to restore Ubuntu’s EFI partition in Ubuntu 20.04

    I recently got a new pre-loved laptop and as always I nuked Windows but in the process of booting up, I noticed that my BIOS was a bit out of date. Like a whole year out of date.

  • How to Install and Use Docker Compose on Ubuntu 20.04 | 18.04

    Docker Compose is a command-line tool for defining and running multi-container applications. With Docker compose, you can run multiple containers as a single service. The containers are still isolated, but they can interact with each other. With Docker compose, you get the benefits of single-host deployment, great security, ease of setup and configuration which leads to really high productivity and efficiency.

    For example, if you have an application that requires an Apache web server and MariaDB database, you can create a docker-compose.yaml file that can run both the containers as a service without the need to start each one separately.

  • How to capture terminal sessions and output with the Linux script command | Enable Sysadmin

    The Linux script command creates a typescript file from your terminal session. This means that if you invoke the script command, you are dropped to a "watched and recorded" terminal session subshell that's saved to an ASCII text file. When created with a timing file, you can replay the session, including output. The purpose of script is that you can easily grab sample output from any command through an interactive session exactly as it's displayed in your terminal. You can use backspace, edit files, create files, and run simple or complex commands.

  • How to replay terminal sessions recorded with the Linux script command | Enable Sysadmin

    In my previous article, How to capture terminal sessions and output with the Linux script command, covering the script command and some common options, you learned how to record your interactive terminal sessions. This follow-up article demonstrates how to replay those recorded terminal sessions.

  • Critical bug in sudo puts Linux and Unix systems at risk

    Any logged-in unprivileged user can abuse an old bug in sudo to gain root privileges. It was rated as an important security issue for Linux and Unix-like operating systems. The Qualys research team has discovered the heap overflow vulnerability in sudo itself has been hiding in plain sight for nearly 10 years. The bug allows any local users to gain root access without authentication (no user's password needed). We need to apply patches to our operating systems as soon as possible.The post Critical bug in sudo puts Linux and Unix systems at risk appeared first on nixCraft.

  • How to Install JDownloader on Debian

    JDownloader is a great tool that can be used to download files from multiple servers simultaniously. It is open source and is supported on all major platforms, the tool is written in Java. It comes in handy when you have to download multiple files at once located at different file hosting services. This tool provides you with the control to pause, stop or start the downloads. It allows you to set bandwidth limitations and it saves a lot of time by changing the way you download files from the internet.

    In this article, we will explain how to install JDownloader on a Debian OS. We have used Debian 10 for running the commands and procedure described in this article.

  • How To Set Or Change Hostname On Linux - OSTechNix

    We already discussed how to view or find a Linux system's hostname. In this brief guide, we will see how to set or change hostname in Linux, either temporarily or permanently.

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More in Tux Machines

Cluster Server R2 2U rack cluster server ships with up to 72 Rockchip RK3399/RK3328 SoMs

Rockchip RK3399 and RK3328 are typically used in Chromebooks, single board computers, TV boxes, and all sort of AIoT devices, but if you ever wanted to create a cluster based on those processor, Firefly Cluster Server R2 leverages the company’s RK3399, RK3328, or even RK1808 NPU SoM to bring 72 modules to a 2U rack cluster server enclosure, for a total of up to 432 Arm Cortex-A72/A53 cores, 288 GB RAM, and 18 3.5-inch hard drives. Firefly says the cluster can run Android, Ubuntu, or some other Linux distributions. Typical use cases include “cloud phone”, virtual desktop, edge computing, cloud gaming, cloud storage, blockchain, multi-channel video decoding, app cloning, etc. When fitted with the AI accelerators, it looks similar to Solidrun Janux GS31 Edge AI server designed for real-time inference on multiple video streams for the monitoring of smart cities & infrastructure, intelligent enterprise/industrial video surveillance, object detection, recognition & classification, smart visual analysis, and more. There’s no Wiki for Cluster Server R2 just yet, but you may find some relevant information on the Wiki for an earlier generation of the cluster server. Read more

How to Get Install Docker On Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Docker is an Open source technology that allows you to install an run application on several containers (machine) without Interfering with the host or other containers technology is similar to Virtualization, but it is more portable and easy to use. What is the type of Docker are available? There is two types of Docker are available Docker CE (Community Edition) and Docker EE (Enterprise Edition). Read more

today's howtos

  • Simple router setup with nftables

    Router setup in linux is fun and important for situations when you have only server, computer. Forwarding, firewall rules and at least 2 network interface cards is the minimal requiremnt for setting up router. Our router setup will be on Rhel 8. The installation and configuration steps are: [...]

  • find mostly doesn't need xargs today on modern Unixes

    For usage with find, all of this is unnecessary on a modern Unix and has been for some time, because find folded this into itself. Modern versions of find don't have just the traditional '-exec', which runs one command per file, but also an augmented version of it which aggregates the arguments together like xargs does. This augmented version is used by ending the '-exec' with '+' instead of ';', like so: [...]

  • Linux fmt Command – Formatting Text on the Command Line

    The fmt command is a text utility included in the GNU Core Utilities. It was originally created to format email messages at the command line. However, it can be very useful for reading any text files in the terminal. Sure, modern terminals will wrap text to fit in the window. But they don’t wrap at a word, it could split a word right down the middle. This makes it hard to read and even harder to keep your place.

  • How To Install Observium on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Observium on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Observium is a Network Management and Monitoring System that collects data from multiple devices using SNMP and allows you to monitor all of the network’s devices via an easy-to-use interface. It is PHP-based and uses a MySQL database to store data. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Observium on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Exclude Specific File Extension While Copying Files Recursively

    As you might already know, ‘cp’ is the command line program in Linux to copy files and directories.

Contributing to KDE is easier than you think – Bug triaging

Today, 2021-01-28, is the Plasma Beta Review Day for Plasma 5.21, that is to say, Plasma 5.20.90. Right now it’s a bit after 2 a.m., so after this I’m going to bed so I can be present later. This month I’ve mostly been enjoying my post-job vacation as last year I was bordering burnout. As such I didn’t help much. Before bed I’ll be providing a few things I’ve learned about triaging, though. While this blog post isn’t specifically about the Beta Review Day, this should make the general bug triaging process clearer for you, making it quite timely. Read more